On the way back from HKG, I paid up and got the Business Class (can't remember the seat#, it was window). While obviously it is a much improved seat versus Econ, the layout, and setup is horrendous for a business class charging thousands. The seat is so uncomfortable in any seating position you try to constantly adjust it, your knee hits the side of the seat, and if you get unlucky and get a window seat, you literally must climb over the passenger next to you to get out, are you kidding me? Further, due to more seats cramped the service is suffered compared to regular 777, 330, or 767.
Our team were unanimous in selecting seats A or C, H or K in Rows 31-34 on this aircraft. On the plus side, you are at the quietest end of the cabin, will be amongst the first to deplane at destination, and stand a good choice of getting the full choice of meals on offer. Toilets are all to the rear, so no odours or queuing passengers nearby. On the downside, if the bassinet seats in Row 29/30 are full occupied by families with babies, there is a chance of occasional crying etc – so a good noise-cancelling headset would be a must.
Founded in 1937, Air Canada (AC) is Canada's largest airline as well as its flag carrier. It operates from hubs at Calgary International Airport (YYC), Montréal–Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport (YUL), Toronto Pearson International Airport (YYZ) and Vancouver International Airport (YVR). A member of the Star Alliance, Air Canada and its subsidiaries fly to more than 185 destinations in North America, Central America, South America, the Caribbean, Europe, the Middle East, Asia and Australia. It also has codeshare agreements with about 30 other carriers. Its fleet of 175 aircraft consists of one-cabin (Economy Class), two-cabin (Economy Class and either Business Class or Premium Economy Class) and three-cabin (Business Class, Premium Economy Class and Economy Class) configurations.
Flying these days is often a huge hassle: You have to get to the airport early to make sure you get through security in time, and then there's the issue of the flight itself. One of the biggest issues related to your comfort and a pleasant trip is where you sit: how much legroom the seat has, how wide it is, and how much overhead bin space there is above you for your carry-on luggage. Other considerations include trying to avoid the middle seat in a group of three, getting your preference for a window or an aisle seat, and sitting close to the front of the section so you can deplane more quickly. If you pick a good seat, it makes the whole journey a lot better.

These planes are configured in two classes of service, with very nice lie-flat sleeper suites in Executive First Class. Pioneered by Virgin Atlantic, the seats are arranged in a herringbone fashion, angled at about 45 degrees to the direction of flight, and might take a little getting used to. Due to the angle of the seats, those that want a view out the window will really have to turn their head. However, every seat is an aisle seat and there is no need to climb over your neighbor or wake them in the middle of the flight.

I flew JFK-KEF last year on DL. It was announced that by the day of my trip it was supposed to be on a flat-bed configuration. Instead it was a recliner, no pre-take-off sparkling as they provisioned for a domestic flight and gave away ear-buds instead of noise cancelling headphones for the same reason. Complained to DL and got 50k points re-deposited for a 125k redemption. I believe that on the longer MSP:KEF route it’s consistently flat-beds.
Airline seat pitch guides give you an indication of how much legroom you can expect. Economy class cabins on long haul flights generally offer 31 to 32 inches seat pitch (the industry standard), with a smaller number of airlines providing 33 to 35 inches of seat pitch. The higher the seat pitch, the fewer the number of seats an airline can fit into the cabin, so in present economic times do not expect to see airlines increasing seat pitch standards! It is important to remember that newer “slimline” seats do mean that a 32 inch seat pitch can offer as much personal legroom space as an older type of seat in a 34 inch seat pitch.
Awful!! This flight was 12 hours from Tokyo direct to Toronto. Seats VERY narrow and limited leg room. My legs in 34B kept going numb due to the uncomfortable angle of the seats. The tray was slightly larger than my iPad and impossibly small food trays left no room to put your drink (tray completely covered the tray's beverage indent). When passenger in front reclined, tray was on an angle. We will never again fly on this aircraft!
On many long haul aircraft, some passengers will find that their footspace (ie the area under the seat in front) is impacted by the location of the control box for the IFE (inflight entertainment). This is something that is gradually being changed and improved by seat suppliers, but don’t expect quick results. Across many airlines, this IFE control box might be located in the aisle seat footwell area, although for some it is the window or middle seat that suffers – so, no hard and fast rules here.
The airline may change the aircraft type before you travel, so the seat numbers you have selected might either change, or not be in the position that you had expected. There are also many instances where the airline’s “system” may decide to re-allocate your chosen seat to another passenger – and you will be left trying to resolve this at airport check in (possibly with no success!)
Flying these days is often a huge hassle: You have to get to the airport early to make sure you get through security in time, and then there's the issue of the flight itself. One of the biggest issues related to your comfort and a pleasant trip is where you sit: how much legroom the seat has, how wide it is, and how much overhead bin space there is above you for your carry-on luggage. Other considerations include trying to avoid the middle seat in a group of three, getting your preference for a window or an aisle seat, and sitting close to the front of the section so you can deplane more quickly. If you pick a good seat, it makes the whole journey a lot better.
The new business class studio pod is TERRIBLE - narrow, short and ridiculously sized and shaped. It's okay as a seat, but I paid for a good night's sleep. Forget it! I'm 6ft 4 and when the seat turns into a bed, it slides the lower half of your body into a tiny plastic coffin-like box (in the area under the armrests of the two passengers in front) with no room to move your legs at all, and it wasn't long enough for me - so it wasn't humanly possible to lie down!! Hell on earth. As a result, I arrived at LHR tired and irritable, lacking the sleep I had needed and deliberately paid for. The cabin crew was brilliant, but they told me that a lot of other business class passengers had complained about this new seat. It's also difficult to get the seat back up again from a supposed "bed". My seat 2A on C-FIVO was also missing a seat-based flexible reading light. It is a reasonably new aircraft so why on earth was that missing?

Founded in 1937, Air Canada (AC) is Canada's largest airline as well as its flag carrier. It operates from hubs at Calgary International Airport (YYC), Montréal–Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport (YUL), Toronto Pearson International Airport (YYZ) and Vancouver International Airport (YVR). A member of the Star Alliance, Air Canada and its subsidiaries fly to more than 185 destinations in North America, Central America, South America, the Caribbean, Europe, the Middle East, Asia and Australia. It also has codeshare agreements with about 30 other carriers. Its fleet of 175 aircraft consists of one-cabin (Economy Class), two-cabin (Economy Class and either Business Class or Premium Economy Class) and three-cabin (Business Class, Premium Economy Class and Economy Class) configurations.
By tradition, members of the governing party occupy the seats to the right of the speaker or chair, with the premier and other ministers in the front benches. Occasionally, due to space constraints, members of the governing party may also sit on the left. Members representing opposition parties are seated to the left, with the leader of the official opposition sitting opposite the premier.
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