If you are over 6" and weigh more than 200lbs, you will not fit in economy. Entire layout is designed for 5"11 & under 180lbs. Which is curious because the head room is ~10-11ft - crazy. You can stand comfortably if your 6'8, but can't sit. Another oddity; the overhead bin does not accommondate carry on's that are 1CM over lentgh minimums. Mine is .5CM (measured) over published Air Canada minimums and would not fit in overhead bin, even though on all Airbus, Embraer, Bombardier models the carry on fits fine. Ridiculous. Not sure on other rows, but the touch button control of lights etc. is on the inside of the armrest so rest assured your leg will often trigger lights on/off inadvertantly. Saw others with controls on the armrest itself (top) and heard complaints. If comfort/practicality are important, avoid this model.
If you are over 6" and weigh more than 200lbs, you will not fit in economy. Entire layout is designed for 5"11 & under 180lbs. Which is curious because the head room is ~10-11ft - crazy. You can stand comfortably if your 6'8, but can't sit. Another oddity; the overhead bin does not accommondate carry on's that are 1CM over lentgh minimums. Mine is .5CM (measured) over published Air Canada minimums and would not fit in overhead bin, even though on all Airbus, Embraer, Bombardier models the carry on fits fine. Ridiculous. Not sure on other rows, but the touch button control of lights etc. is on the inside of the armrest so rest assured your leg will often trigger lights on/off inadvertantly. Saw others with controls on the armrest itself (top) and heard complaints. If comfort/practicality are important, avoid this model.
Ensure you get the seat you want with Sunwing Airlines advanced seat selection. Whether you prefer a window seat or an aisle seat, or want to make sure you’re sitting with your family and friends, for just an extra $20 you can secure the seat you want. Pre-book and choose your seat ahead of time to avoid any unnecessary pre-departure stress; just sit back, relax and enjoy Sunwing’s award-winning inflight service.

Some trains have seats in open-plan saloons, indeed most modern trains have this sort of seating.  Some trains, often older ones and often in eastern Europe, have seats in traditional 6-seater compartments with a side corridor running the length of the car.  There are sliding (but non-lockable) doors to each compartment.  Very occasionally you'll find both sorts of seating on one train, and some booking systems (such as the German Railways site bahn.de or Austrian site oebb.at) will ask you which you prefer.  Unless you're in a group of 5 or 6 people, most travellers prefer open-plan saloon seating, which also gives you a better view out as you can view diagonally forwards and backwards through all the coach windows, not just directly sideways through your own window.
Seats are a personal choice. Over the wing you will see less. Behind the wing you will have more noise from the engines. Towards the end you will have less fresh air. Close to the lavatories and galleys you will have more people and noise. At the window you are locked in. At the aile you get more disturbed. At the bulkhead you have more babies. They may run out of food options towards the end of the cabin and so on. The perfect seat for one person is a bad seat for another person. Have a look here and decide for yourself: seatguru.com/airlines/Air_Canada/Air_Canada_…
On the way back from HKG, I paid up and got the Business Class (can't remember the seat#, it was window). While obviously it is a much improved seat versus Econ, the layout, and setup is horrendous for a business class charging thousands. The seat is so uncomfortable in any seating position you try to constantly adjust it, your knee hits the side of the seat, and if you get unlucky and get a window seat, you literally must climb over the passenger next to you to get out, are you kidding me? Further, due to more seats cramped the service is suffered compared to regular 777, 330, or 767.
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Flying these days is often a huge hassle: You have to get to the airport early to make sure you get through security in time, and then there's the issue of the flight itself. One of the biggest issues related to your comfort and a pleasant trip is where you sit: how much legroom the seat has, how wide it is, and how much overhead bin space there is above you for your carry-on luggage. Other considerations include trying to avoid the middle seat in a group of three, getting your preference for a window or an aisle seat, and sitting close to the front of the section so you can deplane more quickly. If you pick a good seat, it makes the whole journey a lot better.
We spend a lot of time getting our seating charts/seat maps right because we know how important they are when deciding which event to attend. When possible, we’ll provide you with photos of actual seat views from different locations in a venue. You can go to our Air Canada Centre seat views page to see them. Air Canada Centre can hold up to 19,800 people but that's a lot of seats and therefore a lot of potential seat views. We wish we had all 19,800 individual seat views for Air Canada Centre but we don't, therefore the seat views we show are usually a sample from different sections in a venue.

✅ Trip Verified | The most uncomfortable long haul flight I have been on. I was seated in row 38, an aisle seat on the Boeing 787-9. I am fairly close to average size (barely 6 feet tall and 185 pounds), so not tiny but neither am I a giant by any means. My knees were just about touching the seat in front of me, the seats are very narrow, and thankfully the passenger seated in the middle seat was not large but he did fill the seat and needed all his elbow room. The seats are very short, offering little or no support to the thighs. This adds to the discomfort, particularly on a long flight. I could not stretch both my legs out fully at all while seated. Trying to use some of the aisle is next to impossible due to the extremely narrow aisles. There is barely room for the refreshment carts to pass. I spent a great deal of time on the flight moving my arm and shoulder inwards as the carts and other passengers were passing and bumping into me and there was no space. Seat backs are very thin and offer no support either. Due to all the factors mentioned, I found sleep to be impossible. The passenger at the window seat managed about an hour's sleep but basically had the same complaint, and needed muscle relaxers for her back towards the end of the flight. Anyone getting out of their seats found it necessary to pull on the seat in front of them for balance and leverage. For relief, I got up to stand and stretch at the rear of the plane 3 times on the eastbound flight and 4 times on the westbound leg. Also, on the outbound flight, our connection was a little late so we went straight to board our London flight without buying snacks, etc. Be warned, we found out on board that in economy you cannot buy snacks. You have to content yourself with the dinner and continental breakfast and I think you get a very small bag of pretzels with a drink. Cabin is beautiful. The in-flight entertainment system was excellent, although some people were asking why wi-fi was not available. The selection of movies, TV programs, and interactive games was OK for me. In summary, I will do everything I possibly can to avoid using this aircraft again. If it even means connecting through another city, I will do it. Three days later, I am still feeling the effects.

By tradition, members of the governing party occupy the seats to the right of the speaker or chair, with the premier and other ministers in the front benches. Occasionally, due to space constraints, members of the governing party may also sit on the left. Members representing opposition parties are seated to the left, with the leader of the official opposition sitting opposite the premier.
✅ Verified Review | I am 5'4" and normal weight. We were in row 30. We found the seats to be extraordinarily uncomfortable; little in the way of cushioning and no lumbar support. The seat pitch was terrible, they are too close together. I was unable to see or reach my belongings with my tray table down. This is particularly bad in the window seat. If you are on the aisle you can pull your belongings out to the side to reach them. If the seat in front of you is reclined it is in your face unless you recline yours too--creating a domino effect behind the first reclinee. We do not like the nickel and dime attitude of charging for seat selection ahead of time. On this flight from Portland OR to Toronto the charge is $45-46 for 'premium economy' (it did not look like seat pitch was noticeably better in these seats in front of the wing), and $21 for regular economy behind the wing. If you don't pay to choose a seat ahead of time, AC assigns you seats 24-hours ahead of flight time. Our seats were assigned by AC. We did get to sit together, but in row 30 out of 33. There is one toilet in economy class on this plane. The inside of the plane looked old and in need of minor repairs to seats and surrounds. Food and drink service was provided once at the beginning of the flight and once toward the end of the flight. Flight attendants were no-where to be seen between those times. (Probably serving in first class). USB ports at each seat, no AC outlet. Small screen on the back of the seat in front of you. A little high for me to comfortably view. But good movie selection. Under-seat storage was good, with no center divider to get in the way. Overhead bins were small, with just enough depth to accommodate a regulation size carry on placed sideways. Although we did get there and back without mishap, it felt like what I imagine it would be like to fly on Spirit Air. We will go out of our way to find an alternative carrier for our next trip to Toronto.
The airline may change the aircraft type before you travel, so the seat numbers you have selected might either change, or not be in the position that you had expected. There are also many instances where the airline’s “system” may decide to re-allocate your chosen seat to another passenger – and you will be left trying to resolve this at airport check in (possibly with no success!)
I flew JFK-KEF last year on DL. It was announced that by the day of my trip it was supposed to be on a flat-bed configuration. Instead it was a recliner, no pre-take-off sparkling as they provisioned for a domestic flight and gave away ear-buds instead of noise cancelling headphones for the same reason. Complained to DL and got 50k points re-deposited for a 125k redemption. I believe that on the longer MSP:KEF route it’s consistently flat-beds.
The aisle seat gives you easy access to walk around, but worth remembering that you might be getting up and down for your fellow passenger seated next to you. The aisle seat positions can also be prone to knocks and bumps as passengers walk past or try to squeeze past service carts in the cabin – you often find out in an aisle seat how inconsiderate some fellow travellers can really be!

This was supposed to be an A330-300, however, the configuration was different than the seat choice map. This seems to be pretty common for Air Canada. The last time I flew this route it was in premium economy, however the premium economy had 4 seats in the middle and the "extra" legroom was not any better or worth the money over regular coach, so thought I would try bulkhead, row 18. I am not sure it was worth the seat cost. The person next to me asked to be moved even though he paid extra for the seat because he had a broken foot and it was more uncomfortable than regular economy where you can put your feet under the seat in front of you. This row perhaps had a bit more space from the back of the seat to the bulkhead, however the extra space for knees does not help your feet, and all bags need to go overhead. Having the seat next to me empty meant I could fold my legs over the tray table armrest that was not movable and stretch out a bit to sleep.


When booking online, a few operators allow you to book a specific seat from a graphic numbered seating plan if you book directly on their own website - such operators include Eurostar at www.eurostar.com (only after payment, using the 'manage a booking' link), German Railways at www.bahn.de (but only for German domestic journeys on German IC or ICE trains), Swedish Railways at www.sj.se, Spanish railways at www.renfe.com (but only for Spanish domestic journeys and only if you buy a Promo+ fare or higher) and a few others.  But these tend to be the exceptions, it's only for their own trains in their own country, and if you buy from a third party site you won't get that functionality, it's only if you book with the operator directly at their own site.  Most other booking sites only let you choose 'aisle' or 'window'.  If you want to book a specific seat on any other train, you'll need to book by phone, preferably with an agency that uses the relevant country's own reservation system.  For example, if you call SNCF or (in the USA or Canada) Rail Europe, these use the French Railways reservation & ticketing system and can easily book a specific seat on a French TGV.  But they can usually only select basic options such as 'aisle' or 'window' when booking a German or Italian or Spanish train.  Conversely, the German Railways UK office obviously uses the German reservation and ticketing system, they can easily book you a specific seat or type of seat on a German ICE, but can only access basic options such as 'aisle' or 'window' on Eurostar or on a French or Italian train.  There's a list of UK booking agencies here, if you really want to book a specific seat then try calling an agency with the most relevant reservation system.
✅ Verified Review | A330 seats are extremely uncomfortable. Airlines need to have a 'use-by' date on seat bottoms as older aircraft have seat bottoms which show a high degree of wear. It would seem a low cost to at least build in better cushioning in seats where the flights are 10 hours or more. Feels like some form of torture to make passengers sit in seats like this. A/V system is also very dated and laggy. Reinvest some of your profits in improved seats and a/V systems. Aisles ridiculously narrow.

Also, the exit row seats will not have a PTV entertainment screen on the back of the seat in front (as most seats), but will have the video screen stored in the armrest – similar for the meal tray table which will be stored in your armrest. Because of this design layout, you might find that the actual seat width is less than ordinary seats, and it can be quite cumbersome using the PTV and tray tables – guess it is a case of measuring that against the benefit of extended leg space you will get.

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