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Flew Vancouver to Sydney (return) in business. Air Canada's new business class seats are awful. Lie flat seats are not even and not flat. I am 5'10" and I just fit; if you are taller, you cannot stretch out. But, most frustrating.... the fixed non-movable table means you cannot turn over or bend your legs to get more comfortable. They must get rid of that table for me to ever fly them again in an overnight flight. That said, food great, service great, entertainment OK. But back to the drawing board on bed/table, please. 

Expert Flyer offers free and pro subscriptions. Under free, travelers can use the website to find a better seat by entering their flight information and creating an alert when a more desirable seat becomes available. Under pro, there are basic and premium levels that offer services that include data for more than 400 airlines, detailed seat maps, and the ability to search for awards and upgrades. Users can also download free iOS and Android apps that offer the same service.
When booking online, a few operators allow you to book a specific seat from a graphic numbered seating plan if you book directly on their own website - such operators include Eurostar at www.eurostar.com (only after payment, using the 'manage a booking' link), German Railways at www.bahn.de (but only for German domestic journeys on German IC or ICE trains), Swedish Railways at www.sj.se, Spanish railways at www.renfe.com (but only for Spanish domestic journeys and only if you buy a Promo+ fare or higher) and a few others.  But these tend to be the exceptions, it's only for their own trains in their own country, and if you buy from a third party site you won't get that functionality, it's only if you book with the operator directly at their own site.  Most other booking sites only let you choose 'aisle' or 'window'.  If you want to book a specific seat on any other train, you'll need to book by phone, preferably with an agency that uses the relevant country's own reservation system.  For example, if you call SNCF or (in the USA or Canada) Rail Europe, these use the French Railways reservation & ticketing system and can easily book a specific seat on a French TGV.  But they can usually only select basic options such as 'aisle' or 'window' when booking a German or Italian or Spanish train.  Conversely, the German Railways UK office obviously uses the German reservation and ticketing system, they can easily book you a specific seat or type of seat on a German ICE, but can only access basic options such as 'aisle' or 'window' on Eurostar or on a French or Italian train.  There's a list of UK booking agencies here, if you really want to book a specific seat then try calling an agency with the most relevant reservation system.
Just flew on Air Canada’s 737 max 8 for the first time between Montreal and Vancouver in economy. I have flown Air Canada’s older A320, 777, 787 and CRJ900 and by comparison found myself for the first time having problems with leg room. I am 5’10 and my knees were already touching the seat in front. It seems like economy is really configured with seating of 30″ pitch, an economy seat spacing less that that of other Air Canada aircraft. I was traveling in the same row as a passenger seated by the aisle and at around 6′ height, he had to angle his legs other into the aisle or into the space of the middle seat passenger. Not the best situation. Considering the flight was about 5 hours in duration and that the same aircraft is used for transatlantic flights I find it hard to understand why Air Canada configured their aircraft in such a manner. Seat comfort isn’t the only issue. For passengers in economy it is necessary to access the aft cabin which is normally a zone separated for crew to work in the galley. Instead in this aircraft that space is now subdivided such that the right hand side of the aft cabin is devoted to the galley and the left hand side has access to two lavatories adjoined side by side. In line with the minimalist seating, the lavatories are also space savers featuring inward opening bi-fold doors. It has the same feeling as walking into a closet. To sum up the economy class experience flying the Air Canada 737 max 8 has less personal space and comfort compared to a regional jet that operates on flight durations that demand wide-body aircraft comfort.

Being seated next to or opposite the Galley areas can also be a bad choice – you will find that the level of pedestrian traffic (cabin staff and passengers) is much higher, the curtains may not always be kept shut so you get light intrusion, and as hard as staff might try, the preparation and clearance of meals will result in the galleys being quite noisy for these periods of the flight.

Flew Vancouver to Sydney (return) in business. Air Canada's new business class seats are awful. Lie flat seats are not even and not flat. I am 5'10" and I just fit; if you are taller, you cannot stretch out. But, most frustrating.... the fixed non-movable table means you cannot turn over or bend your legs to get more comfortable. They must get rid of that table for me to ever fly them again in an overnight flight. That said, food great, service great, entertainment OK. But back to the drawing board on bed/table, please.

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This is a matter of personal choice, but on widebody aircraft you will generally find that the front of the Economy cabin is the quietest, normally just in front of the aircraft engines. The rear of the cabin tends to be noisiest from an engine noise perspective, and this also tends to bump around more during turbulence – of course, on less than full flights, you normally find that there are more empty seats at the back of the plane where you can spread out. For the meal services, it is difficult to suggest where you are more likely to be offered the full choice of meals before they run out! Some airlines start meal services from the front of the cabin, some the middle, and a few from the back of the cabin!
Awful!! This flight was 12 hours from Tokyo direct to Toronto. Seats VERY narrow and limited leg room. My legs in 34B kept going numb due to the uncomfortable angle of the seats. The tray was slightly larger than my iPad and impossibly small food trays left no room to put your drink (tray completely covered the tray's beverage indent). When passenger in front reclined, tray was on an angle. We will never again fly on this aircraft!
We were due to sit in 5H&K but on boarding were switched to 1H&K. I had read many poor reviews about this version of the 777. To be honest, it wasn't nearly as bad as led to believe. I'm 5'10" and 180lb so can't speak for others. Seats were firm but comfortable and it was easy to adjust them to find a comfortable position. The cubby hole for feet was decent enough. IFE was quick and responsive. Tray tables quirky and took a bit of working out . Meals and service were very good. Friendly flight attendants. I understand that this seating will be replaced with that used on Air Canada's 787's.
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It's a very small and cramped little nook on the air plane. I spent the extra $ to book a emergency exit row, and this time I regretted. There's no windows but tons of leg room. Also, there's absolutely no space to stow away your personal item bag. I was also on the plane with another man who was tall and large build which also made it uncomfortable for both of us. There are tons of people constantly coming in and out and wiating in front of you to use the washroom, so it also disruptive. Wouldn't recommend this seat if you are trying to catch some sleep.
✅ Trip Verified | We travelled Air Canada from Montreal to LAX yesterday in Business Class. The plane is a new Boeing 737. It seems like Air Canada is following the Rouge tradition by having the most uncomfortable seats imaginable even on a brand new plane. The thickness of the back cushion is very thin and there is a horizontal rod that is placed it seems to cause maximum discomfort. This flight is 6 hours! The foot rests are also extraordinarily cheap and won’t go down unless you get on your knees and manipulate it manually. Also, just like horrible Rouge, the seat posts are positioned so that you cannot store any hand luggage in front of your seat . The middle section has to be shared by seat neighbors. Air Canada used to be our favorite airline and now we have advised our travel agent to research any alternative to Air Canada and Rouge.
As for Vij’s comparison to WestJet: their Plus seating is more pitch, a blocked middle seat with a free sandwich and snack (and unlimited complimentary booze). AC’s long haul J service includes 4 hot meal choices in china dishes, and two premium red, 2 premium whites as well as expanded beverages (Cranberry juice and Perrier). WestJet continues to charge for meals in Y on their overseas flights, AC still provides complimentary hot meals with choice of entrée and free booze in Y on Asia and Europe flights (not US, Mexico or Caribbean). 

The new business class studio pod is TERRIBLE - narrow, short and ridiculously sized and shaped. It's okay as a seat, but I paid for a good night's sleep. Forget it! I'm 6ft 4 and when the seat turns into a bed, it slides the lower half of your body into a tiny plastic coffin-like box (in the area under the armrests of the two passengers in front) with no room to move your legs at all, and it wasn't long enough for me - so it wasn't humanly possible to lie down!! Hell on earth. As a result, I arrived at LHR tired and irritable, lacking the sleep I had needed and deliberately paid for. The cabin crew was brilliant, but they told me that a lot of other business class passengers had complained about this new seat. It's also difficult to get the seat back up again from a supposed "bed". My seat 2A on C-FIVO was also missing a seat-based flexible reading light. It is a reasonably new aircraft so why on earth was that missing?
Air Canada’s configuration is identical to United’s 737-800s up until the exit row — United also has 16 first class seats, and then nine rows of extra legroom economy seating, including the two exit rows (that’s a lot of preferred seats). However, Air Canada manages to squeeze in an extra three seats in the back behind the exit row, though that seems to be accomplished by putting the bathrooms at the very back, rather than in front of the rear exits. In other words, the galley space will be smaller and cabin will be bigger.
We flew LHR-YVR on this aircraft and were fortunate to have a whole row of 4 seats between the two of us, allowing us to spread out. If the row had been full, my companion in 61F would have been very squashed as the seats are quite narrow. The in-flight service was much better than I expected it to be - full meal departing LHR, mid-flight snack and ice-cream, then hot snack before arrival in YVR.
Air Canada’s configuration is identical to United’s 737-800s up until the exit row — United also has 16 first class seats, and then nine rows of extra legroom economy seating, including the two exit rows (that’s a lot of preferred seats). However, Air Canada manages to squeeze in an extra three seats in the back behind the exit row, though that seems to be accomplished by putting the bathrooms at the very back, rather than in front of the rear exits. In other words, the galley space will be smaller and cabin will be bigger.
Airline seat pitch guides give you an indication of how much legroom you can expect. Economy class cabins on long haul flights generally offer 31 to 32 inches seat pitch (the industry standard), with a smaller number of airlines providing 33 to 35 inches of seat pitch. The higher the seat pitch, the fewer the number of seats an airline can fit into the cabin, so in present economic times do not expect to see airlines increasing seat pitch standards! It is important to remember that newer “slimline” seats do mean that a 32 inch seat pitch can offer as much personal legroom space as an older type of seat in a 34 inch seat pitch.

@Lucky: “While I imagine these planes will still be primarily used for shorter flights, the decision to fly them transatlantic is interesting.” AC uses these for everything and anything since they freely swap between their widebodies and narrowbodies on flights in North America. So, in other words, we’ll be riding this from Halifax to Vancouver (5.5 hours), Montreal to SFO (5 hours), etc. etc. Lots of looooong flights, so I don’t see why they similarly lengthy European flight is any different.
Airline seat pitch guides give you an indication of how much legroom you can expect. Economy class cabins on long haul flights generally offer 31 to 32 inches seat pitch (the industry standard), with a smaller number of airlines providing 33 to 35 inches of seat pitch. The higher the seat pitch, the fewer the number of seats an airline can fit into the cabin, so in present economic times do not expect to see airlines increasing seat pitch standards! It is important to remember that newer “slimline” seats do mean that a 32 inch seat pitch can offer as much personal legroom space as an older type of seat in a 34 inch seat pitch.
Our team were unanimous in selecting seats A or C, H or K in Rows 31-34 on this aircraft. On the plus side, you are at the quietest end of the cabin, will be amongst the first to deplane at destination, and stand a good choice of getting the full choice of meals on offer. Toilets are all to the rear, so no odours or queuing passengers nearby. On the downside, if the bassinet seats in Row 29/30 are full occupied by families with babies, there is a chance of occasional crying etc – so a good noise-cancelling headset would be a must.
On the way back from HKG, I paid up and got the Business Class (can't remember the seat#, it was window). While obviously it is a much improved seat versus Econ, the layout, and setup is horrendous for a business class charging thousands. The seat is so uncomfortable in any seating position you try to constantly adjust it, your knee hits the side of the seat, and if you get unlucky and get a window seat, you literally must climb over the passenger next to you to get out, are you kidding me? Further, due to more seats cramped the service is suffered compared to regular 777, 330, or 767.
Airline seat pitch guides give you an indication of how much legroom you can expect. Economy class cabins on long haul flights generally offer 31 to 32 inches seat pitch (the industry standard), with a smaller number of airlines providing 33 to 35 inches of seat pitch. The higher the seat pitch, the fewer the number of seats an airline can fit into the cabin, so in present economic times do not expect to see airlines increasing seat pitch standards! It is important to remember that newer “slimline” seats do mean that a 32 inch seat pitch can offer as much personal legroom space as an older type of seat in a 34 inch seat pitch.
By tradition, members of the governing party occupy the seats to the right of the speaker or chair, with the premier and other ministers in the front benches. Occasionally, due to space constraints, members of the governing party may also sit on the left. Members representing opposition parties are seated to the left, with the leader of the official opposition sitting opposite the premier.
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