Continuing the theme of image-making, let’s work on your communication skills. In the modern era, the ability to charm people is absolutely vital to your future. Why not start practicing right at the check-in counter? Know how to pay compliments and chat to both the check-in personnel and the cabin crew. Words should become your secret power: if you choose them wisely, the reward is guaranteed.

I don’t care how fancy the hotel is, my room has to have a bath. I would absolutely look out on a car park and a wall as long as I could have a bath in my room, rather than a shower. I’ve changed rooms in hotels, taking a smaller one, so I could have a better bath. The best one I’ve ever seen was at the Post Ranch Inn in California. My favorite rooms are built into the cliff, right on the Pacific Ocean; it’s not even a view, because you’re in the view. They have huge, square baths, like a high-end hot tub. You could live in it, it’s so nice. It’s very deep, the water is very hot, and everything smells of lavender, which I love, and there’s a proper wood fire with logs. It feels a bit like classic Twin Peaks. That’s the most beautiful hotel in the world. 


It’s pretty safe to say that all airlines over-book their flights, and when everybody actually shows up for a flight, they need to find people willing to be bumped to a later departure. Consider this a good thing; if the flight is overbooked, your bargaining position is strong. Approach the gate agent and be as genuine and sympathetic as you can. Ask them if they would consider re-booking you in return for an upgrade voucher in addition to whatever other incentives they might be offering (sometimes you can score a free hotel stay and meal voucher if the flight is the next morning). This will be more likely to work if you don’t have checked luggage, which would require much more work on the part of the airlines (and the agent) in order to bump you.
United Airlines - Long-Haul First Class were open suite style flatbed seats and were on all Boeing 747-400, select Boeing 767-300ER, and select Boeing 777-200ER. First Class was named "Global First" (later "Polaris First"). The first class began to be phased out in 2017 as United retired all their 747-400s. United discontinued all first class services by March 2018, although the first class seats remained on select Boeing 767-300ER and select 777-200ER aircraft with them being sold as Polaris Business until they are refurbished with the same Polaris Business class seats featured on the Boeing 777-300ER aircraft.
Emma Hackwood a freelance copywriter, amateur glider pilot and full-time adventure seeker, has travelled extensively in pursuit of her lifelong dream of simply seeing it all. Up to over 50 countries, she lists American Samoa and the seldom visited Marquesas Islands as her current favourite destinations, with a wandering eye on Guam and Tonga to complete her Pacific escapades.
Getting to top levels like 'Gold' or 'Premier' (varies by airline) gives you huge status at check-in, putting you at the front of the queue for any spare expensive seats, and sometimes even equals an upgrade every time one's available. Of course, to get there you need to fly regularly and airlines can make it tricky to accrue points on discounted flights.
If you use various air carriers, you should tie your credit card to a point accumulating program. Such programs as Chase Ultimate Rewards, American Express Membership Rewards, Starwood Preferred Guest and many others enable you to transfer points from different airliners. The credit card options have gainful earning structures even despite the barriers of some air carriers to accumulate miles.
Our lives may be more convenient with the invention of online check-in and airline apps, but have you ever tried to sweet-talk a machine? Although there are countless ways to check in for a flight, none of them are likely to result in an upgrade unless they involve speaking to an actual human being. Arrive at the airport earlier than you need to, and check-in using the airline’s kiosk. You will be able to modify your seat assignment, and if there are any other seats available, you may be able to purchase an upgrade at a significantly reduced cost.
Joe also recounts that Air France emailed him a couple of times on the day of departure offering a cheap (not free) upgrade. “I’ve twice missed this because I didn’t check my emails close enough to departure. One of these times I had even called the airline to ask if they had any deals and they said no! So keep checking your emails even up to a couple of hours before you fly.”

All those people collecting points are not part of some fringe movement of travel lunatics. Other than paying for it, points are the only sure fire way of getting an upgrade, and booking it long enough in advance that you can get excited for your trip for months. Here’s a list of airlines that let you upgrade international plane tickets, and how many points you’ll need. It’s super important to remember that earning points doesn’t require travel. You can earn points from your daily latte spend, amongst many other things. When it comes to using them…
Don’t get me wrong — when I am filing past the first few rows of seats on my way to the back of the plane, those big leather seats with folks already drinking wine in them have a strong allure. But those seats come with a cost, whether in cash or in miles, and on domestic flights you don’t get all that much more than the folks in coach — it’s usually the same meals, albeit for “free,” the same headphones with the same movies or DirecTV, and the same limited seat incline.

Today, with profits essentially non-existent, airlines are oftentimes not releasing Premium seating for flight upgrades until an hour (or even minutes) before the flight's departure, hoping to sell those seats at full cash value. Only at this point do the airlines release the empty (non-purchased) Premium seats to their frequent flyers who use miles to get the award or the flight upgrade. So it becomes a race among frequent travelers to position themselves to obtain one of the coveted few Premium seats. And everyone you speak with seems to have their own method and strategy for getting into position to take advantage of these hard to come by flight upgrades.
The promo code is applicable on flight bookings. The promo code needs to be applied while checking out. The displayed promo code offers discounts on our service fees. A maximum of $40 per person can be saved by using this promo code; at least 4 passengers are needed to redeem the full value. This promo code cannot be used or combined with any other promo code, promotion or special offer. This promo code will be applicable based on the route searched, selected cabin type and other associated factors. The promo code can be withdrawn anytime without any prior notice. The promo code can only be applied once by a single customer.
And if you’re nice to the agent at the check-in, it paves the road for an inquiry. As the adage goes, it never hurts to ask; a polite request for an upgrade if there’s a seat available, may actually result in a one-way trip to business class. Especially if you have a compelling reason, like you’re super tall, pregnant or celebrating a milestone event. 

7. Give up your spot. When the gate agent asks for people who are willing to give up their seat, volunteer if you can be upgraded on the next flight. You will experience the delay, but it might be worth it if you can fly first class. This works especially well if there aren't other people volunteering, Jeanenne Tornatore, senior editor at travel website Orbitz.com, told Market Watch.
“You can get earned and courtesy upgrades if you’re an elite frequent flyer, but an ordinary person, turning up at the check-in podium at the gate, and hoping to get upgraded — those days have departed,” says David Rowell, founder of The Travel Insider. “The computerized customer relationship software that all airlines have these days lists every passenger on every flight in terms of upgrade priority, and no matter where you are on that list, you’re not going to get an upgrade until everyone above you on the list has been given upgrades first.”
I love the winter scent, by the White Company, which is literally the smell of Christmas for me—and I’m obsessed with Christmas. But it doesn’t come in small bottles or anything you can really decant. So I have the room spray, and I spray it on absolutely everything: my cashmere scarf, full of holes, that I travel with, always; the inside of my suitcase; any piece of hand luggage; inside my shoes; my socks. I go to town with it. If I am going to die in a twisted, white hot, melting fuselage at 30,000 feet, I want to do it smelling of cinnamon and cloves. I want to do it festively. 
Air transport agreement Bermuda Agreement (UK-US, 1946-78) Bermuda II Agreement (UK-US, 1978-2008) China-US Cross-Strait charter (China-Taiwan) Beijing Convention Cape Town Treaty Chicago Convention Convention on the Marking of Plastic Explosives European Common Aviation Area Flight permit Freedoms of the air Hague Hijacking Convention Hague Protocol ICAO Montreal Convention Open skies (EU–US Open Skies Agreement) Paris Convention of 1919 Rome Convention Sabotage Convention Tokyo Convention Warsaw Convention
First-class seats vary from large reclining seats with more legroom and width than other classes to suites with a fully reclining seat, workstation and TV surrounded by privacy dividers. International first-class seats usually have 147–239 cm (58–94 inches) of seat pitch and 48–89 cm (19–35 inches) of width while domestic flights may have 86–173 cm (34–68 inches) of pitch and 46–56 cm (18–22 inches) in width. In fact this means there is less discomfort for taller people. Some airlines have first-class seats which allow passengers to let one guest sit for a short while face-to-face with the occupant of the cabin.
US Airways – International First Class consisted of six flatbed suites in the first row on the Airbus A330-300. International First Class was eliminated as a separate class of service in 2002, although the seats remained until the A330-300 fleet was refurbished any Envoy passenger could reserve an "Envoy Sleeper" seat in the first row for a small fee at booking, or for free at check-in if seats were available – ground service, on-board service, catering and entertainment were identical to Envoy.

Just be nice is my advice. So many people are so nasty to the agents at the desks and to the flight attendants. It’s not their fault the flight is delayed due to weather, that’s the hazards of flying in the winter. Mother Nature is unpredictable. Plan for the worst and hope for the best but always be nice. I used to travel with a friend that worked for an airline. Her advice was be nice and go with the flow. Only take a carry on bag because it is much easier to change flights and accommodate you and your fellow companions. Always say please and thank you to the agents and attendants, you just might make their day a little brighter in this crazy go go go world. 
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