Seats are a personal choice. Over the wing you will see less. Behind the wing you will have more noise from the engines. Towards the end you will have less fresh air. Close to the lavatories and galleys you will have more people and noise. At the window you are locked in. At the aile you get more disturbed. At the bulkhead you have more babies. They may run out of food options towards the end of the cabin and so on. The perfect seat for one person is a bad seat for another person. Have a look here and decide for yourself: seatguru.com/airlines/Air_Canada/Air_Canada_…
Expert Flyer offers free and pro subscriptions. Under free, travelers can use the website to find a better seat by entering their flight information and creating an alert when a more desirable seat becomes available. Under pro, there are basic and premium levels that offer services that include data for more than 400 airlines, detailed seat maps, and the ability to search for awards and upgrades. Users can also download free iOS and Android apps that offer the same service.
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Expert Flyer offers free and pro subscriptions. Under free, travelers can use the website to find a better seat by entering their flight information and creating an alert when a more desirable seat becomes available. Under pro, there are basic and premium levels that offer services that include data for more than 400 airlines, detailed seat maps, and the ability to search for awards and upgrades. Users can also download free iOS and Android apps that offer the same service.
✅ Trip Verified | Boeing 787 seats are extremely uncomfortable. Seat padding is thin and you can feel it on your back. On the other hand seat pitch and width is too tight. Basically this aircraft was designed for 8 abreast but airlines have squeezed 3x3x3 adding an extra seat. Aisles are so narrow that you continuously get bumbled by trolleys/passengers. Avoid this aircraft and try to use Airbus 330/350 if possible, because fuselage is about a foot wider with same number of seats

We spend a lot of time getting our seating charts/seat maps right because we know how important they are when deciding which event to attend. When possible, we’ll provide you with photos of actual seat views from different locations in a venue. You can go to our Air Canada Centre seat views page to see them. Air Canada Centre can hold up to 19,800 people but that's a lot of seats and therefore a lot of potential seat views. We wish we had all 19,800 individual seat views for Air Canada Centre but we don't, therefore the seat views we show are usually a sample from different sections in a venue.
Air Canada have revamped their pods in business class and the result is not good. They are narrower than before and taper very abruptly at the end, which means your feet are crammed together uncomfortably. I got very little sleep and had little luck distracting myself with the inflight entertainment,which now appears to be little more than an afterthought. The music choices were miserably poor: just four or five pieces in each category. On the plus side, the food was much better than a year ago.
It's a very small and cramped little nook on the air plane. I spent the extra $ to book a emergency exit row, and this time I regretted. There's no windows but tons of leg room. Also, there's absolutely no space to stow away your personal item bag. I was also on the plane with another man who was tall and large build which also made it uncomfortable for both of us. There are tons of people constantly coming in and out and wiating in front of you to use the washroom, so it also disruptive. Wouldn't recommend this seat if you are trying to catch some sleep.

While not surprising, Air Canada will sell the forward cabin of these transatlantic flights as business class, even though the seat isn’t really competitive internationally. Pricing seems to be comparable to what you’d pay for a flat bed on a 777 or 787. For example, a roundtrip ticket between Toronto and Shannon will run you ~$2,900. Logically it seems like they should market it as premium economy in terms of the product offering, but I guess they do this because they can get away with it.


Airline seat pitch guides give you an indication of how much legroom you can expect. Economy class cabins on long haul flights generally offer 31 to 32 inches seat pitch (the industry standard), with a smaller number of airlines providing 33 to 35 inches of seat pitch. The higher the seat pitch, the fewer the number of seats an airline can fit into the cabin, so in present economic times do not expect to see airlines increasing seat pitch standards! It is important to remember that newer “slimline” seats do mean that a 32 inch seat pitch can offer as much personal legroom space as an older type of seat in a 34 inch seat pitch.
Our team were unanimous in selecting seats A or C, H or K in Rows 31-34 on this aircraft. On the plus side, you are at the quietest end of the cabin, will be amongst the first to deplane at destination, and stand a good choice of getting the full choice of meals on offer. Toilets are all to the rear, so no odours or queuing passengers nearby. On the downside, if the bassinet seats in Row 29/30 are full occupied by families with babies, there is a chance of occasional crying etc – so a good noise-cancelling headset would be a must.
Expert Flyer offers free and pro subscriptions. Under free, travelers can use the website to find a better seat by entering their flight information and creating an alert when a more desirable seat becomes available. Under pro, there are basic and premium levels that offer services that include data for more than 400 airlines, detailed seat maps, and the ability to search for awards and upgrades. Users can also download free iOS and Android apps that offer the same service.
We spend a lot of time getting our seating charts/seat maps right because we know how important they are when deciding which event to attend. When possible, we’ll provide you with photos of actual seat views from different locations in a venue. You can go to our Air Canada Centre seat views page to see them. Air Canada Centre can hold up to 19,800 people but that's a lot of seats and therefore a lot of potential seat views. We wish we had all 19,800 individual seat views for Air Canada Centre but we don't, therefore the seat views we show are usually a sample from different sections in a venue.
These planes are configured in two classes of service, with very nice lie-flat sleeper suites in Executive First Class. Pioneered by Virgin Atlantic, the seats are arranged in a herringbone fashion, angled at about 45 degrees to the direction of flight, and might take a little getting used to. Due to the angle of the seats, those that want a view out the window will really have to turn their head. However, every seat is an aisle seat and there is no need to climb over your neighbor or wake them in the middle of the flight. 

For 77W ver 2, The side rows of Premium Economy (14A/C/H/K) are very poorly designed with recline severely limited by the wall behind. For the middle seats (14D/E/F/G), there is more recline space to the wall. When the seat in front reclines, it feels very claustrophobic and forget about trying to pick up anything below, since even untying your shoelace can be very difficult. On this plane, the first row of seats has more leg space than I've seen on other Premium Econ on AC. This is the first time I've noticed the recline in the last row so poor, and I've sat in 14K many times on other AC planes.
Being seated next to or opposite the Galley areas can also be a bad choice – you will find that the level of pedestrian traffic (cabin staff and passengers) is much higher, the curtains may not always be kept shut so you get light intrusion, and as hard as staff might try, the preparation and clearance of meals will result in the galleys being quite noisy for these periods of the flight.
The aisle seat gives you easy access to walk around, but worth remembering that you might be getting up and down for your fellow passenger seated next to you. The aisle seat positions can also be prone to knocks and bumps as passengers walk past or try to squeeze past service carts in the cabin – you often find out in an aisle seat how inconsiderate some fellow travellers can really be!
Most airlines now charge an additional fee to sit in the exit rows, others will allocate at check-in (remarkably some airlines still favour these seats for much taller passengers!). You do get a lot more legroom in an exit seat, but on the downside there are a few points to remember. You will not be allowed to keep any items of hand-luggage (even books etc sometimes) by your seat/footwell area during landing and take-off periods, and as the bins above your seat may be full by the time you realise, you will have to hope for a cooperative cabin crew that will take these items off you at these periods and return them after take-off and landing!
As for Vij’s comparison to WestJet: their Plus seating is more pitch, a blocked middle seat with a free sandwich and snack (and unlimited complimentary booze). AC’s long haul J service includes 4 hot meal choices in china dishes, and two premium red, 2 premium whites as well as expanded beverages (Cranberry juice and Perrier). WestJet continues to charge for meals in Y on their overseas flights, AC still provides complimentary hot meals with choice of entrée and free booze in Y on Asia and Europe flights (not US, Mexico or Caribbean).
Air Canada have revamped their pods in business class and the result is not good. They are narrower than before and taper very abruptly at the end, which means your feet are crammed together uncomfortably. I got very little sleep and had little luck distracting myself with the inflight entertainment,which now appears to be little more than an afterthought. The music choices were miserably poor: just four or five pieces in each category. On the plus side, the food was much better than a year ago.
Air Canada’s configuration is identical to United’s 737-800s up until the exit row — United also has 16 first class seats, and then nine rows of extra legroom economy seating, including the two exit rows (that’s a lot of preferred seats). However, Air Canada manages to squeeze in an extra three seats in the back behind the exit row, though that seems to be accomplished by putting the bathrooms at the very back, rather than in front of the rear exits. In other words, the galley space will be smaller and cabin will be bigger.
Lots of leg room. No place to store your "carry-on-personal-item", it has to go in the overhead bin which was full. So goodbye personal items. This aircraft has 3-4-3 seating in this row. I managed to get a two seat row on a previous flight. The aircraft seemed to be nose-up at altitude. I could not get my hip comfortable. I flew YVR to YYZ yesterday. I still have a cramp in my thigh( I'm 75 but not decrepit). I was more comfortable in Westjet premium economy on the way out. ( YYz to YVR) . I had an AC wrap for lunch which was awful.
✅ Trip Verified | The most uncomfortable long haul flight I have been on. I was seated in row 38, an aisle seat on the Boeing 787-9. I am fairly close to average size (barely 6 feet tall and 185 pounds), so not tiny but neither am I a giant by any means. My knees were just about touching the seat in front of me, the seats are very narrow, and thankfully the passenger seated in the middle seat was not large but he did fill the seat and needed all his elbow room. The seats are very short, offering little or no support to the thighs. This adds to the discomfort, particularly on a long flight. I could not stretch both my legs out fully at all while seated. Trying to use some of the aisle is next to impossible due to the extremely narrow aisles. There is barely room for the refreshment carts to pass. I spent a great deal of time on the flight moving my arm and shoulder inwards as the carts and other passengers were passing and bumping into me and there was no space. Seat backs are very thin and offer no support either. Due to all the factors mentioned, I found sleep to be impossible. The passenger at the window seat managed about an hour's sleep but basically had the same complaint, and needed muscle relaxers for her back towards the end of the flight. Anyone getting out of their seats found it necessary to pull on the seat in front of them for balance and leverage. For relief, I got up to stand and stretch at the rear of the plane 3 times on the eastbound flight and 4 times on the westbound leg. Also, on the outbound flight, our connection was a little late so we went straight to board our London flight without buying snacks, etc. Be warned, we found out on board that in economy you cannot buy snacks. You have to content yourself with the dinner and continental breakfast and I think you get a very small bag of pretzels with a drink. Cabin is beautiful. The in-flight entertainment system was excellent, although some people were asking why wi-fi was not available. The selection of movies, TV programs, and interactive games was OK for me. In summary, I will do everything I possibly can to avoid using this aircraft again. If it even means connecting through another city, I will do it. Three days later, I am still feeling the effects.
Bulkhead seats are are located immediately behind a solid cabin divider (on the PLAN below, Row 30, seats D/E/F/G/H/K). This is normally the location where a Bassinet is provided for families with babies, so can be noisier. Whilst you have no seat reclining in front of you, the legroom may at first seem spacious, but you will find that stretching your legs is not possible like in an ordinary seat. Bulkhead seats also suffer the fact that your tray table will be in the seat armrest, and this be cumbersome when left with a finished meal tray for long periods of time.
Seat is somewhat comfortable and still felt I had enough space when the person in front reclined. However, I would most definitely not like to experience this HD layout (3x4x3) long-haul. I saw passengers of a much bigger build than me, and they were squished like sardines; very little/no room to manoeuvre EXCEPT if you have an aisle seat; one side open for a little extra elbow room/leg room.
Berth numbering in sleepers and couchettes often causes confusion.  People with berth numbers 21 & 25 wonder if they're really together in the same 2-bed sleeper, when yes they are!  Look at the 'generic' sleeping-car numbering plan below, or search for the specific sleeper train you're booked on in the list below, based on the country in which your journey starts.  Adjacent compartments may have a communicating door when people travelling together occupy both compartments, for example 11/13/15 will often have a door through to 12/14/16, 21/23/25 will have a door to 22/24/26 and so on.
We flew LHR-YVR on this aircraft and were fortunate to have a whole row of 4 seats between the two of us, allowing us to spread out. If the row had been full, my companion in 61F would have been very squashed as the seats are quite narrow. The in-flight service was much better than I expected it to be - full meal departing LHR, mid-flight snack and ice-cream, then hot snack before arrival in YVR.

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✅ Trip Verified | We travelled Air Canada from Montreal to LAX yesterday in Business Class. The plane is a new Boeing 737. It seems like Air Canada is following the Rouge tradition by having the most uncomfortable seats imaginable even on a brand new plane. The thickness of the back cushion is very thin and there is a horizontal rod that is placed it seems to cause maximum discomfort. This flight is 6 hours! The foot rests are also extraordinarily cheap and won’t go down unless you get on your knees and manipulate it manually. Also, just like horrible Rouge, the seat posts are positioned so that you cannot store any hand luggage in front of your seat . The middle section has to be shared by seat neighbors. Air Canada used to be our favorite airline and now we have advised our travel agent to research any alternative to Air Canada and Rouge.
Flew Vancouver to Sydney (return) in business. Air Canada's new business class seats are awful. Lie flat seats are not even and not flat. I am 5'10" and I just fit; if you are taller, you cannot stretch out. But, most frustrating.... the fixed non-movable table means you cannot turn over or bend your legs to get more comfortable. They must get rid of that table for me to ever fly them again in an overnight flight. That said, food great, service great, entertainment OK. But back to the drawing board on bed/table, please.
Happy about their decision to keep the IFE! Was worried they would claim “everyone brings a phone/tablet with their own TV shows and movies” and cheap out like American did. AC is definitely one of the better airlines when it comes to installing IFE’s on pretty much their whole fleet. They even have IFE’s on their AC Express CRJ-700s! Only aircraft smaller than the CRJ-700s don’t have IFE’s and those fly short enough routes anyways.
Flew Vancouver to Sydney (return) in business. Air Canada's new business class seats are awful. Lie flat seats are not even and not flat. I am 5'10" and I just fit; if you are taller, you cannot stretch out. But, most frustrating.... the fixed non-movable table means you cannot turn over or bend your legs to get more comfortable. They must get rid of that table for me to ever fly them again in an overnight flight. That said, food great, service great, entertainment OK. But back to the drawing board on bed/table, please.
On many long haul aircraft, some passengers will find that their footspace (ie the area under the seat in front) is impacted by the location of the control box for the IFE (inflight entertainment). This is something that is gradually being changed and improved by seat suppliers, but don’t expect quick results. Across many airlines, this IFE control box might be located in the aisle seat footwell area, although for some it is the window or middle seat that suffers – so, no hard and fast rules here.
It's a very small and cramped little nook on the air plane. I spent the extra $ to book a emergency exit row, and this time I regretted. There's no windows but tons of leg room. Also, there's absolutely no space to stow away your personal item bag. I was also on the plane with another man who was tall and large build which also made it uncomfortable for both of us. There are tons of people constantly coming in and out and wiating in front of you to use the washroom, so it also disruptive. Wouldn't recommend this seat if you are trying to catch some sleep.
Flew Vancouver to Sydney (return) in business. Air Canada's new business class seats are awful. Lie flat seats are not even and not flat. I am 5'10" and I just fit; if you are taller, you cannot stretch out. But, most frustrating.... the fixed non-movable table means you cannot turn over or bend your legs to get more comfortable. They must get rid of that table for me to ever fly them again in an overnight flight. That said, food great, service great, entertainment OK. But back to the drawing board on bed/table, please.
✅ Trip Verified | The flight was too cramped up with no space for cabin luggage. My cabin bag had to be kept in the business class as they had no space. I remember pressing the button for air hostess help at least 4 times and every time no body showed and the request button was reset. Overall a bad experience and I would not recommend travelling with Air Canada.
If you are over 6" and weigh more than 200lbs, you will not fit in economy. Entire layout is designed for 5"11 & under 180lbs. Which is curious because the head room is ~10-11ft - crazy. You can stand comfortably if your 6'8, but can't sit. Another oddity; the overhead bin does not accommondate carry on's that are 1CM over lentgh minimums. Mine is .5CM (measured) over published Air Canada minimums and would not fit in overhead bin, even though on all Airbus, Embraer, Bombardier models the carry on fits fine. Ridiculous. Not sure on other rows, but the touch button control of lights etc. is on the inside of the armrest so rest assured your leg will often trigger lights on/off inadvertantly. Saw others with controls on the armrest itself (top) and heard complaints. If comfort/practicality are important, avoid this model.
We flew LHR-YVR on this aircraft and were fortunate to have a whole row of 4 seats between the two of us, allowing us to spread out. If the row had been full, my companion in 61F would have been very squashed as the seats are quite narrow. The in-flight service was much better than I expected it to be - full meal departing LHR, mid-flight snack and ice-cream, then hot snack before arrival in YVR.
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