Some trains have seats in open-plan saloons, indeed most modern trains have this sort of seating.  Some trains, often older ones and often in eastern Europe, have seats in traditional 6-seater compartments with a side corridor running the length of the car.  There are sliding (but non-lockable) doors to each compartment.  Very occasionally you'll find both sorts of seating on one train, and some booking systems (such as the German Railways site bahn.de or Austrian site oebb.at) will ask you which you prefer.  Unless you're in a group of 5 or 6 people, most travellers prefer open-plan saloon seating, which also gives you a better view out as you can view diagonally forwards and backwards through all the coach windows, not just directly sideways through your own window.


Expert Flyer offers free and pro subscriptions. Under free, travelers can use the website to find a better seat by entering their flight information and creating an alert when a more desirable seat becomes available. Under pro, there are basic and premium levels that offer services that include data for more than 400 airlines, detailed seat maps, and the ability to search for awards and upgrades. Users can also download free iOS and Android apps that offer the same service.
The new business class studio pod is TERRIBLE - narrow, short and ridiculously sized and shaped. It's okay as a seat, but I paid for a good night's sleep. Forget it! I'm 6ft 4 and when the seat turns into a bed, it slides the lower half of your body into a tiny plastic coffin-like box (in the area under the armrests of the two passengers in front) with no room to move your legs at all, and it wasn't long enough for me - so it wasn't humanly possible to lie down!! Hell on earth. As a result, I arrived at LHR tired and irritable, lacking the sleep I had needed and deliberately paid for. The cabin crew was brilliant, but they told me that a lot of other business class passengers had complained about this new seat. It's also difficult to get the seat back up again from a supposed "bed". My seat 2A on C-FIVO was also missing a seat-based flexible reading light. It is a reasonably new aircraft so why on earth was that missing?

This was supposed to be an A330-300, however, the configuration was different than the seat choice map. This seems to be pretty common for Air Canada. The last time I flew this route it was in premium economy, however the premium economy had 4 seats in the middle and the "extra" legroom was not any better or worth the money over regular coach, so thought I would try bulkhead, row 18. I am not sure it was worth the seat cost. The person next to me asked to be moved even though he paid extra for the seat because he had a broken foot and it was more uncomfortable than regular economy where you can put your feet under the seat in front of you. This row perhaps had a bit more space from the back of the seat to the bulkhead, however the extra space for knees does not help your feet, and all bags need to go overhead. Having the seat next to me empty meant I could fold my legs over the tray table armrest that was not movable and stretch out a bit to sleep.
✅ Trip Verified | We travelled Air Canada from Montreal to LAX yesterday in Business Class. The plane is a new Boeing 737. It seems like Air Canada is following the Rouge tradition by having the most uncomfortable seats imaginable even on a brand new plane. The thickness of the back cushion is very thin and there is a horizontal rod that is placed it seems to cause maximum discomfort. This flight is 6 hours! The foot rests are also extraordinarily cheap and won’t go down unless you get on your knees and manipulate it manually. Also, just like horrible Rouge, the seat posts are positioned so that you cannot store any hand luggage in front of your seat . The middle section has to be shared by seat neighbors. Air Canada used to be our favorite airline and now we have advised our travel agent to research any alternative to Air Canada and Rouge.
This is a matter of personal choice, but on widebody aircraft you will generally find that the front of the Economy cabin is the quietest, normally just in front of the aircraft engines. The rear of the cabin tends to be noisiest from an engine noise perspective, and this also tends to bump around more during turbulence – of course, on less than full flights, you normally find that there are more empty seats at the back of the plane where you can spread out. For the meal services, it is difficult to suggest where you are more likely to be offered the full choice of meals before they run out! Some airlines start meal services from the front of the cabin, some the middle, and a few from the back of the cabin!
The airline may change the aircraft type before you travel, so the seat numbers you have selected might either change, or not be in the position that you had expected. There are also many instances where the airline’s “system” may decide to re-allocate your chosen seat to another passenger – and you will be left trying to resolve this at airport check in (possibly with no success!)
Just flew on Air Canada’s 737 max 8 for the first time between Montreal and Vancouver in economy. I have flown Air Canada’s older A320, 777, 787 and CRJ900 and by comparison found myself for the first time having problems with leg room. I am 5’10 and my knees were already touching the seat in front. It seems like economy is really configured with seating of 30″ pitch, an economy seat spacing less that that of other Air Canada aircraft. I was traveling in the same row as a passenger seated by the aisle and at around 6′ height, he had to angle his legs other into the aisle or into the space of the middle seat passenger. Not the best situation. Considering the flight was about 5 hours in duration and that the same aircraft is used for transatlantic flights I find it hard to understand why Air Canada configured their aircraft in such a manner. Seat comfort isn’t the only issue. For passengers in economy it is necessary to access the aft cabin which is normally a zone separated for crew to work in the galley. Instead in this aircraft that space is now subdivided such that the right hand side of the aft cabin is devoted to the galley and the left hand side has access to two lavatories adjoined side by side. In line with the minimalist seating, the lavatories are also space savers featuring inward opening bi-fold doors. It has the same feeling as walking into a closet. To sum up the economy class experience flying the Air Canada 737 max 8 has less personal space and comfort compared to a regional jet that operates on flight durations that demand wide-body aircraft comfort.
I am 6'5" tall, and these biz class seats are too short for lie-flat seating. Besides being too short, they taper uncomfortably at the feet, which reminds me of squeezing into a test tube or a mummy sleeping bag. For mostly-reclined seating the seat is OK, although the bottom cushion is too thin and I could feel the hard support beneath it. Lack of lumbar support, while true, didn't bother me too much. On the plus side, the light in the foot well is thoughtful, and I found the other lighting more than adequate. A dimmer control for the bright reading light would be good. The storage space for small stuff was very good.

Another important point with the extended space around the exit rows, is that on some flights you might find that passengers from elsewhere in the cabin decide that this is a good place to congregate and chat, do their stretching exercises etc, and it can therefore prove a rather busy place. It is also always worth watching out for those middle seat rows in the aircraft that look like there is a lot of legroom – this might be the case, but you can find that your hoped for space in front is being used as a cabin cross-over passage, as passengers go to the washrooms etc.
For a newly designed plane I was surprised that the seats very narrow and legroom limited compared to older planes. I am 6'3" and 210lbs and I was unable to stretch both feet out at the same time. I took the advice of a previous reviewer at changed my seat to 60A as there were 2 seats rather than 3 in the outside row. I had more shoulder room as I could lean to one side can't imagine 5 hours in a row with 10 seats across.
✅ Trip Verified | The flight was too cramped up with no space for cabin luggage. My cabin bag had to be kept in the business class as they had no space. I remember pressing the button for air hostess help at least 4 times and every time no body showed and the request button was reset. Overall a bad experience and I would not recommend travelling with Air Canada.
✅ Trip Verified | We travelled Air Canada from Montreal to LAX yesterday in Business Class. The plane is a new Boeing 737. It seems like Air Canada is following the Rouge tradition by having the most uncomfortable seats imaginable even on a brand new plane. The thickness of the back cushion is very thin and there is a horizontal rod that is placed it seems to cause maximum discomfort. This flight is 6 hours! The foot rests are also extraordinarily cheap and won’t go down unless you get on your knees and manipulate it manually. Also, just like horrible Rouge, the seat posts are positioned so that you cannot store any hand luggage in front of your seat . The middle section has to be shared by seat neighbors. Air Canada used to be our favorite airline and now we have advised our travel agent to research any alternative to Air Canada and Rouge.
I will be flying on this plane from Montreal to London in July. There will be three of us in row 28 ABC - my son will have the window, I will be in the middle and my husband will have the aisle. There are two sections after premium economy, ours is the first one. I see on the SeatGuru website that the seats behind us have alerts - they back onto the exit door area and have limited recline ability. Hence, will this mean I will have limited recline ability unless I want to be a jerk and lean back into someone's face while I sleep through a night flight?
Some trains have seats in open-plan saloons, indeed most modern trains have this sort of seating.  Some trains, often older ones and often in eastern Europe, have seats in traditional 6-seater compartments with a side corridor running the length of the car.  There are sliding (but non-lockable) doors to each compartment.  Very occasionally you'll find both sorts of seating on one train, and some booking systems (such as the German Railways site bahn.de or Austrian site oebb.at) will ask you which you prefer.  Unless you're in a group of 5 or 6 people, most travellers prefer open-plan saloon seating, which also gives you a better view out as you can view diagonally forwards and backwards through all the coach windows, not just directly sideways through your own window.
For a newly designed plane I was surprised that the seats very narrow and legroom limited compared to older planes. I am 6'3" and 210lbs and I was unable to stretch both feet out at the same time. I took the advice of a previous reviewer at changed my seat to 60A as there were 2 seats rather than 3 in the outside row. I had more shoulder room as I could lean to one side can't imagine 5 hours in a row with 10 seats across.
Some trains have seats in open-plan saloons, indeed most modern trains have this sort of seating.  Some trains, often older ones and often in eastern Europe, have seats in traditional 6-seater compartments with a side corridor running the length of the car.  There are sliding (but non-lockable) doors to each compartment.  Very occasionally you'll find both sorts of seating on one train, and some booking systems (such as the German Railways site bahn.de or Austrian site oebb.at) will ask you which you prefer.  Unless you're in a group of 5 or 6 people, most travellers prefer open-plan saloon seating, which also gives you a better view out as you can view diagonally forwards and backwards through all the coach windows, not just directly sideways through your own window.
Avoid e and f seats if possible. the seat supports are misaligned so you have to try and put one fut on each side of the support. The aisle row people claim this as their area forcing you to try to stretch one leg at a time. My wife couldn't even get her purse under the seat. There are also some posts for power which makes this even worse. Quick summary avoid the economy e and f seats.
We spend a lot of time getting our seating charts/seat maps right because we know how important they are when deciding which event to attend. When possible, we’ll provide you with photos of actual seat views from different locations in a venue. You can go to our Air Canada Centre seat views page to see them. Air Canada Centre can hold up to 19,800 people but that's a lot of seats and therefore a lot of potential seat views. We wish we had all 19,800 individual seat views for Air Canada Centre but we don't, therefore the seat views we show are usually a sample from different sections in a venue.
Upon payment of the seat selection fee, Air Transat will assign you your requested seat. No refund will be provided should a passenger cancel their seat selection prior to travel. In the event of an aircraft substitution, Air Transat will assign an equivalent seat. If a passenger does not receive an equivalent seat, they will be entitled to a refund of their seat selection fee. To receive a refund, the passenger must submit a copy of their boarding pass, along with their contact information, within 30 days of their return flight. Any request for a refund made after this deadline or without all the required information will not be processed. Air Transat’s liability is limited to refunding the fees associated with seat selection.
Some trains have seats in open-plan saloons, indeed most modern trains have this sort of seating.  Some trains, often older ones and often in eastern Europe, have seats in traditional 6-seater compartments with a side corridor running the length of the car.  There are sliding (but non-lockable) doors to each compartment.  Very occasionally you'll find both sorts of seating on one train, and some booking systems (such as the German Railways site bahn.de or Austrian site oebb.at) will ask you which you prefer.  Unless you're in a group of 5 or 6 people, most travellers prefer open-plan saloon seating, which also gives you a better view out as you can view diagonally forwards and backwards through all the coach windows, not just directly sideways through your own window.
Also, the exit row seats will not have a PTV entertainment screen on the back of the seat in front (as most seats), but will have the video screen stored in the armrest – similar for the meal tray table which will be stored in your armrest. Because of this design layout, you might find that the actual seat width is less than ordinary seats, and it can be quite cumbersome using the PTV and tray tables – guess it is a case of measuring that against the benefit of extended leg space you will get.
The airline may change the aircraft type before you travel, so the seat numbers you have selected might either change, or not be in the position that you had expected. There are also many instances where the airline’s “system” may decide to re-allocate your chosen seat to another passenger – and you will be left trying to resolve this at airport check in (possibly with no success!)
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