Some trains have seats in open-plan saloons, indeed most modern trains have this sort of seating.  Some trains, often older ones and often in eastern Europe, have seats in traditional 6-seater compartments with a side corridor running the length of the car.  There are sliding (but non-lockable) doors to each compartment.  Very occasionally you'll find both sorts of seating on one train, and some booking systems (such as the German Railways site bahn.de or Austrian site oebb.at) will ask you which you prefer.  Unless you're in a group of 5 or 6 people, most travellers prefer open-plan saloon seating, which also gives you a better view out as you can view diagonally forwards and backwards through all the coach windows, not just directly sideways through your own window.

✅ Trip Verified | This review is based on exit row 31 on the Boeing 787-8. I was in seat 31J from Vancouver to Brisbane, a nearly 15 hour flight. I specifically chose this seat due to the extra legroom it provided. On this particular flight it was $150 extra to select the seat as it is classified as preferred (not to be confused with premium economy). When we boarded the plane there was a small overhead bin above our row that was able to fit all of my and my partners bags (2 backpacks, a suit bag and a shopping bag of snacks) as we were unable to store anything for takeoff. I was expecting brief instructions from one of the flight attendants on how the emergency door worked as we were right beside it however this never happened, I assume because there was a flight attendant jump seat facing us on the other side of the exit. Once the flight took off and the seatbelt sign was off we were able to get a few things from the overhead bin above and had no issues from the flight attendants storing the on the floor, we just made sure there were right against our seat so as to not block the emergency exit. The tray tables were in the armrests which made it difficult to get too if the person beside you was asleep with their arm on the opening. The entertainment screen was a folding arm below the armrest that swung up in front of you. For me it was not high enough and it did not quite sit centred in front of you which was slightly annoying.There were also 2 power supply outlets located on either side of the middle seat, nearly at the ground. I consider myself a tall with an average build (190cm 90kg, 6' 2" 200lb) but the seats were exceptionally comfortable compared to other economy seats. The recline was average and the moveable headrest was ideal for someone as tall as I am. With the new 787s the seats recline in a way where your seat moves forward slightly when you recline the back. I can see this being an issue when you already have limited legroom, but for this seat it was a nice touch as it seemed to be more comfortable than just the back reclining. The extra legroom was the true winner though. You basically had unlimited legroom as the next row of seats was about 1.5 to 2 meters away. I could stretch my legs out as much as I want and with the unique way the seats recline I believe it was the most comfortable you could be trying to sleep in a seated position. The biggest downside was that in the centre was the washrooms, one on each aisle. Although you could not smell anything for the duration of the flight, the door was quite loud when people let is slam. Also people would line up for the washroom in the area directly in front of you. At one point in the middle of a deep sleep a gentleman tripped over my legs as he was waiting in line and fell right on top of me! Other than that the flight went smoothly, I just put some earplugs in and that drowned out most of the people, children and washroom door slamming. I managed to get about 10 hours of sleep in 2 different periods, which made the 15 hour flight fly by.


@Lucky: “While I imagine these planes will still be primarily used for shorter flights, the decision to fly them transatlantic is interesting.” AC uses these for everything and anything since they freely swap between their widebodies and narrowbodies on flights in North America. So, in other words, we’ll be riding this from Halifax to Vancouver (5.5 hours), Montreal to SFO (5 hours), etc. etc. Lots of looooong flights, so I don’t see why they similarly lengthy European flight is any different.
These planes are configured in two classes of service, with very nice lie-flat sleeper suites in Executive First Class. Pioneered by Virgin Atlantic, the seats are arranged in a herringbone fashion, angled at about 45 degrees to the direction of flight, and might take a little getting used to. Due to the angle of the seats, those that want a view out the window will really have to turn their head. However, every seat is an aisle seat and there is no need to climb over your neighbor or wake them in the middle of the flight.
Ensure you get the seat you want with Sunwing Airlines advanced seat selection. Whether you prefer a window seat or an aisle seat, or want to make sure you’re sitting with your family and friends, for just an extra $20 you can secure the seat you want. Pre-book and choose your seat ahead of time to avoid any unnecessary pre-departure stress; just sit back, relax and enjoy Sunwing’s award-winning inflight service.
This is a matter of personal choice, but on widebody aircraft you will generally find that the front of the Economy cabin is the quietest, normally just in front of the aircraft engines. The rear of the cabin tends to be noisiest from an engine noise perspective, and this also tends to bump around more during turbulence – of course, on less than full flights, you normally find that there are more empty seats at the back of the plane where you can spread out. For the meal services, it is difficult to suggest where you are more likely to be offered the full choice of meals before they run out! Some airlines start meal services from the front of the cabin, some the middle, and a few from the back of the cabin!

You can check train compositions for domestic and international trains to, from or within the Czech Republic and Slovakia at www.zelpage.cz/razeni.  You can search by train number (enter it in the box at the top) or click on a train category (for example, EuroNight or EuroCity) to see a list of trains.  When you get to the train composition page, click on a carriage for specific carriage information, including a seat or berth numbering plan if they have one.

Flew Vancouver to Sydney (return) in business. Air Canada's new business class seats are awful. Lie flat seats are not even and not flat. I am 5'10" and I just fit; if you are taller, you cannot stretch out. But, most frustrating.... the fixed non-movable table means you cannot turn over or bend your legs to get more comfortable. They must get rid of that table for me to ever fly them again in an overnight flight. That said, food great, service great, entertainment OK. But back to the drawing board on bed/table, please.
If you are over 6" and weigh more than 200lbs, you will not fit in economy. Entire layout is designed for 5"11 & under 180lbs. Which is curious because the head room is ~10-11ft - crazy. You can stand comfortably if your 6'8, but can't sit. Another oddity; the overhead bin does not accommondate carry on's that are 1CM over lentgh minimums. Mine is .5CM (measured) over published Air Canada minimums and would not fit in overhead bin, even though on all Airbus, Embraer, Bombardier models the carry on fits fine. Ridiculous. Not sure on other rows, but the touch button control of lights etc. is on the inside of the armrest so rest assured your leg will often trigger lights on/off inadvertantly. Saw others with controls on the armrest itself (top) and heard complaints. If comfort/practicality are important, avoid this model.
On the way back from HKG, I paid up and got the Business Class (can't remember the seat#, it was window). While obviously it is a much improved seat versus Econ, the layout, and setup is horrendous for a business class charging thousands. The seat is so uncomfortable in any seating position you try to constantly adjust it, your knee hits the side of the seat, and if you get unlucky and get a window seat, you literally must climb over the passenger next to you to get out, are you kidding me? Further, due to more seats cramped the service is suffered compared to regular 777, 330, or 767.
If you are over 6" and weigh more than 200lbs, you will not fit in economy. Entire layout is designed for 5"11 & under 180lbs. Which is curious because the head room is ~10-11ft - crazy. You can stand comfortably if your 6'8, but can't sit. Another oddity; the overhead bin does not accommondate carry on's that are 1CM over lentgh minimums. Mine is .5CM (measured) over published Air Canada minimums and would not fit in overhead bin, even though on all Airbus, Embraer, Bombardier models the carry on fits fine. Ridiculous. Not sure on other rows, but the touch button control of lights etc. is on the inside of the armrest so rest assured your leg will often trigger lights on/off inadvertantly. Saw others with controls on the armrest itself (top) and heard complaints. If comfort/practicality are important, avoid this model.
Hi all, took AC flight from Montreal to Dublin Ireland on the 737 max 8, had the two first row seats on right hand side of plane going to Dublin, for me at 6 feet legs had little room in the aisle seat, however on the return flight we were on the left hand side of plane and I felt that my aisle seat had a bit more legroom! Have photos but cannot figure how to get them onto this site, the seats for comfort are OK, but I would not “rave” about them though they are more comfy than those sitting in economy. AC for 2019 seems to be using the Airbus 330-300 for Montreal to Dublin flights, not sure how comfy the premium economy will be on that plane depending on their configuration for those flights. Any comments from anyone ?
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