This was supposed to be an A330-300, however, the configuration was different than the seat choice map. This seems to be pretty common for Air Canada. The last time I flew this route it was in premium economy, however the premium economy had 4 seats in the middle and the "extra" legroom was not any better or worth the money over regular coach, so thought I would try bulkhead, row 18. I am not sure it was worth the seat cost. The person next to me asked to be moved even though he paid extra for the seat because he had a broken foot and it was more uncomfortable than regular economy where you can put your feet under the seat in front of you. This row perhaps had a bit more space from the back of the seat to the bulkhead, however the extra space for knees does not help your feet, and all bags need to go overhead. Having the seat next to me empty meant I could fold my legs over the tray table armrest that was not movable and stretch out a bit to sleep.
Our team were unanimous in selecting seats A or C, H or K in Rows 31-34 on this aircraft. On the plus side, you are at the quietest end of the cabin, will be amongst the first to deplane at destination, and stand a good choice of getting the full choice of meals on offer. Toilets are all to the rear, so no odours or queuing passengers nearby. On the downside, if the bassinet seats in Row 29/30 are full occupied by families with babies, there is a chance of occasional crying etc – so a good noise-cancelling headset would be a must.
It's a very small and cramped little nook on the air plane. I spent the extra $ to book a emergency exit row, and this time I regretted. There's no windows but tons of leg room. Also, there's absolutely no space to stow away your personal item bag. I was also on the plane with another man who was tall and large build which also made it uncomfortable for both of us. There are tons of people constantly coming in and out and wiating in front of you to use the washroom, so it also disruptive. Wouldn't recommend this seat if you are trying to catch some sleep.

Flew Vancouver to Sydney (return) in business. Air Canada's new business class seats are awful. Lie flat seats are not even and not flat. I am 5'10" and I just fit; if you are taller, you cannot stretch out. But, most frustrating.... the fixed non-movable table means you cannot turn over or bend your legs to get more comfortable. They must get rid of that table for me to ever fly them again in an overnight flight. That said, food great, service great, entertainment OK. But back to the drawing board on bed/table, please.
✅ Trip Verified | The Boeing 787 seats are too narrow. Its small to the point you cant get comfortable for the 9hr flight. Don't get me wrong. Im not expecting the best, but this is stupid. I flew last year and I thought it was in my head. But this time around its really the seats. Im 5'8, 160lb medium/slim build. My arms, elbows are too wide for the seat. In a Aisle seat my shoulder kept being hit. Its hard to rest you neck/head. The designers did a bad job of the ergonomics of the body sitting for 9 hours and how people sleep. The service of the airline is great.
Basically, Air Canada has decided to shove more seats in every class onto this aircraft at the expense of comfort and space, and every passenger is short-changed as a result. The 777-300ER that normally takes 359 passengers is being converted to 458 passengers - mine was one of them. The passenger loses. I have read that it is a plan to reduce cost per seat by 15%. It is a total disgrace - avoid this aircraft at all costs. Air Canada used to be a great airline but it is heading downhill. I have sent two emails, two letters to the LHR office and two letters to Calin Rovinescu: the CEO of Air Canada. No reply of any kind has been received to date. Air Canada really doesn't care anymore. If this is the way Air Canada is going, then it's time to change airlines folks.

Another important point with the extended space around the exit rows, is that on some flights you might find that passengers from elsewhere in the cabin decide that this is a good place to congregate and chat, do their stretching exercises etc, and it can therefore prove a rather busy place. It is also always worth watching out for those middle seat rows in the aircraft that look like there is a lot of legroom – this might be the case, but you can find that your hoped for space in front is being used as a cabin cross-over passage, as passengers go to the washrooms etc.


✅ Trip Verified | Flight attendants aren't overly friendly, but they are helpful and attentive, walking up and down the aisles quite often. Aside from the in-flight meal, the cabin crew does come around with drinks and more complimentary snacks quite often. Because Air Canada use a 3x4x3 layout for their 777, seats may feel a bit cramped. This is particularly noticeable when you're trying to have your in-flight meals and you're bumping elbows with your neighbour (the food is good though, even for economy class standards). I consider myself to be average build for someone who is 5'8, and those seats were still reasonably comfortable. I would say however that for the seats on the middle-column, under-seat stowage is odd, since you only get 3 holes for 4 people to put their bags under, which means your neighbour's carry-on may encroach on your legroom. These seats do offer good recline, as the back reclines as the seat cushion slides forward. With the amount of leg room you get, this typically doesn't reduce your legroom dramatically enough to be uncomfortable. Seats are also quite plushy yet offer adequate back support, and the they offer an adjustable leather headrest. You will also find that throughout the flight, the new 777-300ERs feature the Boeing 787 mood-lighting which gradually changes colour throughout the flight. It looks cool and I did rest well on the flight, but there is a relationship between mood lighting and the quality of my rest has yet to be determined.
Flew Vancouver to Sydney (return) in business. Air Canada's new business class seats are awful. Lie flat seats are not even and not flat. I am 5'10" and I just fit; if you are taller, you cannot stretch out. But, most frustrating.... the fixed non-movable table means you cannot turn over or bend your legs to get more comfortable. They must get rid of that table for me to ever fly them again in an overnight flight. That said, food great, service great, entertainment OK. But back to the drawing board on bed/table, please.
✅ Trip Verified | The flight was too cramped up with no space for cabin luggage. My cabin bag had to be kept in the business class as they had no space. I remember pressing the button for air hostess help at least 4 times and every time no body showed and the request button was reset. Overall a bad experience and I would not recommend travelling with Air Canada.
These planes are configured in two classes of service, with very nice lie-flat sleeper suites in Executive First Class. Pioneered by Virgin Atlantic, the seats are arranged in a herringbone fashion, angled at about 45 degrees to the direction of flight, and might take a little getting used to. Due to the angle of the seats, those that want a view out the window will really have to turn their head. However, every seat is an aisle seat and there is no need to climb over your neighbor or wake them in the middle of the flight.
✅ Trip Verified | The most uncomfortable long haul flight I have been on. I was seated in row 38, an aisle seat on the Boeing 787-9. I am fairly close to average size (barely 6 feet tall and 185 pounds), so not tiny but neither am I a giant by any means. My knees were just about touching the seat in front of me, the seats are very narrow, and thankfully the passenger seated in the middle seat was not large but he did fill the seat and needed all his elbow room. The seats are very short, offering little or no support to the thighs. This adds to the discomfort, particularly on a long flight. I could not stretch both my legs out fully at all while seated. Trying to use some of the aisle is next to impossible due to the extremely narrow aisles. There is barely room for the refreshment carts to pass. I spent a great deal of time on the flight moving my arm and shoulder inwards as the carts and other passengers were passing and bumping into me and there was no space. Seat backs are very thin and offer no support either. Due to all the factors mentioned, I found sleep to be impossible. The passenger at the window seat managed about an hour's sleep but basically had the same complaint, and needed muscle relaxers for her back towards the end of the flight. Anyone getting out of their seats found it necessary to pull on the seat in front of them for balance and leverage. For relief, I got up to stand and stretch at the rear of the plane 3 times on the eastbound flight and 4 times on the westbound leg. Also, on the outbound flight, our connection was a little late so we went straight to board our London flight without buying snacks, etc. Be warned, we found out on board that in economy you cannot buy snacks. You have to content yourself with the dinner and continental breakfast and I think you get a very small bag of pretzels with a drink. Cabin is beautiful. The in-flight entertainment system was excellent, although some people were asking why wi-fi was not available. The selection of movies, TV programs, and interactive games was OK for me. In summary, I will do everything I possibly can to avoid using this aircraft again. If it even means connecting through another city, I will do it. Three days later, I am still feeling the effects.
✅ Trip Verified | The Boeing 787 seats are too narrow. Its small to the point you cant get comfortable for the 9hr flight. Don't get me wrong. Im not expecting the best, but this is stupid. I flew last year and I thought it was in my head. But this time around its really the seats. Im 5'8, 160lb medium/slim build. My arms, elbows are too wide for the seat. In a Aisle seat my shoulder kept being hit. Its hard to rest you neck/head. The designers did a bad job of the ergonomics of the body sitting for 9 hours and how people sleep. The service of the airline is great.

This is a matter of personal choice, but on widebody aircraft you will generally find that the front of the Economy cabin is the quietest, normally just in front of the aircraft engines. The rear of the cabin tends to be noisiest from an engine noise perspective, and this also tends to bump around more during turbulence – of course, on less than full flights, you normally find that there are more empty seats at the back of the plane where you can spread out. For the meal services, it is difficult to suggest where you are more likely to be offered the full choice of meals before they run out! Some airlines start meal services from the front of the cabin, some the middle, and a few from the back of the cabin!
Bulkhead seats are are located immediately behind a solid cabin divider (on the PLAN below, Row 30, seats D/E/F/G/H/K). This is normally the location where a Bassinet is provided for families with babies, so can be noisier. Whilst you have no seat reclining in front of you, the legroom may at first seem spacious, but you will find that stretching your legs is not possible like in an ordinary seat. Bulkhead seats also suffer the fact that your tray table will be in the seat armrest, and this be cumbersome when left with a finished meal tray for long periods of time.
Most airlines now charge an additional fee to sit in the exit rows, others will allocate at check-in (remarkably some airlines still favour these seats for much taller passengers!). You do get a lot more legroom in an exit seat, but on the downside there are a few points to remember. You will not be allowed to keep any items of hand-luggage (even books etc sometimes) by your seat/footwell area during landing and take-off periods, and as the bins above your seat may be full by the time you realise, you will have to hope for a cooperative cabin crew that will take these items off you at these periods and return them after take-off and landing!

Also, the exit row seats will not have a PTV entertainment screen on the back of the seat in front (as most seats), but will have the video screen stored in the armrest – similar for the meal tray table which will be stored in your armrest. Because of this design layout, you might find that the actual seat width is less than ordinary seats, and it can be quite cumbersome using the PTV and tray tables – guess it is a case of measuring that against the benefit of extended leg space you will get.
there is no space to keep anything that you may want handy on a flight, like your personal bag with your documents. the seat is tight, felt like I was in a casket in a straight position. small seat, narrow, short, poor support. the crew used the "space" as their holding area for cabin trolleys n people would stand around u waiting for the lavatory. no fun. i'm over 6' tall.
I am 6'5" tall, and these biz class seats are too short for lie-flat seating. Besides being too short, they taper uncomfortably at the feet, which reminds me of squeezing into a test tube or a mummy sleeping bag. For mostly-reclined seating the seat is OK, although the bottom cushion is too thin and I could feel the hard support beneath it. Lack of lumbar support, while true, didn't bother me too much. On the plus side, the light in the foot well is thoughtful, and I found the other lighting more than adequate. A dimmer control for the bright reading light would be good. The storage space for small stuff was very good.

The new business class studio pod is TERRIBLE - narrow, short and ridiculously sized and shaped. It's okay as a seat, but I paid for a good night's sleep. Forget it! I'm 6ft 4 and when the seat turns into a bed, it slides the lower half of your body into a tiny plastic coffin-like box (in the area under the armrests of the two passengers in front) with no room to move your legs at all, and it wasn't long enough for me - so it wasn't humanly possible to lie down!! Hell on earth. As a result, I arrived at LHR tired and irritable, lacking the sleep I had needed and deliberately paid for. The cabin crew was brilliant, but they told me that a lot of other business class passengers had complained about this new seat. It's also difficult to get the seat back up again from a supposed "bed". My seat 2A on C-FIVO was also missing a seat-based flexible reading light. It is a reasonably new aircraft so why on earth was that missing?
You can clearly see this is an attempt to add more per-flight profit just by virtue of increasing the number of seats. Unfortunately, this means a few things for passengers: First Class features fewer seats meaning those seeking a Status upgrade are less likely to be successful. Premium Economy gets you the First Class food, but not the wine & liquor selection - and is only really worth the extra expense if you get seats A, C, H or K ... D, E, F, G are not really worth it in my opinion. The seats are more comfortable (mind you, I'm 5'6" so the overhead bin would be comfortable for me) than Economy, but the middle row still seemed crammed. Economy ... was ... just ... terrible. Even for a shorter guy like me, I was uncomfortable for the duration of the seven hour flight - my heart went out to the guy beside me who was easily over 6'.
Founded in 1937, Air Canada (AC) is Canada's largest airline as well as its flag carrier. It operates from hubs at Calgary International Airport (YYC), Montréal–Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport (YUL), Toronto Pearson International Airport (YYZ) and Vancouver International Airport (YVR). A member of the Star Alliance, Air Canada and its subsidiaries fly to more than 185 destinations in North America, Central America, South America, the Caribbean, Europe, the Middle East, Asia and Australia. It also has codeshare agreements with about 30 other carriers. Its fleet of 175 aircraft consists of one-cabin (Economy Class), two-cabin (Economy Class and either Business Class or Premium Economy Class) and three-cabin (Business Class, Premium Economy Class and Economy Class) configurations.

Seating plans have a wide range of purposes. At formal dinners, they are usually used to avoid chaos and confusion upon entrance and to follow the etiquette. In this case, it is customary to arrange the host and hostess at the opposite sides of the table, and alternate male and female guests throughout.[1] Place cards can be used to direct guests. State dinners have their own protocol and arrangements are made so that the most distinguished guests can have the possibility to engage in conversation. Plans are also made for airplanes, where the objective is to differentiate passengers between the various travel classes and ensure everybody has a place. Similarly, theatres or cinemas may allow spectators to choose their seats beforehand. A seating plan is of crucial importance for musical ensembles or orchestras, where every type of instrument is allocated a specific section.[2]
Air Canada’s fleet, including the fleets of subsidiaries Air Canada Rouge and Air Canada Express, consists of 370 aircraft with 8 Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner, 13 Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner, 19 Boeing B777 300ER, 6 Boeing 777/200LR, 34 Boeing 767-300ER, 8 Airbus A330 300, 20 Airbus A321-200, 38 Airbus A319 100, 42 Airbus A320 200 Domestic, 25 Embraer E190, 20 Embraer E175, 16 Bombardier CRJ705, 30 Bombardier CRJ100/200, 42 Dash8 Q400, 26 Bombardier Dash 8-300, 23 Bombardier Dash 8-100.

You'll often find train formation plans posted in glass cases on station platforms so that you know where on the platform to stand to board your particular car.  These show the train make-up with carriage sequence and carriage numbering for specific train departures, listed by train number. Unfortunately, train operators don't usually provide this information online, but there are a couple of useful private sites that show this information, often with photos of what the cars look like:

Seat is somewhat comfortable and still felt I had enough space when the person in front reclined. However, I would most definitely not like to experience this HD layout (3x4x3) long-haul. I saw passengers of a much bigger build than me, and they were squished like sardines; very little/no room to manoeuvre EXCEPT if you have an aisle seat; one side open for a little extra elbow room/leg room.
Some trains have seats in open-plan saloons, indeed most modern trains have this sort of seating.  Some trains, often older ones and often in eastern Europe, have seats in traditional 6-seater compartments with a side corridor running the length of the car.  There are sliding (but non-lockable) doors to each compartment.  Very occasionally you'll find both sorts of seating on one train, and some booking systems (such as the German Railways site bahn.de or Austrian site oebb.at) will ask you which you prefer.  Unless you're in a group of 5 or 6 people, most travellers prefer open-plan saloon seating, which also gives you a better view out as you can view diagonally forwards and backwards through all the coach windows, not just directly sideways through your own window.
✅ Trip Verified | Flight attendants aren't overly friendly, but they are helpful and attentive, walking up and down the aisles quite often. Aside from the in-flight meal, the cabin crew does come around with drinks and more complimentary snacks quite often. Because Air Canada use a 3x4x3 layout for their 777, seats may feel a bit cramped. This is particularly noticeable when you're trying to have your in-flight meals and you're bumping elbows with your neighbour (the food is good though, even for economy class standards). I consider myself to be average build for someone who is 5'8, and those seats were still reasonably comfortable. I would say however that for the seats on the middle-column, under-seat stowage is odd, since you only get 3 holes for 4 people to put their bags under, which means your neighbour's carry-on may encroach on your legroom. These seats do offer good recline, as the back reclines as the seat cushion slides forward. With the amount of leg room you get, this typically doesn't reduce your legroom dramatically enough to be uncomfortable. Seats are also quite plushy yet offer adequate back support, and the they offer an adjustable leather headrest. You will also find that throughout the flight, the new 777-300ERs feature the Boeing 787 mood-lighting which gradually changes colour throughout the flight. It looks cool and I did rest well on the flight, but there is a relationship between mood lighting and the quality of my rest has yet to be determined.

✅ Trip Verified | We travelled Air Canada from Montreal to LAX yesterday in Business Class. The plane is a new Boeing 737. It seems like Air Canada is following the Rouge tradition by having the most uncomfortable seats imaginable even on a brand new plane. The thickness of the back cushion is very thin and there is a horizontal rod that is placed it seems to cause maximum discomfort. This flight is 6 hours! The foot rests are also extraordinarily cheap and won’t go down unless you get on your knees and manipulate it manually. Also, just like horrible Rouge, the seat posts are positioned so that you cannot store any hand luggage in front of your seat . The middle section has to be shared by seat neighbors. Air Canada used to be our favorite airline and now we have advised our travel agent to research any alternative to Air Canada and Rouge.
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