I am 6'5" tall, and these biz class seats are too short for lie-flat seating. Besides being too short, they taper uncomfortably at the feet, which reminds me of squeezing into a test tube or a mummy sleeping bag. For mostly-reclined seating the seat is OK, although the bottom cushion is too thin and I could feel the hard support beneath it. Lack of lumbar support, while true, didn't bother me too much. On the plus side, the light in the foot well is thoughtful, and I found the other lighting more than adequate. A dimmer control for the bright reading light would be good. The storage space for small stuff was very good.

Happy about their decision to keep the IFE! Was worried they would claim “everyone brings a phone/tablet with their own TV shows and movies” and cheap out like American did. AC is definitely one of the better airlines when it comes to installing IFE’s on pretty much their whole fleet. They even have IFE’s on their AC Express CRJ-700s! Only aircraft smaller than the CRJ-700s don’t have IFE’s and those fly short enough routes anyways.


✅ Verified Review | A330 seats are extremely uncomfortable. Airlines need to have a 'use-by' date on seat bottoms as older aircraft have seat bottoms which show a high degree of wear. It would seem a low cost to at least build in better cushioning in seats where the flights are 10 hours or more. Feels like some form of torture to make passengers sit in seats like this. A/V system is also very dated and laggy. Reinvest some of your profits in improved seats and a/V systems. Aisles ridiculously narrow.
Being seated next to or opposite the Galley areas can also be a bad choice – you will find that the level of pedestrian traffic (cabin staff and passengers) is much higher, the curtains may not always be kept shut so you get light intrusion, and as hard as staff might try, the preparation and clearance of meals will result in the galleys being quite noisy for these periods of the flight.
Aside from the obvious fact that being seated next to or right behind the toilet can result in unpleasant odours etc wafting around you, the toilet flush is extremely noisy on most aircraft, and you will find this incessant noise interruption very annoying after several hours of constant repetition. During the darkness / sleep periods you might also tire of the light intrusion every time passengers open the washroom door – and similar to some bulkhead/exit seat positions, you will find that there are often a lot of passengers milling around your seat area as they queue for the washroom.
For a newly designed plane I was surprised that the seats very narrow and legroom limited compared to older planes. I am 6'3" and 210lbs and I was unable to stretch both feet out at the same time. I took the advice of a previous reviewer at changed my seat to 60A as there were 2 seats rather than 3 in the outside row. I had more shoulder room as I could lean to one side can't imagine 5 hours in a row with 10 seats across.
I will be flying on this plane from Montreal to London in July. There will be three of us in row 28 ABC - my son will have the window, I will be in the middle and my husband will have the aisle. There are two sections after premium economy, ours is the first one. I see on the SeatGuru website that the seats behind us have alerts - they back onto the exit door area and have limited recline ability. Hence, will this mean I will have limited recline ability unless I want to be a jerk and lean back into someone's face while I sleep through a night flight?
The airline may change the aircraft type before you travel, so the seat numbers you have selected might either change, or not be in the position that you had expected. There are also many instances where the airline’s “system” may decide to re-allocate your chosen seat to another passenger – and you will be left trying to resolve this at airport check in (possibly with no success!)
Some trains have seats in open-plan saloons, indeed most modern trains have this sort of seating.  Some trains, often older ones and often in eastern Europe, have seats in traditional 6-seater compartments with a side corridor running the length of the car.  There are sliding (but non-lockable) doors to each compartment.  Very occasionally you'll find both sorts of seating on one train, and some booking systems (such as the German Railways site bahn.de or Austrian site oebb.at) will ask you which you prefer.  Unless you're in a group of 5 or 6 people, most travellers prefer open-plan saloon seating, which also gives you a better view out as you can view diagonally forwards and backwards through all the coach windows, not just directly sideways through your own window.
Some trains have seats in open-plan saloons, indeed most modern trains have this sort of seating.  Some trains, often older ones and often in eastern Europe, have seats in traditional 6-seater compartments with a side corridor running the length of the car.  There are sliding (but non-lockable) doors to each compartment.  Very occasionally you'll find both sorts of seating on one train, and some booking systems (such as the German Railways site bahn.de or Austrian site oebb.at) will ask you which you prefer.  Unless you're in a group of 5 or 6 people, most travellers prefer open-plan saloon seating, which also gives you a better view out as you can view diagonally forwards and backwards through all the coach windows, not just directly sideways through your own window.
A couple of weeks ago I booked Business Class on Air Canada from Western Canada to Shannon via Toronto for summer 2018. A few days ago I received an itinerary update, stating that my transatlantic flight was now Premium Economy. I called Air Canada Reservations and said that if they were withdrawing Business Class, I was withdrawing my fare. The agent said that there had been a change of aircraft and there was no Business Class on the new aircraft (737 Max). So I cancelled my flights without penalty and the agent rebooked me on the same flights, same seats, Premium Economy, for half the original fare. This proves that they are just trying to get away with calling it Business Class if they can. Don’t be fooled!
Flying these days is often a huge hassle: You have to get to the airport early to make sure you get through security in time, and then there's the issue of the flight itself. One of the biggest issues related to your comfort and a pleasant trip is where you sit: how much legroom the seat has, how wide it is, and how much overhead bin space there is above you for your carry-on luggage. Other considerations include trying to avoid the middle seat in a group of three, getting your preference for a window or an aisle seat, and sitting close to the front of the section so you can deplane more quickly. If you pick a good seat, it makes the whole journey a lot better. 

Some trains have seats in open-plan saloons, indeed most modern trains have this sort of seating.  Some trains, often older ones and often in eastern Europe, have seats in traditional 6-seater compartments with a side corridor running the length of the car.  There are sliding (but non-lockable) doors to each compartment.  Very occasionally you'll find both sorts of seating on one train, and some booking systems (such as the German Railways site bahn.de or Austrian site oebb.at) will ask you which you prefer.  Unless you're in a group of 5 or 6 people, most travellers prefer open-plan saloon seating, which also gives you a better view out as you can view diagonally forwards and backwards through all the coach windows, not just directly sideways through your own window. 

there is no space to keep anything that you may want handy on a flight, like your personal bag with your documents. the seat is tight, felt like I was in a casket in a straight position. small seat, narrow, short, poor support. the crew used the "space" as their holding area for cabin trolleys n people would stand around u waiting for the lavatory. no fun. i'm over 6' tall.
Aside from the obvious fact that being seated next to or right behind the toilet can result in unpleasant odours etc wafting around you, the toilet flush is extremely noisy on most aircraft, and you will find this incessant noise interruption very annoying after several hours of constant repetition. During the darkness / sleep periods you might also tire of the light intrusion every time passengers open the washroom door – and similar to some bulkhead/exit seat positions, you will find that there are often a lot of passengers milling around your seat area as they queue for the washroom.
✅ Trip Verified | The most uncomfortable long haul flight I have been on. I was seated in row 38, an aisle seat on the Boeing 787-9. I am fairly close to average size (barely 6 feet tall and 185 pounds), so not tiny but neither am I a giant by any means. My knees were just about touching the seat in front of me, the seats are very narrow, and thankfully the passenger seated in the middle seat was not large but he did fill the seat and needed all his elbow room. The seats are very short, offering little or no support to the thighs. This adds to the discomfort, particularly on a long flight. I could not stretch both my legs out fully at all while seated. Trying to use some of the aisle is next to impossible due to the extremely narrow aisles. There is barely room for the refreshment carts to pass. I spent a great deal of time on the flight moving my arm and shoulder inwards as the carts and other passengers were passing and bumping into me and there was no space. Seat backs are very thin and offer no support either. Due to all the factors mentioned, I found sleep to be impossible. The passenger at the window seat managed about an hour's sleep but basically had the same complaint, and needed muscle relaxers for her back towards the end of the flight. Anyone getting out of their seats found it necessary to pull on the seat in front of them for balance and leverage. For relief, I got up to stand and stretch at the rear of the plane 3 times on the eastbound flight and 4 times on the westbound leg. Also, on the outbound flight, our connection was a little late so we went straight to board our London flight without buying snacks, etc. Be warned, we found out on board that in economy you cannot buy snacks. You have to content yourself with the dinner and continental breakfast and I think you get a very small bag of pretzels with a drink. Cabin is beautiful. The in-flight entertainment system was excellent, although some people were asking why wi-fi was not available. The selection of movies, TV programs, and interactive games was OK for me. In summary, I will do everything I possibly can to avoid using this aircraft again. If it even means connecting through another city, I will do it. Three days later, I am still feeling the effects.
In addition, due to cramming so many seats into the Econ, there's less lavatories (long line-ups), no duty free onboard (no room), not enough room for carryon, and very poor service with long waits for food. Carryon bins were full half way through the boarding and it was chaos trying to fit your stuff. Forget about bringing 2 bags or jacket with you expecting it to fit overhead, meaning you need to keep those in your tiny seat further making it less comfortable.
As for Vij’s comparison to WestJet: their Plus seating is more pitch, a blocked middle seat with a free sandwich and snack (and unlimited complimentary booze). AC’s long haul J service includes 4 hot meal choices in china dishes, and two premium red, 2 premium whites as well as expanded beverages (Cranberry juice and Perrier). WestJet continues to charge for meals in Y on their overseas flights, AC still provides complimentary hot meals with choice of entrée and free booze in Y on Asia and Europe flights (not US, Mexico or Caribbean).
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