You can check train compositions for domestic and international trains to, from or within the Czech Republic and Slovakia at www.zelpage.cz/razeni.  You can search by train number (enter it in the box at the top) or click on a train category (for example, EuroNight or EuroCity) to see a list of trains.  When you get to the train composition page, click on a carriage for specific carriage information, including a seat or berth numbering plan if they have one.
These planes are configured in two classes of service, with very nice lie-flat sleeper suites in Executive First Class. Pioneered by Virgin Atlantic, the seats are arranged in a herringbone fashion, angled at about 45 degrees to the direction of flight, and might take a little getting used to. Due to the angle of the seats, those that want a view out the window will really have to turn their head. However, every seat is an aisle seat and there is no need to climb over your neighbor or wake them in the middle of the flight.
We flew LHR-YVR on this aircraft and were fortunate to have a whole row of 4 seats between the two of us, allowing us to spread out. If the row had been full, my companion in 61F would have been very squashed as the seats are quite narrow. The in-flight service was much better than I expected it to be - full meal departing LHR, mid-flight snack and ice-cream, then hot snack before arrival in YVR.
✅ Trip Verified | We travelled Air Canada from Montreal to LAX yesterday in Business Class. The plane is a new Boeing 737. It seems like Air Canada is following the Rouge tradition by having the most uncomfortable seats imaginable even on a brand new plane. The thickness of the back cushion is very thin and there is a horizontal rod that is placed it seems to cause maximum discomfort. This flight is 6 hours! The foot rests are also extraordinarily cheap and won’t go down unless you get on your knees and manipulate it manually. Also, just like horrible Rouge, the seat posts are positioned so that you cannot store any hand luggage in front of your seat . The middle section has to be shared by seat neighbors. Air Canada used to be our favorite airline and now we have advised our travel agent to research any alternative to Air Canada and Rouge.
Seat is somewhat comfortable and still felt I had enough space when the person in front reclined. However, I would most definitely not like to experience this HD layout (3x4x3) long-haul. I saw passengers of a much bigger build than me, and they were squished like sardines; very little/no room to manoeuvre EXCEPT if you have an aisle seat; one side open for a little extra elbow room/leg room.
Seating plans have a wide range of purposes. At formal dinners, they are usually used to avoid chaos and confusion upon entrance and to follow the etiquette. In this case, it is customary to arrange the host and hostess at the opposite sides of the table, and alternate male and female guests throughout.[1] Place cards can be used to direct guests. State dinners have their own protocol and arrangements are made so that the most distinguished guests can have the possibility to engage in conversation. Plans are also made for airplanes, where the objective is to differentiate passengers between the various travel classes and ensure everybody has a place. Similarly, theatres or cinemas may allow spectators to choose their seats beforehand. A seating plan is of crucial importance for musical ensembles or orchestras, where every type of instrument is allocated a specific section.[2]
If you are over 6" and weigh more than 200lbs, you will not fit in economy. Entire layout is designed for 5"11 & under 180lbs. Which is curious because the head room is ~10-11ft - crazy. You can stand comfortably if your 6'8, but can't sit. Another oddity; the overhead bin does not accommondate carry on's that are 1CM over lentgh minimums. Mine is .5CM (measured) over published Air Canada minimums and would not fit in overhead bin, even though on all Airbus, Embraer, Bombardier models the carry on fits fine. Ridiculous. Not sure on other rows, but the touch button control of lights etc. is on the inside of the armrest so rest assured your leg will often trigger lights on/off inadvertantly. Saw others with controls on the armrest itself (top) and heard complaints. If comfort/practicality are important, avoid this model.

Some trains have seats in open-plan saloons, indeed most modern trains have this sort of seating.  Some trains, often older ones and often in eastern Europe, have seats in traditional 6-seater compartments with a side corridor running the length of the car.  There are sliding (but non-lockable) doors to each compartment.  Very occasionally you'll find both sorts of seating on one train, and some booking systems (such as the German Railways site bahn.de or Austrian site oebb.at) will ask you which you prefer.  Unless you're in a group of 5 or 6 people, most travellers prefer open-plan saloon seating, which also gives you a better view out as you can view diagonally forwards and backwards through all the coach windows, not just directly sideways through your own window.
  The Singular, Santiago de Chile, is a rare gem. Set in a beautifully preserved historical building, it represents a cross between French Neoclassical design and sleek, modern elegance, with touches of the bohemian. Located in Lastarria, an artistic and charming neighborhood in Santiago, the moment one walks into The Singular, they are affronted with…

Upon payment of the seat selection fee, Air Transat will assign you your requested seat. No refund will be provided should a passenger cancel their seat selection prior to travel. In the event of an aircraft substitution, Air Transat will assign an equivalent seat. If a passenger does not receive an equivalent seat, they will be entitled to a refund of their seat selection fee. To receive a refund, the passenger must submit a copy of their boarding pass, along with their contact information, within 30 days of their return flight. Any request for a refund made after this deadline or without all the required information will not be processed. Air Transat’s liability is limited to refunding the fees associated with seat selection.
Air Canada’s configuration is identical to United’s 737-800s up until the exit row — United also has 16 first class seats, and then nine rows of extra legroom economy seating, including the two exit rows (that’s a lot of preferred seats). However, Air Canada manages to squeeze in an extra three seats in the back behind the exit row, though that seems to be accomplished by putting the bathrooms at the very back, rather than in front of the rear exits. In other words, the galley space will be smaller and cabin will be bigger.
✅ Trip Verified | Boeing 787 seats are extremely uncomfortable. Seat padding is thin and you can feel it on your back. On the other hand seat pitch and width is too tight. Basically this aircraft was designed for 8 abreast but airlines have squeezed 3x3x3 adding an extra seat. Aisles are so narrow that you continuously get bumbled by trolleys/passengers. Avoid this aircraft and try to use Airbus 330/350 if possible, because fuselage is about a foot wider with same number of seats
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there is no space to keep anything that you may want handy on a flight, like your personal bag with your documents. the seat is tight, felt like I was in a casket in a straight position. small seat, narrow, short, poor support. the crew used the "space" as their holding area for cabin trolleys n people would stand around u waiting for the lavatory. no fun. i'm over 6' tall. 

Some trains have seats in open-plan saloons, indeed most modern trains have this sort of seating.  Some trains, often older ones and often in eastern Europe, have seats in traditional 6-seater compartments with a side corridor running the length of the car.  There are sliding (but non-lockable) doors to each compartment.  Very occasionally you'll find both sorts of seating on one train, and some booking systems (such as the German Railways site bahn.de or Austrian site oebb.at) will ask you which you prefer.  Unless you're in a group of 5 or 6 people, most travellers prefer open-plan saloon seating, which also gives you a better view out as you can view diagonally forwards and backwards through all the coach windows, not just directly sideways through your own window.
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Expert Flyer offers free and pro subscriptions. Under free, travelers can use the website to find a better seat by entering their flight information and creating an alert when a more desirable seat becomes available. Under pro, there are basic and premium levels that offer services that include data for more than 400 airlines, detailed seat maps, and the ability to search for awards and upgrades. Users can also download free iOS and Android apps that offer the same service.
Seating plans have a wide range of purposes. At formal dinners, they are usually used to avoid chaos and confusion upon entrance and to follow the etiquette. In this case, it is customary to arrange the host and hostess at the opposite sides of the table, and alternate male and female guests throughout.[1] Place cards can be used to direct guests. State dinners have their own protocol and arrangements are made so that the most distinguished guests can have the possibility to engage in conversation. Plans are also made for airplanes, where the objective is to differentiate passengers between the various travel classes and ensure everybody has a place. Similarly, theatres or cinemas may allow spectators to choose their seats beforehand. A seating plan is of crucial importance for musical ensembles or orchestras, where every type of instrument is allocated a specific section.[2]
Founded in 1937, Air Canada (AC) is Canada's largest airline as well as its flag carrier. It operates from hubs at Calgary International Airport (YYC), Montréal–Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport (YUL), Toronto Pearson International Airport (YYZ) and Vancouver International Airport (YVR). A member of the Star Alliance, Air Canada and its subsidiaries fly to more than 185 destinations in North America, Central America, South America, the Caribbean, Europe, the Middle East, Asia and Australia. It also has codeshare agreements with about 30 other carriers. Its fleet of 175 aircraft consists of one-cabin (Economy Class), two-cabin (Economy Class and either Business Class or Premium Economy Class) and three-cabin (Business Class, Premium Economy Class and Economy Class) configurations.
Bulkhead seats are are located immediately behind a solid cabin divider (on the PLAN below, Row 30, seats D/E/F/G/H/K). This is normally the location where a Bassinet is provided for families with babies, so can be noisier. Whilst you have no seat reclining in front of you, the legroom may at first seem spacious, but you will find that stretching your legs is not possible like in an ordinary seat. Bulkhead seats also suffer the fact that your tray table will be in the seat armrest, and this be cumbersome when left with a finished meal tray for long periods of time.

Some trains have seats in open-plan saloons, indeed most modern trains have this sort of seating.  Some trains, often older ones and often in eastern Europe, have seats in traditional 6-seater compartments with a side corridor running the length of the car.  There are sliding (but non-lockable) doors to each compartment.  Very occasionally you'll find both sorts of seating on one train, and some booking systems (such as the German Railways site bahn.de or Austrian site oebb.at) will ask you which you prefer.  Unless you're in a group of 5 or 6 people, most travellers prefer open-plan saloon seating, which also gives you a better view out as you can view diagonally forwards and backwards through all the coach windows, not just directly sideways through your own window.


While not surprising, Air Canada will sell the forward cabin of these transatlantic flights as business class, even though the seat isn’t really competitive internationally. Pricing seems to be comparable to what you’d pay for a flat bed on a 777 or 787. For example, a roundtrip ticket between Toronto and Shannon will run you ~$2,900. Logically it seems like they should market it as premium economy in terms of the product offering, but I guess they do this because they can get away with it.
Our team were unanimous in selecting seats A or C, H or K in Rows 31-34 on this aircraft. On the plus side, you are at the quietest end of the cabin, will be amongst the first to deplane at destination, and stand a good choice of getting the full choice of meals on offer. Toilets are all to the rear, so no odours or queuing passengers nearby. On the downside, if the bassinet seats in Row 29/30 are full occupied by families with babies, there is a chance of occasional crying etc – so a good noise-cancelling headset would be a must. 
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