I am Elite Air Canada member for over 10 years but flying economy in this plane makes me say NEVER again. I strongly advise against anyone choosing this airplane. The new 3-4-4 crammed configuration is horrendous. Too tight. But AC flights are still full.... that's why they cram in so many seats. Disgusted with the configuration. Food - AWFUL. Had a small meal right after take off in FRA and nothing again until 1h from YYZ - and it was a tiny little horrible pie inside a cardboard box. That's it!! Attendants were not exactly friendly. Avoid at all costs!!!
On many long haul aircraft, some passengers will find that their footspace (ie the area under the seat in front) is impacted by the location of the control box for the IFE (inflight entertainment). This is something that is gradually being changed and improved by seat suppliers, but don’t expect quick results. Across many airlines, this IFE control box might be located in the aisle seat footwell area, although for some it is the window or middle seat that suffers – so, no hard and fast rules here.
Air Canada have revamped their pods in business class and the result is not good. They are narrower than before and taper very abruptly at the end, which means your feet are crammed together uncomfortably. I got very little sleep and had little luck distracting myself with the inflight entertainment,which now appears to be little more than an afterthought. The music choices were miserably poor: just four or five pieces in each category. On the plus side, the food was much better than a year ago.

Some trains have seats in open-plan saloons, indeed most modern trains have this sort of seating.  Some trains, often older ones and often in eastern Europe, have seats in traditional 6-seater compartments with a side corridor running the length of the car.  There are sliding (but non-lockable) doors to each compartment.  Very occasionally you'll find both sorts of seating on one train, and some booking systems (such as the German Railways site bahn.de or Austrian site oebb.at) will ask you which you prefer.  Unless you're in a group of 5 or 6 people, most travellers prefer open-plan saloon seating, which also gives you a better view out as you can view diagonally forwards and backwards through all the coach windows, not just directly sideways through your own window.
Bulkhead seats are are located immediately behind a solid cabin divider (on the PLAN below, Row 30, seats D/E/F/G/H/K). This is normally the location where a Bassinet is provided for families with babies, so can be noisier. Whilst you have no seat reclining in front of you, the legroom may at first seem spacious, but you will find that stretching your legs is not possible like in an ordinary seat. Bulkhead seats also suffer the fact that your tray table will be in the seat armrest, and this be cumbersome when left with a finished meal tray for long periods of time.
On the way back from HKG, I paid up and got the Business Class (can't remember the seat#, it was window). While obviously it is a much improved seat versus Econ, the layout, and setup is horrendous for a business class charging thousands. The seat is so uncomfortable in any seating position you try to constantly adjust it, your knee hits the side of the seat, and if you get unlucky and get a window seat, you literally must climb over the passenger next to you to get out, are you kidding me? Further, due to more seats cramped the service is suffered compared to regular 777, 330, or 767.
Ensure you get the seat you want with Sunwing Airlines advanced seat selection. Whether you prefer a window seat or an aisle seat, or want to make sure you’re sitting with your family and friends, for just an extra $20 you can secure the seat you want. Pre-book and choose your seat ahead of time to avoid any unnecessary pre-departure stress; just sit back, relax and enjoy Sunwing’s award-winning inflight service. 

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Airline seat pitch guides give you an indication of how much legroom you can expect. Economy class cabins on long haul flights generally offer 31 to 32 inches seat pitch (the industry standard), with a smaller number of airlines providing 33 to 35 inches of seat pitch. The higher the seat pitch, the fewer the number of seats an airline can fit into the cabin, so in present economic times do not expect to see airlines increasing seat pitch standards! It is important to remember that newer “slimline” seats do mean that a 32 inch seat pitch can offer as much personal legroom space as an older type of seat in a 34 inch seat pitch.
A couple of weeks ago I booked Business Class on Air Canada from Western Canada to Shannon via Toronto for summer 2018. A few days ago I received an itinerary update, stating that my transatlantic flight was now Premium Economy. I called Air Canada Reservations and said that if they were withdrawing Business Class, I was withdrawing my fare. The agent said that there had been a change of aircraft and there was no Business Class on the new aircraft (737 Max). So I cancelled my flights without penalty and the agent rebooked me on the same flights, same seats, Premium Economy, for half the original fare. This proves that they are just trying to get away with calling it Business Class if they can. Don’t be fooled! 

If you are over 6" and weigh more than 200lbs, you will not fit in economy. Entire layout is designed for 5"11 & under 180lbs. Which is curious because the head room is ~10-11ft - crazy. You can stand comfortably if your 6'8, but can't sit. Another oddity; the overhead bin does not accommondate carry on's that are 1CM over lentgh minimums. Mine is .5CM (measured) over published Air Canada minimums and would not fit in overhead bin, even though on all Airbus, Embraer, Bombardier models the carry on fits fine. Ridiculous. Not sure on other rows, but the touch button control of lights etc. is on the inside of the armrest so rest assured your leg will often trigger lights on/off inadvertantly. Saw others with controls on the armrest itself (top) and heard complaints. If comfort/practicality are important, avoid this model.

On many long haul aircraft, some passengers will find that their footspace (ie the area under the seat in front) is impacted by the location of the control box for the IFE (inflight entertainment). This is something that is gradually being changed and improved by seat suppliers, but don’t expect quick results. Across many airlines, this IFE control box might be located in the aisle seat footwell area, although for some it is the window or middle seat that suffers – so, no hard and fast rules here.


there is no space to keep anything that you may want handy on a flight, like your personal bag with your documents. the seat is tight, felt like I was in a casket in a straight position. small seat, narrow, short, poor support. the crew used the "space" as their holding area for cabin trolleys n people would stand around u waiting for the lavatory. no fun. i'm over 6' tall.

We spend a lot of time getting our seating charts/seat maps right because we know how important they are when deciding which event to attend. When possible, we’ll provide you with photos of actual seat views from different locations in a venue. You can go to our Air Canada Centre seat views page to see them. Air Canada Centre can hold up to 19,800 people but that's a lot of seats and therefore a lot of potential seat views. We wish we had all 19,800 individual seat views for Air Canada Centre but we don't, therefore the seat views we show are usually a sample from different sections in a venue.
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On many long haul aircraft, some passengers will find that their footspace (ie the area under the seat in front) is impacted by the location of the control box for the IFE (inflight entertainment). This is something that is gradually being changed and improved by seat suppliers, but don’t expect quick results. Across many airlines, this IFE control box might be located in the aisle seat footwell area, although for some it is the window or middle seat that suffers – so, no hard and fast rules here.
✅ Trip Verified | The flight was too cramped up with no space for cabin luggage. My cabin bag had to be kept in the business class as they had no space. I remember pressing the button for air hostess help at least 4 times and every time no body showed and the request button was reset. Overall a bad experience and I would not recommend travelling with Air Canada. 

✅ Trip Verified | The flight was too cramped up with no space for cabin luggage. My cabin bag had to be kept in the business class as they had no space. I remember pressing the button for air hostess help at least 4 times and every time no body showed and the request button was reset. Overall a bad experience and I would not recommend travelling with Air Canada.

As for Vij’s comparison to WestJet: their Plus seating is more pitch, a blocked middle seat with a free sandwich and snack (and unlimited complimentary booze). AC’s long haul J service includes 4 hot meal choices in china dishes, and two premium red, 2 premium whites as well as expanded beverages (Cranberry juice and Perrier). WestJet continues to charge for meals in Y on their overseas flights, AC still provides complimentary hot meals with choice of entrée and free booze in Y on Asia and Europe flights (not US, Mexico or Caribbean).

We spend a lot of time getting our seating charts/seat maps right because we know how important they are when deciding which event to attend. When possible, we’ll provide you with photos of actual seat views from different locations in a venue. You can go to our Air Canada Centre seat views page to see them. Air Canada Centre can hold up to 19,800 people but that's a lot of seats and therefore a lot of potential seat views. We wish we had all 19,800 individual seat views for Air Canada Centre but we don't, therefore the seat views we show are usually a sample from different sections in a venue.
Bulkhead seats are are located immediately behind a solid cabin divider (on the PLAN below, Row 30, seats D/E/F/G/H/K). This is normally the location where a Bassinet is provided for families with babies, so can be noisier. Whilst you have no seat reclining in front of you, the legroom may at first seem spacious, but you will find that stretching your legs is not possible like in an ordinary seat. Bulkhead seats also suffer the fact that your tray table will be in the seat armrest, and this be cumbersome when left with a finished meal tray for long periods of time.
Seating plans have a wide range of purposes. At formal dinners, they are usually used to avoid chaos and confusion upon entrance and to follow the etiquette. In this case, it is customary to arrange the host and hostess at the opposite sides of the table, and alternate male and female guests throughout.[1] Place cards can be used to direct guests. State dinners have their own protocol and arrangements are made so that the most distinguished guests can have the possibility to engage in conversation. Plans are also made for airplanes, where the objective is to differentiate passengers between the various travel classes and ensure everybody has a place. Similarly, theatres or cinemas may allow spectators to choose their seats beforehand. A seating plan is of crucial importance for musical ensembles or orchestras, where every type of instrument is allocated a specific section.[2]
If you want to get on the flight, and sleep with as little disturbance as possible, then a window seat may be the best option – you also get the outer cabin wall to lean against, rather than falling asleep on your fellow travellers. Remember however that the cabin walls on some aircraft have more curvature than others, and the window seat can feel as if it has less shoulder-room that ordinary seats.
The airline may change the aircraft type before you travel, so the seat numbers you have selected might either change, or not be in the position that you had expected. There are also many instances where the airline’s “system” may decide to re-allocate your chosen seat to another passenger – and you will be left trying to resolve this at airport check in (possibly with no success!)
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