Another important point with the extended space around the exit rows, is that on some flights you might find that passengers from elsewhere in the cabin decide that this is a good place to congregate and chat, do their stretching exercises etc, and it can therefore prove a rather busy place. It is also always worth watching out for those middle seat rows in the aircraft that look like there is a lot of legroom – this might be the case, but you can find that your hoped for space in front is being used as a cabin cross-over passage, as passengers go to the washrooms etc.

While not surprising, Air Canada will sell the forward cabin of these transatlantic flights as business class, even though the seat isn’t really competitive internationally. Pricing seems to be comparable to what you’d pay for a flat bed on a 777 or 787. For example, a roundtrip ticket between Toronto and Shannon will run you ~$2,900. Logically it seems like they should market it as premium economy in terms of the product offering, but I guess they do this because they can get away with it.
Air Canada have revamped their pods in business class and the result is not good. They are narrower than before and taper very abruptly at the end, which means your feet are crammed together uncomfortably. I got very little sleep and had little luck distracting myself with the inflight entertainment,which now appears to be little more than an afterthought. The music choices were miserably poor: just four or five pieces in each category. On the plus side, the food was much better than a year ago.
✅ Trip Verified | The most uncomfortable long haul flight I have been on. I was seated in row 38, an aisle seat on the Boeing 787-9. I am fairly close to average size (barely 6 feet tall and 185 pounds), so not tiny but neither am I a giant by any means. My knees were just about touching the seat in front of me, the seats are very narrow, and thankfully the passenger seated in the middle seat was not large but he did fill the seat and needed all his elbow room. The seats are very short, offering little or no support to the thighs. This adds to the discomfort, particularly on a long flight. I could not stretch both my legs out fully at all while seated. Trying to use some of the aisle is next to impossible due to the extremely narrow aisles. There is barely room for the refreshment carts to pass. I spent a great deal of time on the flight moving my arm and shoulder inwards as the carts and other passengers were passing and bumping into me and there was no space. Seat backs are very thin and offer no support either. Due to all the factors mentioned, I found sleep to be impossible. The passenger at the window seat managed about an hour's sleep but basically had the same complaint, and needed muscle relaxers for her back towards the end of the flight. Anyone getting out of their seats found it necessary to pull on the seat in front of them for balance and leverage. For relief, I got up to stand and stretch at the rear of the plane 3 times on the eastbound flight and 4 times on the westbound leg. Also, on the outbound flight, our connection was a little late so we went straight to board our London flight without buying snacks, etc. Be warned, we found out on board that in economy you cannot buy snacks. You have to content yourself with the dinner and continental breakfast and I think you get a very small bag of pretzels with a drink. Cabin is beautiful. The in-flight entertainment system was excellent, although some people were asking why wi-fi was not available. The selection of movies, TV programs, and interactive games was OK for me. In summary, I will do everything I possibly can to avoid using this aircraft again. If it even means connecting through another city, I will do it. Three days later, I am still feeling the effects.
Expert Flyer offers free and pro subscriptions. Under free, travelers can use the website to find a better seat by entering their flight information and creating an alert when a more desirable seat becomes available. Under pro, there are basic and premium levels that offer services that include data for more than 400 airlines, detailed seat maps, and the ability to search for awards and upgrades. Users can also download free iOS and Android apps that offer the same service.
The new business class studio pod is TERRIBLE - narrow, short and ridiculously sized and shaped. It's okay as a seat, but I paid for a good night's sleep. Forget it! I'm 6ft 4 and when the seat turns into a bed, it slides the lower half of your body into a tiny plastic coffin-like box (in the area under the armrests of the two passengers in front) with no room to move your legs at all, and it wasn't long enough for me - so it wasn't humanly possible to lie down!! Hell on earth. As a result, I arrived at LHR tired and irritable, lacking the sleep I had needed and deliberately paid for. The cabin crew was brilliant, but they told me that a lot of other business class passengers had complained about this new seat. It's also difficult to get the seat back up again from a supposed "bed". My seat 2A on C-FIVO was also missing a seat-based flexible reading light. It is a reasonably new aircraft so why on earth was that missing?
You'll often find train formation plans posted in glass cases on station platforms so that you know where on the platform to stand to board your particular car.  These show the train make-up with carriage sequence and carriage numbering for specific train departures, listed by train number. Unfortunately, train operators don't usually provide this information online, but there are a couple of useful private sites that show this information, often with photos of what the cars look like:
Upon payment of the seat selection fee, Air Transat will assign you your requested seat. No refund will be provided should a passenger cancel their seat selection prior to travel. In the event of an aircraft substitution, Air Transat will assign an equivalent seat. If a passenger does not receive an equivalent seat, they will be entitled to a refund of their seat selection fee. To receive a refund, the passenger must submit a copy of their boarding pass, along with their contact information, within 30 days of their return flight. Any request for a refund made after this deadline or without all the required information will not be processed. Air Transat’s liability is limited to refunding the fees associated with seat selection.
The aisle seat gives you easy access to walk around, but worth remembering that you might be getting up and down for your fellow passenger seated next to you. The aisle seat positions can also be prone to knocks and bumps as passengers walk past or try to squeeze past service carts in the cabin – you often find out in an aisle seat how inconsiderate some fellow travellers can really be!

I am 6'5" tall, and these biz class seats are too short for lie-flat seating. Besides being too short, they taper uncomfortably at the feet, which reminds me of squeezing into a test tube or a mummy sleeping bag. For mostly-reclined seating the seat is OK, although the bottom cushion is too thin and I could feel the hard support beneath it. Lack of lumbar support, while true, didn't bother me too much. On the plus side, the light in the foot well is thoughtful, and I found the other lighting more than adequate. A dimmer control for the bright reading light would be good. The storage space for small stuff was very good.


Some trains have seats in open-plan saloons, indeed most modern trains have this sort of seating.  Some trains, often older ones and often in eastern Europe, have seats in traditional 6-seater compartments with a side corridor running the length of the car.  There are sliding (but non-lockable) doors to each compartment.  Very occasionally you'll find both sorts of seating on one train, and some booking systems (such as the German Railways site bahn.de or Austrian site oebb.at) will ask you which you prefer.  Unless you're in a group of 5 or 6 people, most travellers prefer open-plan saloon seating, which also gives you a better view out as you can view diagonally forwards and backwards through all the coach windows, not just directly sideways through your own window.

We spend a lot of time getting our seating charts/seat maps right because we know how important they are when deciding which event to attend. When possible, we’ll provide you with photos of actual seat views from different locations in a venue. You can go to our Air Canada Centre seat views page to see them. Air Canada Centre can hold up to 19,800 people but that's a lot of seats and therefore a lot of potential seat views. We wish we had all 19,800 individual seat views for Air Canada Centre but we don't, therefore the seat views we show are usually a sample from different sections in a venue.


It's a very small and cramped little nook on the air plane. I spent the extra $ to book a emergency exit row, and this time I regretted. There's no windows but tons of leg room. Also, there's absolutely no space to stow away your personal item bag. I was also on the plane with another man who was tall and large build which also made it uncomfortable for both of us. There are tons of people constantly coming in and out and wiating in front of you to use the washroom, so it also disruptive. Wouldn't recommend this seat if you are trying to catch some sleep.
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