✅ Trip Verified | The most uncomfortable long haul flight I have been on. I was seated in row 38, an aisle seat on the Boeing 787-9. I am fairly close to average size (barely 6 feet tall and 185 pounds), so not tiny but neither am I a giant by any means. My knees were just about touching the seat in front of me, the seats are very narrow, and thankfully the passenger seated in the middle seat was not large but he did fill the seat and needed all his elbow room. The seats are very short, offering little or no support to the thighs. This adds to the discomfort, particularly on a long flight. I could not stretch both my legs out fully at all while seated. Trying to use some of the aisle is next to impossible due to the extremely narrow aisles. There is barely room for the refreshment carts to pass. I spent a great deal of time on the flight moving my arm and shoulder inwards as the carts and other passengers were passing and bumping into me and there was no space. Seat backs are very thin and offer no support either. Due to all the factors mentioned, I found sleep to be impossible. The passenger at the window seat managed about an hour's sleep but basically had the same complaint, and needed muscle relaxers for her back towards the end of the flight. Anyone getting out of their seats found it necessary to pull on the seat in front of them for balance and leverage. For relief, I got up to stand and stretch at the rear of the plane 3 times on the eastbound flight and 4 times on the westbound leg. Also, on the outbound flight, our connection was a little late so we went straight to board our London flight without buying snacks, etc. Be warned, we found out on board that in economy you cannot buy snacks. You have to content yourself with the dinner and continental breakfast and I think you get a very small bag of pretzels with a drink. Cabin is beautiful. The in-flight entertainment system was excellent, although some people were asking why wi-fi was not available. The selection of movies, TV programs, and interactive games was OK for me. In summary, I will do everything I possibly can to avoid using this aircraft again. If it even means connecting through another city, I will do it. Three days later, I am still feeling the effects. 

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The aisle seat gives you easy access to walk around, but worth remembering that you might be getting up and down for your fellow passenger seated next to you. The aisle seat positions can also be prone to knocks and bumps as passengers walk past or try to squeeze past service carts in the cabin – you often find out in an aisle seat how inconsiderate some fellow travellers can really be!
Most airlines now charge an additional fee to sit in the exit rows, others will allocate at check-in (remarkably some airlines still favour these seats for much taller passengers!). You do get a lot more legroom in an exit seat, but on the downside there are a few points to remember. You will not be allowed to keep any items of hand-luggage (even books etc sometimes) by your seat/footwell area during landing and take-off periods, and as the bins above your seat may be full by the time you realise, you will have to hope for a cooperative cabin crew that will take these items off you at these periods and return them after take-off and landing!

Bulkhead seats are are located immediately behind a solid cabin divider (on the PLAN below, Row 30, seats D/E/F/G/H/K). This is normally the location where a Bassinet is provided for families with babies, so can be noisier. Whilst you have no seat reclining in front of you, the legroom may at first seem spacious, but you will find that stretching your legs is not possible like in an ordinary seat. Bulkhead seats also suffer the fact that your tray table will be in the seat armrest, and this be cumbersome when left with a finished meal tray for long periods of time.


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Seating plans have a wide range of purposes. At formal dinners, they are usually used to avoid chaos and confusion upon entrance and to follow the etiquette. In this case, it is customary to arrange the host and hostess at the opposite sides of the table, and alternate male and female guests throughout.[1] Place cards can be used to direct guests. State dinners have their own protocol and arrangements are made so that the most distinguished guests can have the possibility to engage in conversation. Plans are also made for airplanes, where the objective is to differentiate passengers between the various travel classes and ensure everybody has a place. Similarly, theatres or cinemas may allow spectators to choose their seats beforehand. A seating plan is of crucial importance for musical ensembles or orchestras, where every type of instrument is allocated a specific section.[2]
Happy about their decision to keep the IFE! Was worried they would claim “everyone brings a phone/tablet with their own TV shows and movies” and cheap out like American did. AC is definitely one of the better airlines when it comes to installing IFE’s on pretty much their whole fleet. They even have IFE’s on their AC Express CRJ-700s! Only aircraft smaller than the CRJ-700s don’t have IFE’s and those fly short enough routes anyways.
The aisle seat gives you easy access to walk around, but worth remembering that you might be getting up and down for your fellow passenger seated next to you. The aisle seat positions can also be prone to knocks and bumps as passengers walk past or try to squeeze past service carts in the cabin – you often find out in an aisle seat how inconsiderate some fellow travellers can really be!

✅ Verified Review | A330 seats are extremely uncomfortable. Airlines need to have a 'use-by' date on seat bottoms as older aircraft have seat bottoms which show a high degree of wear. It would seem a low cost to at least build in better cushioning in seats where the flights are 10 hours or more. Feels like some form of torture to make passengers sit in seats like this. A/V system is also very dated and laggy. Reinvest some of your profits in improved seats and a/V systems. Aisles ridiculously narrow.


✅ Trip Verified | The most uncomfortable long haul flight I have been on. I was seated in row 38, an aisle seat on the Boeing 787-9. I am fairly close to average size (barely 6 feet tall and 185 pounds), so not tiny but neither am I a giant by any means. My knees were just about touching the seat in front of me, the seats are very narrow, and thankfully the passenger seated in the middle seat was not large but he did fill the seat and needed all his elbow room. The seats are very short, offering little or no support to the thighs. This adds to the discomfort, particularly on a long flight. I could not stretch both my legs out fully at all while seated. Trying to use some of the aisle is next to impossible due to the extremely narrow aisles. There is barely room for the refreshment carts to pass. I spent a great deal of time on the flight moving my arm and shoulder inwards as the carts and other passengers were passing and bumping into me and there was no space. Seat backs are very thin and offer no support either. Due to all the factors mentioned, I found sleep to be impossible. The passenger at the window seat managed about an hour's sleep but basically had the same complaint, and needed muscle relaxers for her back towards the end of the flight. Anyone getting out of their seats found it necessary to pull on the seat in front of them for balance and leverage. For relief, I got up to stand and stretch at the rear of the plane 3 times on the eastbound flight and 4 times on the westbound leg. Also, on the outbound flight, our connection was a little late so we went straight to board our London flight without buying snacks, etc. Be warned, we found out on board that in economy you cannot buy snacks. You have to content yourself with the dinner and continental breakfast and I think you get a very small bag of pretzels with a drink. Cabin is beautiful. The in-flight entertainment system was excellent, although some people were asking why wi-fi was not available. The selection of movies, TV programs, and interactive games was OK for me. In summary, I will do everything I possibly can to avoid using this aircraft again. If it even means connecting through another city, I will do it. Three days later, I am still feeling the effects.
Airline seat pitch guides give you an indication of how much legroom you can expect. Economy class cabins on long haul flights generally offer 31 to 32 inches seat pitch (the industry standard), with a smaller number of airlines providing 33 to 35 inches of seat pitch. The higher the seat pitch, the fewer the number of seats an airline can fit into the cabin, so in present economic times do not expect to see airlines increasing seat pitch standards! It is important to remember that newer “slimline” seats do mean that a 32 inch seat pitch can offer as much personal legroom space as an older type of seat in a 34 inch seat pitch.
Just flew on Air Canada’s 737 max 8 for the first time between Montreal and Vancouver in economy. I have flown Air Canada’s older A320, 777, 787 and CRJ900 and by comparison found myself for the first time having problems with leg room. I am 5’10 and my knees were already touching the seat in front. It seems like economy is really configured with seating of 30″ pitch, an economy seat spacing less that that of other Air Canada aircraft. I was traveling in the same row as a passenger seated by the aisle and at around 6′ height, he had to angle his legs other into the aisle or into the space of the middle seat passenger. Not the best situation. Considering the flight was about 5 hours in duration and that the same aircraft is used for transatlantic flights I find it hard to understand why Air Canada configured their aircraft in such a manner. Seat comfort isn’t the only issue. For passengers in economy it is necessary to access the aft cabin which is normally a zone separated for crew to work in the galley. Instead in this aircraft that space is now subdivided such that the right hand side of the aft cabin is devoted to the galley and the left hand side has access to two lavatories adjoined side by side. In line with the minimalist seating, the lavatories are also space savers featuring inward opening bi-fold doors. It has the same feeling as walking into a closet. To sum up the economy class experience flying the Air Canada 737 max 8 has less personal space and comfort compared to a regional jet that operates on flight durations that demand wide-body aircraft comfort.
On the way back from HKG, I paid up and got the Business Class (can't remember the seat#, it was window). While obviously it is a much improved seat versus Econ, the layout, and setup is horrendous for a business class charging thousands. The seat is so uncomfortable in any seating position you try to constantly adjust it, your knee hits the side of the seat, and if you get unlucky and get a window seat, you literally must climb over the passenger next to you to get out, are you kidding me? Further, due to more seats cramped the service is suffered compared to regular 777, 330, or 767.
@Lucky: “While I imagine these planes will still be primarily used for shorter flights, the decision to fly them transatlantic is interesting.” AC uses these for everything and anything since they freely swap between their widebodies and narrowbodies on flights in North America. So, in other words, we’ll be riding this from Halifax to Vancouver (5.5 hours), Montreal to SFO (5 hours), etc. etc. Lots of looooong flights, so I don’t see why they similarly lengthy European flight is any different.
✅ Trip Verified | We travelled Air Canada from Montreal to LAX yesterday in Business Class. The plane is a new Boeing 737. It seems like Air Canada is following the Rouge tradition by having the most uncomfortable seats imaginable even on a brand new plane. The thickness of the back cushion is very thin and there is a horizontal rod that is placed it seems to cause maximum discomfort. This flight is 6 hours! The foot rests are also extraordinarily cheap and won’t go down unless you get on your knees and manipulate it manually. Also, just like horrible Rouge, the seat posts are positioned so that you cannot store any hand luggage in front of your seat . The middle section has to be shared by seat neighbors. Air Canada used to be our favorite airline and now we have advised our travel agent to research any alternative to Air Canada and Rouge.
I will be flying on this plane from Montreal to London in July. There will be three of us in row 28 ABC - my son will have the window, I will be in the middle and my husband will have the aisle. There are two sections after premium economy, ours is the first one. I see on the SeatGuru website that the seats behind us have alerts - they back onto the exit door area and have limited recline ability. Hence, will this mean I will have limited recline ability unless I want to be a jerk and lean back into someone's face while I sleep through a night flight?
While not surprising, Air Canada will sell the forward cabin of these transatlantic flights as business class, even though the seat isn’t really competitive internationally. Pricing seems to be comparable to what you’d pay for a flat bed on a 777 or 787. For example, a roundtrip ticket between Toronto and Shannon will run you ~$2,900. Logically it seems like they should market it as premium economy in terms of the product offering, but I guess they do this because they can get away with it.

✅ Trip Verified | We travelled Air Canada from Montreal to LAX yesterday in Business Class. The plane is a new Boeing 737. It seems like Air Canada is following the Rouge tradition by having the most uncomfortable seats imaginable even on a brand new plane. The thickness of the back cushion is very thin and there is a horizontal rod that is placed it seems to cause maximum discomfort. This flight is 6 hours! The foot rests are also extraordinarily cheap and won’t go down unless you get on your knees and manipulate it manually. Also, just like horrible Rouge, the seat posts are positioned so that you cannot store any hand luggage in front of your seat . The middle section has to be shared by seat neighbors. Air Canada used to be our favorite airline and now we have advised our travel agent to research any alternative to Air Canada and Rouge.


✅ Trip Verified | We travelled Air Canada from Montreal to LAX yesterday in Business Class. The plane is a new Boeing 737. It seems like Air Canada is following the Rouge tradition by having the most uncomfortable seats imaginable even on a brand new plane. The thickness of the back cushion is very thin and there is a horizontal rod that is placed it seems to cause maximum discomfort. This flight is 6 hours! The foot rests are also extraordinarily cheap and won’t go down unless you get on your knees and manipulate it manually. Also, just like horrible Rouge, the seat posts are positioned so that you cannot store any hand luggage in front of your seat . The middle section has to be shared by seat neighbors. Air Canada used to be our favorite airline and now we have advised our travel agent to research any alternative to Air Canada and Rouge.
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