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This was supposed to be an A330-300, however, the configuration was different than the seat choice map. This seems to be pretty common for Air Canada. The last time I flew this route it was in premium economy, however the premium economy had 4 seats in the middle and the "extra" legroom was not any better or worth the money over regular coach, so thought I would try bulkhead, row 18. I am not sure it was worth the seat cost. The person next to me asked to be moved even though he paid extra for the seat because he had a broken foot and it was more uncomfortable than regular economy where you can put your feet under the seat in front of you. This row perhaps had a bit more space from the back of the seat to the bulkhead, however the extra space for knees does not help your feet, and all bags need to go overhead. Having the seat next to me empty meant I could fold my legs over the tray table armrest that was not movable and stretch out a bit to sleep.
Expert Flyer offers free and pro subscriptions. Under free, travelers can use the website to find a better seat by entering their flight information and creating an alert when a more desirable seat becomes available. Under pro, there are basic and premium levels that offer services that include data for more than 400 airlines, detailed seat maps, and the ability to search for awards and upgrades. Users can also download free iOS and Android apps that offer the same service.
Founded in 1937, Air Canada (AC) is Canada's largest airline as well as its flag carrier. It operates from hubs at Calgary International Airport (YYC), Montréal–Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport (YUL), Toronto Pearson International Airport (YYZ) and Vancouver International Airport (YVR). A member of the Star Alliance, Air Canada and its subsidiaries fly to more than 185 destinations in North America, Central America, South America, the Caribbean, Europe, the Middle East, Asia and Australia. It also has codeshare agreements with about 30 other carriers. Its fleet of 175 aircraft consists of one-cabin (Economy Class), two-cabin (Economy Class and either Business Class or Premium Economy Class) and three-cabin (Business Class, Premium Economy Class and Economy Class) configurations.
On many long haul aircraft, some passengers will find that their footspace (ie the area under the seat in front) is impacted by the location of the control box for the IFE (inflight entertainment). This is something that is gradually being changed and improved by seat suppliers, but don’t expect quick results. Across many airlines, this IFE control box might be located in the aisle seat footwell area, although for some it is the window or middle seat that suffers – so, no hard and fast rules here.

there is no space to keep anything that you may want handy on a flight, like your personal bag with your documents. the seat is tight, felt like I was in a casket in a straight position. small seat, narrow, short, poor support. the crew used the "space" as their holding area for cabin trolleys n people would stand around u waiting for the lavatory. no fun. i'm over 6' tall.
By tradition, members of the governing party occupy the seats to the right of the speaker or chair, with the premier and other ministers in the front benches. Occasionally, due to space constraints, members of the governing party may also sit on the left. Members representing opposition parties are seated to the left, with the leader of the official opposition sitting opposite the premier.
Advertiser Disclosure: Some links to credit cards and other products on this website will earn an affiliate commission. Outside of banner ads published through the Boarding Area network, this compensation does not impact how and where products appear on this site. While we do try to list all the best miles and points deals, the site does not include all card companies or credit card offers available in the marketplace. Please view our advertising policy page for additional details about our partners.

✅ Verified Review | A330 seats are extremely uncomfortable. Airlines need to have a 'use-by' date on seat bottoms as older aircraft have seat bottoms which show a high degree of wear. It would seem a low cost to at least build in better cushioning in seats where the flights are 10 hours or more. Feels like some form of torture to make passengers sit in seats like this. A/V system is also very dated and laggy. Reinvest some of your profits in improved seats and a/V systems. Aisles ridiculously narrow.
The airline may change the aircraft type before you travel, so the seat numbers you have selected might either change, or not be in the position that you had expected. There are also many instances where the airline’s “system” may decide to re-allocate your chosen seat to another passenger – and you will be left trying to resolve this at airport check in (possibly with no success!)
By tradition, members of the governing party occupy the seats to the right of the speaker or chair, with the premier and other ministers in the front benches. Occasionally, due to space constraints, members of the governing party may also sit on the left. Members representing opposition parties are seated to the left, with the leader of the official opposition sitting opposite the premier.
Basically, Air Canada has decided to shove more seats in every class onto this aircraft at the expense of comfort and space, and every passenger is short-changed as a result. The 777-300ER that normally takes 359 passengers is being converted to 458 passengers - mine was one of them. The passenger loses. I have read that it is a plan to reduce cost per seat by 15%. It is a total disgrace - avoid this aircraft at all costs. Air Canada used to be a great airline but it is heading downhill. I have sent two emails, two letters to the LHR office and two letters to Calin Rovinescu: the CEO of Air Canada. No reply of any kind has been received to date. Air Canada really doesn't care anymore. If this is the way Air Canada is going, then it's time to change airlines folks.

I flew JFK-KEF last year on DL. It was announced that by the day of my trip it was supposed to be on a flat-bed configuration. Instead it was a recliner, no pre-take-off sparkling as they provisioned for a domestic flight and gave away ear-buds instead of noise cancelling headphones for the same reason. Complained to DL and got 50k points re-deposited for a 125k redemption. I believe that on the longer MSP:KEF route it’s consistently flat-beds.
On many long haul aircraft, some passengers will find that their footspace (ie the area under the seat in front) is impacted by the location of the control box for the IFE (inflight entertainment). This is something that is gradually being changed and improved by seat suppliers, but don’t expect quick results. Across many airlines, this IFE control box might be located in the aisle seat footwell area, although for some it is the window or middle seat that suffers – so, no hard and fast rules here.
* Administration fee of $1. Only available on Sunwing Airline flights.*Inflight services vary by flight time and destination. Award-winning inflight service is applicable on all flights to the Caribbean, Central America and Mexico. For USA flights and flights within Canada click here for inclusions.*Complimentary 23kg baggage allowance applies to first checked item of luggage only and cannot be shared across multiple pieces of luggage. Complimentary checked baggage allowance is available on all flights booked as part of a vacation package to the Caribbean, Central America and Mexico as well as cruise vacation packages. (Complimentary baggage allowance does not apply to flight only bookings, luggage fees apply)
Also, the exit row seats will not have a PTV entertainment screen on the back of the seat in front (as most seats), but will have the video screen stored in the armrest – similar for the meal tray table which will be stored in your armrest. Because of this design layout, you might find that the actual seat width is less than ordinary seats, and it can be quite cumbersome using the PTV and tray tables – guess it is a case of measuring that against the benefit of extended leg space you will get.
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When booking online, a few operators allow you to book a specific seat from a graphic numbered seating plan if you book directly on their own website - such operators include Eurostar at www.eurostar.com (only after payment, using the 'manage a booking' link), German Railways at www.bahn.de (but only for German domestic journeys on German IC or ICE trains), Swedish Railways at www.sj.se, Spanish railways at www.renfe.com (but only for Spanish domestic journeys and only if you buy a Promo+ fare or higher) and a few others.  But these tend to be the exceptions, it's only for their own trains in their own country, and if you buy from a third party site you won't get that functionality, it's only if you book with the operator directly at their own site.  Most other booking sites only let you choose 'aisle' or 'window'.  If you want to book a specific seat on any other train, you'll need to book by phone, preferably with an agency that uses the relevant country's own reservation system.  For example, if you call SNCF or (in the USA or Canada) Rail Europe, these use the French Railways reservation & ticketing system and can easily book a specific seat on a French TGV.  But they can usually only select basic options such as 'aisle' or 'window' when booking a German or Italian or Spanish train.  Conversely, the German Railways UK office obviously uses the German reservation and ticketing system, they can easily book you a specific seat or type of seat on a German ICE, but can only access basic options such as 'aisle' or 'window' on Eurostar or on a French or Italian train.  There's a list of UK booking agencies here, if you really want to book a specific seat then try calling an agency with the most relevant reservation system.
Aside from the obvious fact that being seated next to or right behind the toilet can result in unpleasant odours etc wafting around you, the toilet flush is extremely noisy on most aircraft, and you will find this incessant noise interruption very annoying after several hours of constant repetition. During the darkness / sleep periods you might also tire of the light intrusion every time passengers open the washroom door – and similar to some bulkhead/exit seat positions, you will find that there are often a lot of passengers milling around your seat area as they queue for the washroom.
✅ Trip Verified | The most uncomfortable long haul flight I have been on. I was seated in row 38, an aisle seat on the Boeing 787-9. I am fairly close to average size (barely 6 feet tall and 185 pounds), so not tiny but neither am I a giant by any means. My knees were just about touching the seat in front of me, the seats are very narrow, and thankfully the passenger seated in the middle seat was not large but he did fill the seat and needed all his elbow room. The seats are very short, offering little or no support to the thighs. This adds to the discomfort, particularly on a long flight. I could not stretch both my legs out fully at all while seated. Trying to use some of the aisle is next to impossible due to the extremely narrow aisles. There is barely room for the refreshment carts to pass. I spent a great deal of time on the flight moving my arm and shoulder inwards as the carts and other passengers were passing and bumping into me and there was no space. Seat backs are very thin and offer no support either. Due to all the factors mentioned, I found sleep to be impossible. The passenger at the window seat managed about an hour's sleep but basically had the same complaint, and needed muscle relaxers for her back towards the end of the flight. Anyone getting out of their seats found it necessary to pull on the seat in front of them for balance and leverage. For relief, I got up to stand and stretch at the rear of the plane 3 times on the eastbound flight and 4 times on the westbound leg. Also, on the outbound flight, our connection was a little late so we went straight to board our London flight without buying snacks, etc. Be warned, we found out on board that in economy you cannot buy snacks. You have to content yourself with the dinner and continental breakfast and I think you get a very small bag of pretzels with a drink. Cabin is beautiful. The in-flight entertainment system was excellent, although some people were asking why wi-fi was not available. The selection of movies, TV programs, and interactive games was OK for me. In summary, I will do everything I possibly can to avoid using this aircraft again. If it even means connecting through another city, I will do it. Three days later, I am still feeling the effects.
Basically, Air Canada has decided to shove more seats in every class onto this aircraft at the expense of comfort and space, and every passenger is short-changed as a result. The 777-300ER that normally takes 359 passengers is being converted to 458 passengers - mine was one of them. The passenger loses. I have read that it is a plan to reduce cost per seat by 15%. It is a total disgrace - avoid this aircraft at all costs. Air Canada used to be a great airline but it is heading downhill. I have sent two emails, two letters to the LHR office and two letters to Calin Rovinescu: the CEO of Air Canada. No reply of any kind has been received to date. Air Canada really doesn't care anymore. If this is the way Air Canada is going, then it's time to change airlines folks.
I am Elite Air Canada member for over 10 years but flying economy in this plane makes me say NEVER again. I strongly advise against anyone choosing this airplane. The new 3-4-4 crammed configuration is horrendous. Too tight. But AC flights are still full.... that's why they cram in so many seats. Disgusted with the configuration. Food - AWFUL. Had a small meal right after take off in FRA and nothing again until 1h from YYZ - and it was a tiny little horrible pie inside a cardboard box. That's it!! Attendants were not exactly friendly. Avoid at all costs!!!
✅ Trip Verified | The flight was too cramped up with no space for cabin luggage. My cabin bag had to be kept in the business class as they had no space. I remember pressing the button for air hostess help at least 4 times and every time no body showed and the request button was reset. Overall a bad experience and I would not recommend travelling with Air Canada.
Avoid e and f seats if possible. the seat supports are misaligned so you have to try and put one fut on each side of the support. The aisle row people claim this as their area forcing you to try to stretch one leg at a time. My wife couldn't even get her purse under the seat. There are also some posts for power which makes this even worse. Quick summary avoid the economy e and f seats.
Flew Vancouver to Sydney (return) in business. Air Canada's new business class seats are awful. Lie flat seats are not even and not flat. I am 5'10" and I just fit; if you are taller, you cannot stretch out. But, most frustrating.... the fixed non-movable table means you cannot turn over or bend your legs to get more comfortable. They must get rid of that table for me to ever fly them again in an overnight flight. That said, food great, service great, entertainment OK. But back to the drawing board on bed/table, please.
Most airlines now charge an additional fee to sit in the exit rows, others will allocate at check-in (remarkably some airlines still favour these seats for much taller passengers!). You do get a lot more legroom in an exit seat, but on the downside there are a few points to remember. You will not be allowed to keep any items of hand-luggage (even books etc sometimes) by your seat/footwell area during landing and take-off periods, and as the bins above your seat may be full by the time you realise, you will have to hope for a cooperative cabin crew that will take these items off you at these periods and return them after take-off and landing!
We flew LHR-YVR on this aircraft and were fortunate to have a whole row of 4 seats between the two of us, allowing us to spread out. If the row had been full, my companion in 61F would have been very squashed as the seats are quite narrow. The in-flight service was much better than I expected it to be - full meal departing LHR, mid-flight snack and ice-cream, then hot snack before arrival in YVR.

Aside from the obvious fact that being seated next to or right behind the toilet can result in unpleasant odours etc wafting around you, the toilet flush is extremely noisy on most aircraft, and you will find this incessant noise interruption very annoying after several hours of constant repetition. During the darkness / sleep periods you might also tire of the light intrusion every time passengers open the washroom door – and similar to some bulkhead/exit seat positions, you will find that there are often a lot of passengers milling around your seat area as they queue for the washroom.
We spend a lot of time getting our seating charts/seat maps right because we know how important they are when deciding which event to attend. When possible, we’ll provide you with photos of actual seat views from different locations in a venue. You can go to our Air Canada Centre seat views page to see them. Air Canada Centre can hold up to 19,800 people but that's a lot of seats and therefore a lot of potential seat views. We wish we had all 19,800 individual seat views for Air Canada Centre but we don't, therefore the seat views we show are usually a sample from different sections in a venue.
Hi all, took AC flight from Montreal to Dublin Ireland on the 737 max 8, had the two first row seats on right hand side of plane going to Dublin, for me at 6 feet legs had little room in the aisle seat, however on the return flight we were on the left hand side of plane and I felt that my aisle seat had a bit more legroom! Have photos but cannot figure how to get them onto this site, the seats for comfort are OK, but I would not “rave” about them though they are more comfy than those sitting in economy. AC for 2019 seems to be using the Airbus 330-300 for Montreal to Dublin flights, not sure how comfy the premium economy will be on that plane depending on their configuration for those flights. Any comments from anyone ? 

On the way back from HKG, I paid up and got the Business Class (can't remember the seat#, it was window). While obviously it is a much improved seat versus Econ, the layout, and setup is horrendous for a business class charging thousands. The seat is so uncomfortable in any seating position you try to constantly adjust it, your knee hits the side of the seat, and if you get unlucky and get a window seat, you literally must climb over the passenger next to you to get out, are you kidding me? Further, due to more seats cramped the service is suffered compared to regular 777, 330, or 767.
Air Canada have revamped their pods in business class and the result is not good. They are narrower than before and taper very abruptly at the end, which means your feet are crammed together uncomfortably. I got very little sleep and had little luck distracting myself with the inflight entertainment,which now appears to be little more than an afterthought. The music choices were miserably poor: just four or five pieces in each category. On the plus side, the food was much better than a year ago.
Advertiser Disclosure: Some links to credit cards and other products on this website will earn an affiliate commission. Outside of banner ads published through the Boarding Area network, this compensation does not impact how and where products appear on this site. While we do try to list all the best miles and points deals, the site does not include all card companies or credit card offers available in the marketplace. Please view our advertising policy page for additional details about our partners.
Also, the exit row seats will not have a PTV entertainment screen on the back of the seat in front (as most seats), but will have the video screen stored in the armrest – similar for the meal tray table which will be stored in your armrest. Because of this design layout, you might find that the actual seat width is less than ordinary seats, and it can be quite cumbersome using the PTV and tray tables – guess it is a case of measuring that against the benefit of extended leg space you will get.
Just flew on Air Canada’s 737 max 8 for the first time between Montreal and Vancouver in economy. I have flown Air Canada’s older A320, 777, 787 and CRJ900 and by comparison found myself for the first time having problems with leg room. I am 5’10 and my knees were already touching the seat in front. It seems like economy is really configured with seating of 30″ pitch, an economy seat spacing less that that of other Air Canada aircraft. I was traveling in the same row as a passenger seated by the aisle and at around 6′ height, he had to angle his legs other into the aisle or into the space of the middle seat passenger. Not the best situation. Considering the flight was about 5 hours in duration and that the same aircraft is used for transatlantic flights I find it hard to understand why Air Canada configured their aircraft in such a manner. Seat comfort isn’t the only issue. For passengers in economy it is necessary to access the aft cabin which is normally a zone separated for crew to work in the galley. Instead in this aircraft that space is now subdivided such that the right hand side of the aft cabin is devoted to the galley and the left hand side has access to two lavatories adjoined side by side. In line with the minimalist seating, the lavatories are also space savers featuring inward opening bi-fold doors. It has the same feeling as walking into a closet. To sum up the economy class experience flying the Air Canada 737 max 8 has less personal space and comfort compared to a regional jet that operates on flight durations that demand wide-body aircraft comfort.
Just flew on Air Canada’s 737 max 8 for the first time between Montreal and Vancouver in economy. I have flown Air Canada’s older A320, 777, 787 and CRJ900 and by comparison found myself for the first time having problems with leg room. I am 5’10 and my knees were already touching the seat in front. It seems like economy is really configured with seating of 30″ pitch, an economy seat spacing less that that of other Air Canada aircraft. I was traveling in the same row as a passenger seated by the aisle and at around 6′ height, he had to angle his legs other into the aisle or into the space of the middle seat passenger. Not the best situation. Considering the flight was about 5 hours in duration and that the same aircraft is used for transatlantic flights I find it hard to understand why Air Canada configured their aircraft in such a manner. Seat comfort isn’t the only issue. For passengers in economy it is necessary to access the aft cabin which is normally a zone separated for crew to work in the galley. Instead in this aircraft that space is now subdivided such that the right hand side of the aft cabin is devoted to the galley and the left hand side has access to two lavatories adjoined side by side. In line with the minimalist seating, the lavatories are also space savers featuring inward opening bi-fold doors. It has the same feeling as walking into a closet. To sum up the economy class experience flying the Air Canada 737 max 8 has less personal space and comfort compared to a regional jet that operates on flight durations that demand wide-body aircraft comfort.
On many long haul aircraft, some passengers will find that their footspace (ie the area under the seat in front) is impacted by the location of the control box for the IFE (inflight entertainment). This is something that is gradually being changed and improved by seat suppliers, but don’t expect quick results. Across many airlines, this IFE control box might be located in the aisle seat footwell area, although for some it is the window or middle seat that suffers – so, no hard and fast rules here.
We flew LHR-YVR on this aircraft and were fortunate to have a whole row of 4 seats between the two of us, allowing us to spread out. If the row had been full, my companion in 61F would have been very squashed as the seats are quite narrow. The in-flight service was much better than I expected it to be - full meal departing LHR, mid-flight snack and ice-cream, then hot snack before arrival in YVR.

✅ Trip Verified | We travelled Air Canada from Montreal to LAX yesterday in Business Class. The plane is a new Boeing 737. It seems like Air Canada is following the Rouge tradition by having the most uncomfortable seats imaginable even on a brand new plane. The thickness of the back cushion is very thin and there is a horizontal rod that is placed it seems to cause maximum discomfort. This flight is 6 hours! The foot rests are also extraordinarily cheap and won’t go down unless you get on your knees and manipulate it manually. Also, just like horrible Rouge, the seat posts are positioned so that you cannot store any hand luggage in front of your seat . The middle section has to be shared by seat neighbors. Air Canada used to be our favorite airline and now we have advised our travel agent to research any alternative to Air Canada and Rouge.
Another important point with the extended space around the exit rows, is that on some flights you might find that passengers from elsewhere in the cabin decide that this is a good place to congregate and chat, do their stretching exercises etc, and it can therefore prove a rather busy place. It is also always worth watching out for those middle seat rows in the aircraft that look like there is a lot of legroom – this might be the case, but you can find that your hoped for space in front is being used as a cabin cross-over passage, as passengers go to the washrooms etc.
We spend a lot of time getting our seating charts/seat maps right because we know how important they are when deciding which event to attend. When possible, we’ll provide you with photos of actual seat views from different locations in a venue. You can go to our Air Canada Centre seat views page to see them. Air Canada Centre can hold up to 19,800 people but that's a lot of seats and therefore a lot of potential seat views. We wish we had all 19,800 individual seat views for Air Canada Centre but we don't, therefore the seat views we show are usually a sample from different sections in a venue.
Flew Vancouver to Sydney (return) in business. Air Canada's new business class seats are awful. Lie flat seats are not even and not flat. I am 5'10" and I just fit; if you are taller, you cannot stretch out. But, most frustrating.... the fixed non-movable table means you cannot turn over or bend your legs to get more comfortable. They must get rid of that table for me to ever fly them again in an overnight flight. That said, food great, service great, entertainment OK. But back to the drawing board on bed/table, please.
While not surprising, Air Canada will sell the forward cabin of these transatlantic flights as business class, even though the seat isn’t really competitive internationally. Pricing seems to be comparable to what you’d pay for a flat bed on a 777 or 787. For example, a roundtrip ticket between Toronto and Shannon will run you ~$2,900. Logically it seems like they should market it as premium economy in terms of the product offering, but I guess they do this because they can get away with it.
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