Most airlines now charge an additional fee to sit in the exit rows, others will allocate at check-in (remarkably some airlines still favour these seats for much taller passengers!). You do get a lot more legroom in an exit seat, but on the downside there are a few points to remember. You will not be allowed to keep any items of hand-luggage (even books etc sometimes) by your seat/footwell area during landing and take-off periods, and as the bins above your seat may be full by the time you realise, you will have to hope for a cooperative cabin crew that will take these items off you at these periods and return them after take-off and landing!
Some trains have seats in open-plan saloons, indeed most modern trains have this sort of seating.  Some trains, often older ones and often in eastern Europe, have seats in traditional 6-seater compartments with a side corridor running the length of the car.  There are sliding (but non-lockable) doors to each compartment.  Very occasionally you'll find both sorts of seating on one train, and some booking systems (such as the German Railways site bahn.de or Austrian site oebb.at) will ask you which you prefer.  Unless you're in a group of 5 or 6 people, most travellers prefer open-plan saloon seating, which also gives you a better view out as you can view diagonally forwards and backwards through all the coach windows, not just directly sideways through your own window.

We flew LHR-YVR on this aircraft and were fortunate to have a whole row of 4 seats between the two of us, allowing us to spread out. If the row had been full, my companion in 61F would have been very squashed as the seats are quite narrow. The in-flight service was much better than I expected it to be - full meal departing LHR, mid-flight snack and ice-cream, then hot snack before arrival in YVR.
@Lucky: “While I imagine these planes will still be primarily used for shorter flights, the decision to fly them transatlantic is interesting.” AC uses these for everything and anything since they freely swap between their widebodies and narrowbodies on flights in North America. So, in other words, we’ll be riding this from Halifax to Vancouver (5.5 hours), Montreal to SFO (5 hours), etc. etc. Lots of looooong flights, so I don’t see why they similarly lengthy European flight is any different.

Hi all, took AC flight from Montreal to Dublin Ireland on the 737 max 8, had the two first row seats on right hand side of plane going to Dublin, for me at 6 feet legs had little room in the aisle seat, however on the return flight we were on the left hand side of plane and I felt that my aisle seat had a bit more legroom! Have photos but cannot figure how to get them onto this site, the seats for comfort are OK, but I would not “rave” about them though they are more comfy than those sitting in economy. AC for 2019 seems to be using the Airbus 330-300 for Montreal to Dublin flights, not sure how comfy the premium economy will be on that plane depending on their configuration for those flights. Any comments from anyone ?
As for Vij’s comparison to WestJet: their Plus seating is more pitch, a blocked middle seat with a free sandwich and snack (and unlimited complimentary booze). AC’s long haul J service includes 4 hot meal choices in china dishes, and two premium red, 2 premium whites as well as expanded beverages (Cranberry juice and Perrier). WestJet continues to charge for meals in Y on their overseas flights, AC still provides complimentary hot meals with choice of entrée and free booze in Y on Asia and Europe flights (not US, Mexico or Caribbean).

✅ Trip Verified | We travelled Air Canada from Montreal to LAX yesterday in Business Class. The plane is a new Boeing 737. It seems like Air Canada is following the Rouge tradition by having the most uncomfortable seats imaginable even on a brand new plane. The thickness of the back cushion is very thin and there is a horizontal rod that is placed it seems to cause maximum discomfort. This flight is 6 hours! The foot rests are also extraordinarily cheap and won’t go down unless you get on your knees and manipulate it manually. Also, just like horrible Rouge, the seat posts are positioned so that you cannot store any hand luggage in front of your seat . The middle section has to be shared by seat neighbors. Air Canada used to be our favorite airline and now we have advised our travel agent to research any alternative to Air Canada and Rouge.


Expert Flyer offers free and pro subscriptions. Under free, travelers can use the website to find a better seat by entering their flight information and creating an alert when a more desirable seat becomes available. Under pro, there are basic and premium levels that offer services that include data for more than 400 airlines, detailed seat maps, and the ability to search for awards and upgrades. Users can also download free iOS and Android apps that offer the same service.
We use cookies and similar technologies on our website to improve the content and functioning of our website and to show you relevant advertising. Our website might also contain third party cookies from our partners. You can learn more about how we use these technologies in our Cookies Policy and Privacy Policy. We want our website to be informative, personal, and as user friendly as possible and cookies and similar technologies help us achieve that goal.
As for Vij’s comparison to WestJet: their Plus seating is more pitch, a blocked middle seat with a free sandwich and snack (and unlimited complimentary booze). AC’s long haul J service includes 4 hot meal choices in china dishes, and two premium red, 2 premium whites as well as expanded beverages (Cranberry juice and Perrier). WestJet continues to charge for meals in Y on their overseas flights, AC still provides complimentary hot meals with choice of entrée and free booze in Y on Asia and Europe flights (not US, Mexico or Caribbean).
×