Air Canada’s fleet, including the fleets of subsidiaries Air Canada Rouge and Air Canada Express, consists of 370 aircraft with 8 Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner, 13 Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner, 19 Boeing B777 300ER, 6 Boeing 777/200LR, 34 Boeing 767-300ER, 8 Airbus A330 300, 20 Airbus A321-200, 38 Airbus A319 100, 42 Airbus A320 200 Domestic, 25 Embraer E190, 20 Embraer E175, 16 Bombardier CRJ705, 30 Bombardier CRJ100/200, 42 Dash8 Q400, 26 Bombardier Dash 8-300, 23 Bombardier Dash 8-100.
We spend a lot of time getting our seating charts/seat maps right because we know how important they are when deciding which event to attend. When possible, we’ll provide you with photos of actual seat views from different locations in a venue. You can go to our Air Canada Centre seat views page to see them. Air Canada Centre can hold up to 19,800 people but that's a lot of seats and therefore a lot of potential seat views. We wish we had all 19,800 individual seat views for Air Canada Centre but we don't, therefore the seat views we show are usually a sample from different sections in a venue.
We flew LHR-YVR on this aircraft and were fortunate to have a whole row of 4 seats between the two of us, allowing us to spread out. If the row had been full, my companion in 61F would have been very squashed as the seats are quite narrow. The in-flight service was much better than I expected it to be - full meal departing LHR, mid-flight snack and ice-cream, then hot snack before arrival in YVR.
We spend a lot of time getting our seating charts/seat maps right because we know how important they are when deciding which event to attend. When possible, we’ll provide you with photos of actual seat views from different locations in a venue. You can go to our Air Canada Centre seat views page to see them. Air Canada Centre can hold up to 19,800 people but that's a lot of seats and therefore a lot of potential seat views. We wish we had all 19,800 individual seat views for Air Canada Centre but we don't, therefore the seat views we show are usually a sample from different sections in a venue.
Most airlines now charge an additional fee to sit in the exit rows, others will allocate at check-in (remarkably some airlines still favour these seats for much taller passengers!). You do get a lot more legroom in an exit seat, but on the downside there are a few points to remember. You will not be allowed to keep any items of hand-luggage (even books etc sometimes) by your seat/footwell area during landing and take-off periods, and as the bins above your seat may be full by the time you realise, you will have to hope for a cooperative cabin crew that will take these items off you at these periods and return them after take-off and landing!
Just flew on Air Canada’s 737 max 8 for the first time between Montreal and Vancouver in economy. I have flown Air Canada’s older A320, 777, 787 and CRJ900 and by comparison found myself for the first time having problems with leg room. I am 5’10 and my knees were already touching the seat in front. It seems like economy is really configured with seating of 30″ pitch, an economy seat spacing less that that of other Air Canada aircraft. I was traveling in the same row as a passenger seated by the aisle and at around 6′ height, he had to angle his legs other into the aisle or into the space of the middle seat passenger. Not the best situation. Considering the flight was about 5 hours in duration and that the same aircraft is used for transatlantic flights I find it hard to understand why Air Canada configured their aircraft in such a manner. Seat comfort isn’t the only issue. For passengers in economy it is necessary to access the aft cabin which is normally a zone separated for crew to work in the galley. Instead in this aircraft that space is now subdivided such that the right hand side of the aft cabin is devoted to the galley and the left hand side has access to two lavatories adjoined side by side. In line with the minimalist seating, the lavatories are also space savers featuring inward opening bi-fold doors. It has the same feeling as walking into a closet. To sum up the economy class experience flying the Air Canada 737 max 8 has less personal space and comfort compared to a regional jet that operates on flight durations that demand wide-body aircraft comfort.
If you are over 6" and weigh more than 200lbs, you will not fit in economy. Entire layout is designed for 5"11 & under 180lbs. Which is curious because the head room is ~10-11ft - crazy. You can stand comfortably if your 6'8, but can't sit. Another oddity; the overhead bin does not accommondate carry on's that are 1CM over lentgh minimums. Mine is .5CM (measured) over published Air Canada minimums and would not fit in overhead bin, even though on all Airbus, Embraer, Bombardier models the carry on fits fine. Ridiculous. Not sure on other rows, but the touch button control of lights etc. is on the inside of the armrest so rest assured your leg will often trigger lights on/off inadvertantly. Saw others with controls on the armrest itself (top) and heard complaints. If comfort/practicality are important, avoid this model.
These planes are configured in two classes of service, with very nice lie-flat sleeper suites in Executive First Class. Pioneered by Virgin Atlantic, the seats are arranged in a herringbone fashion, angled at about 45 degrees to the direction of flight, and might take a little getting used to. Due to the angle of the seats, those that want a view out the window will really have to turn their head. However, every seat is an aisle seat and there is no need to climb over your neighbor or wake them in the middle of the flight.
Airline seat pitch guides give you an indication of how much legroom you can expect. Economy class cabins on long haul flights generally offer 31 to 32 inches seat pitch (the industry standard), with a smaller number of airlines providing 33 to 35 inches of seat pitch. The higher the seat pitch, the fewer the number of seats an airline can fit into the cabin, so in present economic times do not expect to see airlines increasing seat pitch standards! It is important to remember that newer “slimline” seats do mean that a 32 inch seat pitch can offer as much personal legroom space as an older type of seat in a 34 inch seat pitch.
Flying these days is often a huge hassle: You have to get to the airport early to make sure you get through security in time, and then there's the issue of the flight itself. One of the biggest issues related to your comfort and a pleasant trip is where you sit: how much legroom the seat has, how wide it is, and how much overhead bin space there is above you for your carry-on luggage. Other considerations include trying to avoid the middle seat in a group of three, getting your preference for a window or an aisle seat, and sitting close to the front of the section so you can deplane more quickly. If you pick a good seat, it makes the whole journey a lot better.
Air Canada’s fleet, including the fleets of subsidiaries Air Canada Rouge and Air Canada Express, consists of 370 aircraft with 8 Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner, 13 Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner, 19 Boeing B777 300ER, 6 Boeing 777/200LR, 34 Boeing 767-300ER, 8 Airbus A330 300, 20 Airbus A321-200, 38 Airbus A319 100, 42 Airbus A320 200 Domestic, 25 Embraer E190, 20 Embraer E175, 16 Bombardier CRJ705, 30 Bombardier CRJ100/200, 42 Dash8 Q400, 26 Bombardier Dash 8-300, 23 Bombardier Dash 8-100.
In addition, due to cramming so many seats into the Econ, there's less lavatories (long line-ups), no duty free onboard (no room), not enough room for carryon, and very poor service with long waits for food. Carryon bins were full half way through the boarding and it was chaos trying to fit your stuff. Forget about bringing 2 bags or jacket with you expecting it to fit overhead, meaning you need to keep those in your tiny seat further making it less comfortable.

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On many long haul aircraft, some passengers will find that their footspace (ie the area under the seat in front) is impacted by the location of the control box for the IFE (inflight entertainment). This is something that is gradually being changed and improved by seat suppliers, but don’t expect quick results. Across many airlines, this IFE control box might be located in the aisle seat footwell area, although for some it is the window or middle seat that suffers – so, no hard and fast rules here.
Basically, Air Canada has decided to shove more seats in every class onto this aircraft at the expense of comfort and space, and every passenger is short-changed as a result. The 777-300ER that normally takes 359 passengers is being converted to 458 passengers - mine was one of them. The passenger loses. I have read that it is a plan to reduce cost per seat by 15%. It is a total disgrace - avoid this aircraft at all costs. Air Canada used to be a great airline but it is heading downhill. I have sent two emails, two letters to the LHR office and two letters to Calin Rovinescu: the CEO of Air Canada. No reply of any kind has been received to date. Air Canada really doesn't care anymore. If this is the way Air Canada is going, then it's time to change airlines folks.
Happy about their decision to keep the IFE! Was worried they would claim “everyone brings a phone/tablet with their own TV shows and movies” and cheap out like American did. AC is definitely one of the better airlines when it comes to installing IFE’s on pretty much their whole fleet. They even have IFE’s on their AC Express CRJ-700s! Only aircraft smaller than the CRJ-700s don’t have IFE’s and those fly short enough routes anyways.
✅ Trip Verified | The most uncomfortable long haul flight I have been on. I was seated in row 38, an aisle seat on the Boeing 787-9. I am fairly close to average size (barely 6 feet tall and 185 pounds), so not tiny but neither am I a giant by any means. My knees were just about touching the seat in front of me, the seats are very narrow, and thankfully the passenger seated in the middle seat was not large but he did fill the seat and needed all his elbow room. The seats are very short, offering little or no support to the thighs. This adds to the discomfort, particularly on a long flight. I could not stretch both my legs out fully at all while seated. Trying to use some of the aisle is next to impossible due to the extremely narrow aisles. There is barely room for the refreshment carts to pass. I spent a great deal of time on the flight moving my arm and shoulder inwards as the carts and other passengers were passing and bumping into me and there was no space. Seat backs are very thin and offer no support either. Due to all the factors mentioned, I found sleep to be impossible. The passenger at the window seat managed about an hour's sleep but basically had the same complaint, and needed muscle relaxers for her back towards the end of the flight. Anyone getting out of their seats found it necessary to pull on the seat in front of them for balance and leverage. For relief, I got up to stand and stretch at the rear of the plane 3 times on the eastbound flight and 4 times on the westbound leg. Also, on the outbound flight, our connection was a little late so we went straight to board our London flight without buying snacks, etc. Be warned, we found out on board that in economy you cannot buy snacks. You have to content yourself with the dinner and continental breakfast and I think you get a very small bag of pretzels with a drink. Cabin is beautiful. The in-flight entertainment system was excellent, although some people were asking why wi-fi was not available. The selection of movies, TV programs, and interactive games was OK for me. In summary, I will do everything I possibly can to avoid using this aircraft again. If it even means connecting through another city, I will do it. Three days later, I am still feeling the effects.
Basically, Air Canada has decided to shove more seats in every class onto this aircraft at the expense of comfort and space, and every passenger is short-changed as a result. The 777-300ER that normally takes 359 passengers is being converted to 458 passengers - mine was one of them. The passenger loses. I have read that it is a plan to reduce cost per seat by 15%. It is a total disgrace - avoid this aircraft at all costs. Air Canada used to be a great airline but it is heading downhill. I have sent two emails, two letters to the LHR office and two letters to Calin Rovinescu: the CEO of Air Canada. No reply of any kind has been received to date. Air Canada really doesn't care anymore. If this is the way Air Canada is going, then it's time to change airlines folks.
This is the row just before the lavatories. Seats do not recline, however the seats in row in front (22) do, which makes the right space even tighter, the screen is right in your face if the person in front of you decides to have the seat back for the whole flight, in my case for 8 hours. Not possible to watch anything in this position. Very hard in your back. I also had the…
Air Canada’s fleet, including the fleets of subsidiaries Air Canada Rouge and Air Canada Express, consists of 370 aircraft with 8 Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner, 13 Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner, 19 Boeing B777 300ER, 6 Boeing 777/200LR, 34 Boeing 767-300ER, 8 Airbus A330 300, 20 Airbus A321-200, 38 Airbus A319 100, 42 Airbus A320 200 Domestic, 25 Embraer E190, 20 Embraer E175, 16 Bombardier CRJ705, 30 Bombardier CRJ100/200, 42 Dash8 Q400, 26 Bombardier Dash 8-300, 23 Bombardier Dash 8-100.
Expert Flyer offers free and pro subscriptions. Under free, travelers can use the website to find a better seat by entering their flight information and creating an alert when a more desirable seat becomes available. Under pro, there are basic and premium levels that offer services that include data for more than 400 airlines, detailed seat maps, and the ability to search for awards and upgrades. Users can also download free iOS and Android apps that offer the same service.
This was supposed to be an A330-300, however, the configuration was different than the seat choice map. This seems to be pretty common for Air Canada. The last time I flew this route it was in premium economy, however the premium economy had 4 seats in the middle and the "extra" legroom was not any better or worth the money over regular coach, so thought I would try bulkhead, row 18. I am not sure it was worth the seat cost. The person next to me asked to be moved even though he paid extra for the seat because he had a broken foot and it was more uncomfortable than regular economy where you can put your feet under the seat in front of you. This row perhaps had a bit more space from the back of the seat to the bulkhead, however the extra space for knees does not help your feet, and all bags need to go overhead. Having the seat next to me empty meant I could fold my legs over the tray table armrest that was not movable and stretch out a bit to sleep.
Seating plans have a wide range of purposes. At formal dinners, they are usually used to avoid chaos and confusion upon entrance and to follow the etiquette. In this case, it is customary to arrange the host and hostess at the opposite sides of the table, and alternate male and female guests throughout.[1] Place cards can be used to direct guests. State dinners have their own protocol and arrangements are made so that the most distinguished guests can have the possibility to engage in conversation. Plans are also made for airplanes, where the objective is to differentiate passengers between the various travel classes and ensure everybody has a place. Similarly, theatres or cinemas may allow spectators to choose their seats beforehand. A seating plan is of crucial importance for musical ensembles or orchestras, where every type of instrument is allocated a specific section.[2]
Seating plans have a wide range of purposes. At formal dinners, they are usually used to avoid chaos and confusion upon entrance and to follow the etiquette. In this case, it is customary to arrange the host and hostess at the opposite sides of the table, and alternate male and female guests throughout.[1] Place cards can be used to direct guests. State dinners have their own protocol and arrangements are made so that the most distinguished guests can have the possibility to engage in conversation. Plans are also made for airplanes, where the objective is to differentiate passengers between the various travel classes and ensure everybody has a place. Similarly, theatres or cinemas may allow spectators to choose their seats beforehand. A seating plan is of crucial importance for musical ensembles or orchestras, where every type of instrument is allocated a specific section.[2]
✅ Trip Verified | We travelled Air Canada from Montreal to LAX yesterday in Business Class. The plane is a new Boeing 737. It seems like Air Canada is following the Rouge tradition by having the most uncomfortable seats imaginable even on a brand new plane. The thickness of the back cushion is very thin and there is a horizontal rod that is placed it seems to cause maximum discomfort. This flight is 6 hours! The foot rests are also extraordinarily cheap and won’t go down unless you get on your knees and manipulate it manually. Also, just like horrible Rouge, the seat posts are positioned so that you cannot store any hand luggage in front of your seat . The middle section has to be shared by seat neighbors. Air Canada used to be our favorite airline and now we have advised our travel agent to research any alternative to Air Canada and Rouge.
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