If it looks like the delay is going to cost you more than the airline is offering -- like if you had a non-refundable hotel reservation, or miss a private helicopter ride (look at you!) -- you’ve got 30 days to try and get as much money out of them as you can. But once you put a check into your bank account, you’ve essentially agreed to accept whatever you were offered.
Is there any website where you can meet up travelers and make plans. I don’t know if that’s a bad idea lol but I have a friend I travel with but he can’t make it all the time and even thought I have travel alone, i do prefer traveling with someone else for help with picture, life talk, and just being a little safer tbh even though I do agree with you that most places are safer than media makes them up to be. Any suggestions?
Hits the nail on the head on so many points. This brings back many memories of our travels, like when we packed too much and wanted to kill each other since we were both so miserable with our heavy bags. And the time we had to give up on the hostel in Morocco and paid for a pool day pass at the Sofitel. We felt like we were cheating, but in the end, we needed the rejuvenation. Always love your posts, thanks for the inspiration and congrats on all the years of traveling together!
Thank you for this! My husband and I will be travelling with our 16 month old daughter from the Philippines to Singapore. Though it’s relatively a short trip (both the flight duration and the stay in the country), I looked up tips and tricks for travelling with an infant because…well…I’m a dooms day prepper haha. Love your photos, your darling daughter and love that you’re about breastfeeding and natural stuff but are practical and no nonsense. I pray many more safe and wonderful travels for you and your family!
Before booking a flight, consider if the rate is cheaper if paid in another currency. Often budget airlines will make you pay in the currency of the country you’re departing from, but this isn’t always the case. An important note when doing this: make sure you’re using a credit card that is free of foreign-transaction fees, otherwise your attempts to save money doing this will be lost! Our article on money matters for world travellers can help steer you in the right direction for the best credit cards for travel.
13 There are a number of instances where you might need to carry extra documentation when travelling with children. If you have an adopted child, you must take their adoption papers; and if you're the only parent travelling - regardless of your marital status - you might be asked for proof of consent from the other parent for your child to travel. This is more likely in countries where overseas adoption and/or child trafficking is common. If the name on your child's passport is not the same as yours, or if your child bears little resemblance to you, the chances of this being an issue increase.
46 If you plan on walking or cycling, remember that young children won't want to focus on getting from A to B, but on following their interests, so allow time for exploring. Plan your route around the capacity of your youngest child and your ability to carry them. Try to choose a route where the scenery will change frequently. Good choices for walks or rides include following a river or canal towpath; there are no hills to negotiate, and there's the possible bonus of water to play in and birds to feed. It's also a good idea to combine walks or rides with an activity such as swimming or taking a short train ride.
Usually you will need to take your baby out of the sling or stroller to walk through the metal detector, and usually they will want you to collapse the stroller and put it on the belt. If you’re flying alone, I recommend getting everything out you need to get out *before* you get in the security line. Stash your laptop under the stroller, liquids in a ziplock, and that way you can just throw it in the tray and not be struggling to get it out while wrangling a baby *and* folding a stroller if you have one. See below for my easy-one-hand-collapse stroller recommendation. In other situations they want someone to walk through with the baby, hand the baby off, and then walk back through alone. It helps to have a partner for this otherwise a security officer can hold the baby.
If you have status with an airline -- or even if you don’t -- ask for exit-row seats when you arrive at the gate.  Those seats cost extra, and are most frequently the only ones left empty, even on so-called “extremely full” flights; they’re often filled by traveling flight attendants and pilots (known as Dead Heads or Non-Revs) assigned available seats at the last minute. If you ask nicely and are super polite (which, frequent flyers will tell you, is a big factor in getting free stuff) the gate agent has the power to give them to you.
4. No temper tantrums. There's that passenger who's upset anytime their flight doesn't go perfectly. They didn't get an upgrade, their special meal didn't show up or their flight was delayed or canceled. So they decide to release their wrath on gate agents, flight attendants or whoever else they feel wronged them. Calm down and realize that things don't always go your way during travel (or in life).
Is it your first time flying? If you're a plane virgin looking ahead to your maiden flight, you're sure to have a few questions, some of which you may be too embarrassed to ask your jet-setter friends. If your first flight is long-haul, you'll want to read our tips for long haul flights and advice for sleeping on a plane. Read on for our tips for first time flyers, which we hope will help you to breeze through your first flight with confidence and excitement.
If you don’t like a country’s customs, remain open minded, rather than immediately jumping to conclusions that you’re right and it’s wrong. Ask questions, research more, and listen to other peoples’ point of view. And don’t let your bad experiences taint an entire country — if you had a crap time somewhere, it doesn’t mean that the country sucks or it’s not safe. Maybe it was just bad luck.

Great suggestions! We traveled with our daughters (who are now grown and living in another state) all the time and I think they developed a worldly sensibility because of it. When I would drive carpool, some recollection of or connection to one of our trips always seemed to come up in conversations with their friends. I realized that the traveling we did had a profound impact on who they are, what they value, and the openness with which they regard choices, solutions, and ideas. They don’t get so ruffled by set-backs and obstacles because they remember confronting obstacles all over the world. They know that there are beautiful people and places all over the world, so they care about the needs of others in faraway places. Traveling also helped them to define who they are as women, Americans, and Los Angelenos. We traveled to lots of other states (camping and hoteling) as well as other countries, as I believed it was important (and fun!) for them to gain a wider appreciation for the people and places in their own country, as well as abroad.
One of the first lessons I learned on the road was that your plans will nearly always change. You’ll arrive in a place and hate it and want to leave immediately, or you’ll fall in love with a destination and want to spend longer there. You’ll make friends with a group of awesome people and want to change your plans so you can travel with them for longer, or you’ll find out about an amazing town that’s nearby and want to head there instead.

BabyZen YoYo 0+ Stroller – This is my absolute favorite stroller for travel. It folds up compact enough to fit in an overhead bin (though you can gate check it if you like), has a sizeable undercarriage, and is so easy to fold up and pop out (for a stroller anyway). Can’t recommend highly enough. You can use it from infancy with the bassinet attachment and switch to the seat once they’re big enough). It also can adapt to many carseats, and has wonderful accessories for different weather conditions like rain, cold, and sun. You may notice she’s in a Stokke Xplory in the photos, and that’s because we use it around town sometimes. But the BabyZen YoYo is it for travel.


Do you usually toss your boarding pass as soon as you step off the plane? You might want to reconsider. Your boarding pass can serve as proof of travel if your airline fails to give you the proper credit for frequent flier miles; this type of problem is particularly common if you’re flying on a codeshare partner of the airline in question. Your boarding pass can also be useful as a receipt for tax purposes, particularly if you’re self-employed.
Flying Appreciate your advice I will be travelling with my 4yr old hyper active son & 10mth old daughter in June15. I know my main challenge will be to keep my son entertained. Last time I travelled with him he was 18mths & was a nightmare as we took 2 7hr flights travelling nearly 24hrs, other passengers were not impressed with is screaming. I did find it difficult to deal with the stares & comments under their breath when I was trying my hardest to sooth him. I myself could not act in the manor these passengers did, no compassion, I myself would've offered to help. My daughter is a lot younger & the flight is not as long, I intend to keep her carm & hold off her nap How can I stop my children being inquisitive. I have started the in flight game with my son which involves him taking care of his sister, using the fact I limit his help at home. I know he will love the present game, his rewards at home are harder to achieve. I am so excited for this holiday & more relaxed reading your tips.Thanks Reply
I would definetely prefer an aisle seat on International flights, I frequently use the bathroom and it could be a little bit uncomfortable to bother other people while I´m on the window seat, plus on long flights I go to my hand luggage very frequently, to take out a book, to put it back, to take some slippers, to take them out, etc… I´m such a mess hehe…
"My shoes come off once I'm settled into my seat, so I always pack wooly or thick socks and wear easy-to-slip-on shoes or boots for the flight," says Arn. Another item to consider are compression socks, which not only keep toes warm but can help feet and legs from swelling on long flights, and can also help thwart deep-vein thrombosis (blood clots). Dial shares a tip for diminutive passengers such as herself: She travels with a lightweight, collapsible footstool that she can put under the seat in front of her that lets her stretch out and elevate her legs.
You’re not crazy for thinking that a flight price has changed after searching it a few times in your web browser. Based on the cookies in your browser, flight prices do increase when a particular route is repeatedly searched, as the site wants to scare you into booking the flight quickly before prices get even higher. Always search for flights in incognito or private browsing mode to see the lowest prices.
Such an interesting post. I haven’t traveled much since having kids. (Not for lack of wanting to, more for financial reasons. I would love to show my kids the world.) I would love to hear more about how you handle traveling in countries without easy access to potable water and with safety standards that are more lax. Did you worry about her drinking the bath water, did you take her in tuk-tuks or rickety public buses, that sort of thing? I lived breifly in India and dream about taking my kids there someday but it also seems like such a potential minefield.
You might want to mention that many (most?) banks with online services allow you to instantly set daily & weekly limits on your ATM and credit card purchases, and many of them let you adjust those limits for a particular period of time, such as when you are traveling. I always set lower limits on my cards when I am traveling, just a bit of insurance. 

I book all of my flights through Skyscanner, because it consistently finds cheapest deals. The key here is to keep things flexible: I look at flights to an entire country (or search for “everywhere” if I’m not sure where to head next) and look at prices over a whole month. I don’t collect points and miles, but I still rarely spend more than $500 on a long-haul flight.

Seriously. If you do only one thing before you leave, make it getting travel insurance. I’ve heard far too many horror stories of travellers injuring themselves in remote places and ending up in hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of debt. Don’t think that it won’t happen to you, because you know those travellers they thought that, too. I use World Nomads for my travel insurance provider and I’ve been really happy with them.


Different airlines have different policies. Some require an infant to be at least two days old, others at least 2 weeks old. Doctors recommend you wait until your baby’s immune system is more developed before flying, usually at least one month, though most recommend anywhere between 3-6 months. We didn’t fly with Eula until she was 4 months old, but we took car trips with her down to Atlanta (a 2 hour drive) to visit Matt’s parents before that. It was nice cutting our teeth on those few road trips before flying. Our first flight was domestic, and we took her up to NYC over the holidays. And it was great! By 5 months old she went on her first international flight, Atlanta to London, and by 7 months old she made the 14  hour flight from Atlanta to Tokyo.
You’ll learn a lot about yourself and how to become independent. It’s a cliché, but it’s true. Traveling solo taught me how to fend for myself, talk to people, and handle unfamiliar situations with ease. It’s made me comfortable with myself, helped me learn about what I’m capable of, and allowed me to be super selfish and do whatever I want! It can take some getting used to if you’ve never done it before but do it at least once. Make yourself uncomfortable and surprise yourself. You’ll learn valuable life skills when you push yourself!
Select your seats ASAP. “If you have a disability and need a premium seat in the bulkhead, tell the agent when you make your reservation rather than at the airport,” says David Martin, a Delta passenger-service specialist who creates the airline’s policies for customers with disabilities. Other passengers might be able to nab those seats 24 hours before the flight, when they’re made available to everyone through the airline’s website.

Find an Independent Lounge: Airspace has a small network of lounges in domestic airports, which American Express Platinum card members can access for free. In Asia and Canada, look for spaces from Plaza Premium ($49 per visit); No. 1 Traveller ($45 per visit) and Servisair ($28 per visit) have lounges throughout the U.K. Services such as Lounge Pass (from $35 per visit) and Priority Pass ($27 per visit, plus $99 annually) partner with airlines and independent companies to offer access to locations worldwide.
19 Child monitors can be a real help to keep an eye on young children in crowded places such as airports and shopping malls. The parent carries a tracking device - about the size of a TV remote control - while the child wears a watch-like contraption. Should the distance between the child and the tracker exceed the user-defined range, or if the bracelet is removed, an alarm sounds. Furthermore, once the tracker sounds the alarm, you can push a button to set off a bleeper on your child's bracelet to help you track them down.
Disasters happen. It’s always good to have a backup in case you get robbed or lose a card. You don’t want to be stuck somewhere new without access to your funds. I once had a card duplicated and a freeze put on it. I couldn’t use it for the rest of my trip. I was very happy I had an extra and not like my friend, who didn’t and was forced to borrow money from me all the time!
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