Some trains have seats in open-plan saloons, indeed most modern trains have this sort of seating.  Some trains, often older ones and often in eastern Europe, have seats in traditional 6-seater compartments with a side corridor running the length of the car.  There are sliding (but non-lockable) doors to each compartment.  Very occasionally you'll find both sorts of seating on one train, and some booking systems (such as the German Railways site bahn.de or Austrian site oebb.at) will ask you which you prefer.  Unless you're in a group of 5 or 6 people, most travellers prefer open-plan saloon seating, which also gives you a better view out as you can view diagonally forwards and backwards through all the coach windows, not just directly sideways through your own window.
If you want to get on the flight, and sleep with as little disturbance as possible, then a window seat may be the best option – you also get the outer cabin wall to lean against, rather than falling asleep on your fellow travellers. Remember however that the cabin walls on some aircraft have more curvature than others, and the window seat can feel as if it has less shoulder-room that ordinary seats.
On many long haul aircraft, some passengers will find that their footspace (ie the area under the seat in front) is impacted by the location of the control box for the IFE (inflight entertainment). This is something that is gradually being changed and improved by seat suppliers, but don’t expect quick results. Across many airlines, this IFE control box might be located in the aisle seat footwell area, although for some it is the window or middle seat that suffers – so, no hard and fast rules here.
✅ Trip Verified | We travelled Air Canada from Montreal to LAX yesterday in Business Class. The plane is a new Boeing 737. It seems like Air Canada is following the Rouge tradition by having the most uncomfortable seats imaginable even on a brand new plane. The thickness of the back cushion is very thin and there is a horizontal rod that is placed it seems to cause maximum discomfort. This flight is 6 hours! The foot rests are also extraordinarily cheap and won’t go down unless you get on your knees and manipulate it manually. Also, just like horrible Rouge, the seat posts are positioned so that you cannot store any hand luggage in front of your seat . The middle section has to be shared by seat neighbors. Air Canada used to be our favorite airline and now we have advised our travel agent to research any alternative to Air Canada and Rouge. 

We use cookies and similar technologies on our website to improve the content and functioning of our website and to show you relevant advertising. Our website might also contain third party cookies from our partners. You can learn more about how we use these technologies in our Cookies Policy and Privacy Policy. We want our website to be informative, personal, and as user friendly as possible and cookies and similar technologies help us achieve that goal.
MLB All-Star Game MLB Opening Day MLB Playoffs World Series Arizona Diamondbacks Atlanta Braves Baltimore Orioles Boston Red Sox Chicago Cubs Chicago White Sox Cincinnati Reds Cleveland Indians Colorado Rockies Detroit Tigers Houston Astros Kansas City Royals Los Angeles Angels Los Angeles Dodgers Miami Marlins Milwaukee Brewers Minnesota Twins New York Mets New York Yankees Oakland Athletics Philadelphia Phillies Pittsburgh Pirates San Diego Padres San Francisco Giants Seattle Mariners St. Louis Cardinals Tampa Bay Rays Texas Rangers Toronto Blue Jays Washington Nationals
new business class seats are extremely uncomfortable if you are more than 6' tall -head rest provides no support unless you slouch down and then the lumbar support doesn't provide any benefit - leg room is inadequate and movement severely restricted - leg rest extension doesn't provide adequate support below the knee - overhead lighting poorly positioned - fully flat position has no room to move and feet are jammed into the foot well - difficult to get in and out of as entrance is small and restricted overall - the old pods were superior - this is the worst business class seat I have ever had - impossible to get comfortable

In addition, due to cramming so many seats into the Econ, there's less lavatories (long line-ups), no duty free onboard (no room), not enough room for carryon, and very poor service with long waits for food. Carryon bins were full half way through the boarding and it was chaos trying to fit your stuff. Forget about bringing 2 bags or jacket with you expecting it to fit overhead, meaning you need to keep those in your tiny seat further making it less comfortable.


This is a matter of personal choice, but on widebody aircraft you will generally find that the front of the Economy cabin is the quietest, normally just in front of the aircraft engines. The rear of the cabin tends to be noisiest from an engine noise perspective, and this also tends to bump around more during turbulence – of course, on less than full flights, you normally find that there are more empty seats at the back of the plane where you can spread out. For the meal services, it is difficult to suggest where you are more likely to be offered the full choice of meals before they run out! Some airlines start meal services from the front of the cabin, some the middle, and a few from the back of the cabin!
This was supposed to be an A330-300, however, the configuration was different than the seat choice map. This seems to be pretty common for Air Canada. The last time I flew this route it was in premium economy, however the premium economy had 4 seats in the middle and the "extra" legroom was not any better or worth the money over regular coach, so thought I would try bulkhead, row 18. I am not sure it was worth the seat cost. The person next to me asked to be moved even though he paid extra for the seat because he had a broken foot and it was more uncomfortable than regular economy where you can put your feet under the seat in front of you. This row perhaps had a bit more space from the back of the seat to the bulkhead, however the extra space for knees does not help your feet, and all bags need to go overhead. Having the seat next to me empty meant I could fold my legs over the tray table armrest that was not movable and stretch out a bit to sleep.
Advertiser Disclosure: Some links to credit cards and other products on this website will earn an affiliate commission. Outside of banner ads published through the Boarding Area network, this compensation does not impact how and where products appear on this site. While we do try to list all the best miles and points deals, the site does not include all card companies or credit card offers available in the marketplace. Please view our advertising policy page for additional details about our partners.
I am Elite Air Canada member for over 10 years but flying economy in this plane makes me say NEVER again. I strongly advise against anyone choosing this airplane. The new 3-4-4 crammed configuration is horrendous. Too tight. But AC flights are still full.... that's why they cram in so many seats. Disgusted with the configuration. Food - AWFUL. Had a small meal right after take off in FRA and nothing again until 1h from YYZ - and it was a tiny little horrible pie inside a cardboard box. That's it!! Attendants were not exactly friendly. Avoid at all costs!!!

Seating plans have a wide range of purposes. At formal dinners, they are usually used to avoid chaos and confusion upon entrance and to follow the etiquette. In this case, it is customary to arrange the host and hostess at the opposite sides of the table, and alternate male and female guests throughout.[1] Place cards can be used to direct guests. State dinners have their own protocol and arrangements are made so that the most distinguished guests can have the possibility to engage in conversation. Plans are also made for airplanes, where the objective is to differentiate passengers between the various travel classes and ensure everybody has a place. Similarly, theatres or cinemas may allow spectators to choose their seats beforehand. A seating plan is of crucial importance for musical ensembles or orchestras, where every type of instrument is allocated a specific section.[2]
Airline seat pitch guides give you an indication of how much legroom you can expect. Economy class cabins on long haul flights generally offer 31 to 32 inches seat pitch (the industry standard), with a smaller number of airlines providing 33 to 35 inches of seat pitch. The higher the seat pitch, the fewer the number of seats an airline can fit into the cabin, so in present economic times do not expect to see airlines increasing seat pitch standards! It is important to remember that newer “slimline” seats do mean that a 32 inch seat pitch can offer as much personal legroom space as an older type of seat in a 34 inch seat pitch.
As for Vij’s comparison to WestJet: their Plus seating is more pitch, a blocked middle seat with a free sandwich and snack (and unlimited complimentary booze). AC’s long haul J service includes 4 hot meal choices in china dishes, and two premium red, 2 premium whites as well as expanded beverages (Cranberry juice and Perrier). WestJet continues to charge for meals in Y on their overseas flights, AC still provides complimentary hot meals with choice of entrée and free booze in Y on Asia and Europe flights (not US, Mexico or Caribbean).
Some trains have seats in open-plan saloons, indeed most modern trains have this sort of seating.  Some trains, often older ones and often in eastern Europe, have seats in traditional 6-seater compartments with a side corridor running the length of the car.  There are sliding (but non-lockable) doors to each compartment.  Very occasionally you'll find both sorts of seating on one train, and some booking systems (such as the German Railways site bahn.de or Austrian site oebb.at) will ask you which you prefer.  Unless you're in a group of 5 or 6 people, most travellers prefer open-plan saloon seating, which also gives you a better view out as you can view diagonally forwards and backwards through all the coach windows, not just directly sideways through your own window.
We spend a lot of time getting our seating charts/seat maps right because we know how important they are when deciding which event to attend. When possible, we’ll provide you with photos of actual seat views from different locations in a venue. You can go to our Air Canada Centre seat views page to see them. Air Canada Centre can hold up to 19,800 people but that's a lot of seats and therefore a lot of potential seat views. We wish we had all 19,800 individual seat views for Air Canada Centre but we don't, therefore the seat views we show are usually a sample from different sections in a venue.
Also, the exit row seats will not have a PTV entertainment screen on the back of the seat in front (as most seats), but will have the video screen stored in the armrest – similar for the meal tray table which will be stored in your armrest. Because of this design layout, you might find that the actual seat width is less than ordinary seats, and it can be quite cumbersome using the PTV and tray tables – guess it is a case of measuring that against the benefit of extended leg space you will get.
×