You can clearly see this is an attempt to add more per-flight profit just by virtue of increasing the number of seats. Unfortunately, this means a few things for passengers: First Class features fewer seats meaning those seeking a Status upgrade are less likely to be successful. Premium Economy gets you the First Class food, but not the wine & liquor selection - and is only really worth the extra expense if you get seats A, C, H or K ... D, E, F, G are not really worth it in my opinion. The seats are more comfortable (mind you, I'm 5'6" so the overhead bin would be comfortable for me) than Economy, but the middle row still seemed crammed. Economy ... was ... just ... terrible. Even for a shorter guy like me, I was uncomfortable for the duration of the seven hour flight - my heart went out to the guy beside me who was easily over 6'.


Ensure you get the seat you want with Sunwing Airlines advanced seat selection. Whether you prefer a window seat or an aisle seat, or want to make sure you’re sitting with your family and friends, for just an extra $20 you can secure the seat you want. Pre-book and choose your seat ahead of time to avoid any unnecessary pre-departure stress; just sit back, relax and enjoy Sunwing’s award-winning inflight service. 

Expert Flyer offers free and pro subscriptions. Under free, travelers can use the website to find a better seat by entering their flight information and creating an alert when a more desirable seat becomes available. Under pro, there are basic and premium levels that offer services that include data for more than 400 airlines, detailed seat maps, and the ability to search for awards and upgrades. Users can also download free iOS and Android apps that offer the same service. 

I am Elite Air Canada member for over 10 years but flying economy in this plane makes me say NEVER again. I strongly advise against anyone choosing this airplane. The new 3-4-4 crammed configuration is horrendous. Too tight. But AC flights are still full.... that's why they cram in so many seats. Disgusted with the configuration. Food - AWFUL. Had a small meal right after take off in FRA and nothing again until 1h from YYZ - and it was a tiny little horrible pie inside a cardboard box. That's it!! Attendants were not exactly friendly. Avoid at all costs!!!
✅ Trip Verified | The flight was too cramped up with no space for cabin luggage. My cabin bag had to be kept in the business class as they had no space. I remember pressing the button for air hostess help at least 4 times and every time no body showed and the request button was reset. Overall a bad experience and I would not recommend travelling with Air Canada.
We flew LHR-YVR on this aircraft and were fortunate to have a whole row of 4 seats between the two of us, allowing us to spread out. If the row had been full, my companion in 61F would have been very squashed as the seats are quite narrow. The in-flight service was much better than I expected it to be - full meal departing LHR, mid-flight snack and ice-cream, then hot snack before arrival in YVR. 

Air Canada have revamped their pods in business class and the result is not good. They are narrower than before and taper very abruptly at the end, which means your feet are crammed together uncomfortably. I got very little sleep and had little luck distracting myself with the inflight entertainment,which now appears to be little more than an afterthought. The music choices were miserably poor: just four or five pieces in each category. On the plus side, the food was much better than a year ago.
It's a very small and cramped little nook on the air plane. I spent the extra $ to book a emergency exit row, and this time I regretted. There's no windows but tons of leg room. Also, there's absolutely no space to stow away your personal item bag. I was also on the plane with another man who was tall and large build which also made it uncomfortable for both of us. There are tons of people constantly coming in and out and wiating in front of you to use the washroom, so it also disruptive. Wouldn't recommend this seat if you are trying to catch some sleep.
Flying these days is often a huge hassle: You have to get to the airport early to make sure you get through security in time, and then there's the issue of the flight itself. One of the biggest issues related to your comfort and a pleasant trip is where you sit: how much legroom the seat has, how wide it is, and how much overhead bin space there is above you for your carry-on luggage. Other considerations include trying to avoid the middle seat in a group of three, getting your preference for a window or an aisle seat, and sitting close to the front of the section so you can deplane more quickly. If you pick a good seat, it makes the whole journey a lot better.
This is an aisle seat which I requested. More comfortable than I expected for a four hour plus flight. Enough leg room for myself but probably not for somebody taller than 5ft. 10ish. Howowever most seats are scrunched now anyhow. Only complaint was it seemed to take more time to get the food service from the location of this seat. Seemed they were going in the opposite direction of my seat.
Flying these days is often a huge hassle: You have to get to the airport early to make sure you get through security in time, and then there's the issue of the flight itself. One of the biggest issues related to your comfort and a pleasant trip is where you sit: how much legroom the seat has, how wide it is, and how much overhead bin space there is above you for your carry-on luggage. Other considerations include trying to avoid the middle seat in a group of three, getting your preference for a window or an aisle seat, and sitting close to the front of the section so you can deplane more quickly. If you pick a good seat, it makes the whole journey a lot better.
Just flew on Air Canada’s 737 max 8 for the first time between Montreal and Vancouver in economy. I have flown Air Canada’s older A320, 777, 787 and CRJ900 and by comparison found myself for the first time having problems with leg room. I am 5’10 and my knees were already touching the seat in front. It seems like economy is really configured with seating of 30″ pitch, an economy seat spacing less that that of other Air Canada aircraft. I was traveling in the same row as a passenger seated by the aisle and at around 6′ height, he had to angle his legs other into the aisle or into the space of the middle seat passenger. Not the best situation. Considering the flight was about 5 hours in duration and that the same aircraft is used for transatlantic flights I find it hard to understand why Air Canada configured their aircraft in such a manner. Seat comfort isn’t the only issue. For passengers in economy it is necessary to access the aft cabin which is normally a zone separated for crew to work in the galley. Instead in this aircraft that space is now subdivided such that the right hand side of the aft cabin is devoted to the galley and the left hand side has access to two lavatories adjoined side by side. In line with the minimalist seating, the lavatories are also space savers featuring inward opening bi-fold doors. It has the same feeling as walking into a closet. To sum up the economy class experience flying the Air Canada 737 max 8 has less personal space and comfort compared to a regional jet that operates on flight durations that demand wide-body aircraft comfort.
I will be flying on this plane from Montreal to London in July. There will be three of us in row 28 ABC - my son will have the window, I will be in the middle and my husband will have the aisle. There are two sections after premium economy, ours is the first one. I see on the SeatGuru website that the seats behind us have alerts - they back onto the exit door area and have limited recline ability. Hence, will this mean I will have limited recline ability unless I want to be a jerk and lean back into someone's face while I sleep through a night flight?
Most airlines now charge an additional fee to sit in the exit rows, others will allocate at check-in (remarkably some airlines still favour these seats for much taller passengers!). You do get a lot more legroom in an exit seat, but on the downside there are a few points to remember. You will not be allowed to keep any items of hand-luggage (even books etc sometimes) by your seat/footwell area during landing and take-off periods, and as the bins above your seat may be full by the time you realise, you will have to hope for a cooperative cabin crew that will take these items off you at these periods and return them after take-off and landing!
Air Canada’s configuration is identical to United’s 737-800s up until the exit row — United also has 16 first class seats, and then nine rows of extra legroom economy seating, including the two exit rows (that’s a lot of preferred seats). However, Air Canada manages to squeeze in an extra three seats in the back behind the exit row, though that seems to be accomplished by putting the bathrooms at the very back, rather than in front of the rear exits. In other words, the galley space will be smaller and cabin will be bigger. 

Some trains have seats in open-plan saloons, indeed most modern trains have this sort of seating.  Some trains, often older ones and often in eastern Europe, have seats in traditional 6-seater compartments with a side corridor running the length of the car.  There are sliding (but non-lockable) doors to each compartment.  Very occasionally you'll find both sorts of seating on one train, and some booking systems (such as the German Railways site bahn.de or Austrian site oebb.at) will ask you which you prefer.  Unless you're in a group of 5 or 6 people, most travellers prefer open-plan saloon seating, which also gives you a better view out as you can view diagonally forwards and backwards through all the coach windows, not just directly sideways through your own window.
Air Canada have revamped their pods in business class and the result is not good. They are narrower than before and taper very abruptly at the end, which means your feet are crammed together uncomfortably. I got very little sleep and had little luck distracting myself with the inflight entertainment,which now appears to be little more than an afterthought. The music choices were miserably poor: just four or five pieces in each category. On the plus side, the food was much better than a year ago.
We were due to sit in 5H&K but on boarding were switched to 1H&K. I had read many poor reviews about this version of the 777. To be honest, it wasn't nearly as bad as led to believe. I'm 5'10" and 180lb so can't speak for others. Seats were firm but comfortable and it was easy to adjust them to find a comfortable position. The cubby hole for feet was decent enough. IFE was quick and responsive. Tray tables quirky and took a bit of working out . Meals and service were very good. Friendly flight attendants. I understand that this seating will be replaced with that used on Air Canada's 787's.
This is the row just before the lavatories. Seats do not recline, however the seats in row in front (22) do, which makes the right space even tighter, the screen is right in your face if the person in front of you decides to have the seat back for the whole flight, in my case for 8 hours. Not possible to watch anything in this position. Very hard in your back. I also had the…
Most airlines now charge an additional fee to sit in the exit rows, others will allocate at check-in (remarkably some airlines still favour these seats for much taller passengers!). You do get a lot more legroom in an exit seat, but on the downside there are a few points to remember. You will not be allowed to keep any items of hand-luggage (even books etc sometimes) by your seat/footwell area during landing and take-off periods, and as the bins above your seat may be full by the time you realise, you will have to hope for a cooperative cabin crew that will take these items off you at these periods and return them after take-off and landing!

If you are over 6" and weigh more than 200lbs, you will not fit in economy. Entire layout is designed for 5"11 & under 180lbs. Which is curious because the head room is ~10-11ft - crazy. You can stand comfortably if your 6'8, but can't sit. Another oddity; the overhead bin does not accommondate carry on's that are 1CM over lentgh minimums. Mine is .5CM (measured) over published Air Canada minimums and would not fit in overhead bin, even though on all Airbus, Embraer, Bombardier models the carry on fits fine. Ridiculous. Not sure on other rows, but the touch button control of lights etc. is on the inside of the armrest so rest assured your leg will often trigger lights on/off inadvertantly. Saw others with controls on the armrest itself (top) and heard complaints. If comfort/practicality are important, avoid this model.


Bulkhead seats are are located immediately behind a solid cabin divider (on the PLAN below, Row 30, seats D/E/F/G/H/K). This is normally the location where a Bassinet is provided for families with babies, so can be noisier. Whilst you have no seat reclining in front of you, the legroom may at first seem spacious, but you will find that stretching your legs is not possible like in an ordinary seat. Bulkhead seats also suffer the fact that your tray table will be in the seat armrest, and this be cumbersome when left with a finished meal tray for long periods of time.
By tradition, members of the governing party occupy the seats to the right of the speaker or chair, with the premier and other ministers in the front benches. Occasionally, due to space constraints, members of the governing party may also sit on the left. Members representing opposition parties are seated to the left, with the leader of the official opposition sitting opposite the premier.
It's a very small and cramped little nook on the air plane. I spent the extra $ to book a emergency exit row, and this time I regretted. There's no windows but tons of leg room. Also, there's absolutely no space to stow away your personal item bag. I was also on the plane with another man who was tall and large build which also made it uncomfortable for both of us. There are tons of people constantly coming in and out and wiating in front of you to use the washroom, so it also disruptive. Wouldn't recommend this seat if you are trying to catch some sleep.

Seat is somewhat comfortable and still felt I had enough space when the person in front reclined. However, I would most definitely not like to experience this HD layout (3x4x3) long-haul. I saw passengers of a much bigger build than me, and they were squished like sardines; very little/no room to manoeuvre EXCEPT if you have an aisle seat; one side open for a little extra elbow room/leg room.
We were due to sit in 5H&K but on boarding were switched to 1H&K. I had read many poor reviews about this version of the 777. To be honest, it wasn't nearly as bad as led to believe. I'm 5'10" and 180lb so can't speak for others. Seats were firm but comfortable and it was easy to adjust them to find a comfortable position. The cubby hole for feet was decent enough. IFE was quick and responsive. Tray tables quirky and took a bit of working out . Meals and service were very good. Friendly flight attendants. I understand that this seating will be replaced with that used on Air Canada's 787's.
×