But Matrix can show you the discounted fares too (as many frequent fliers and travel hackers know). Matrix, as we've mentioned before, is the Google-owned software that powers the most popular travel search engines, as well as many airlines and travel agents' tools. To find the discounted fares, all you have to do is choose "Business class or higher" in the search box. The Y-Up fares are rolled into the search results and show the seats as first class.
First-class seats vary from large reclining seats with more legroom and width than other classes to suites with a fully reclining seat, workstation and TV surrounded by privacy dividers. International first-class seats usually have 147–239 cm (58–94 inches) of seat pitch and 48–89 cm (19–35 inches) of width while domestic flights may have 86–173 cm (34–68 inches) of pitch and 46–56 cm (18–22 inches) in width. In fact this means there is less discomfort for taller people. Some airlines have first-class seats which allow passengers to let one guest sit for a short while face-to-face with the occupant of the cabin.
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Why you want to fly it: Similar to those at Emirates, Singapore Airlines’ first class improvements include all-new suites with closing doors on the upper deck of its flagship Airbus A380 jumbo jets, which are currently flying from Singapore to Sydney, Hong Kong, Zurich, Shanghai, and London Heathrow. (The cabins are being installed on new A380s first, then retrofitted onto existing A380s over the next few years.) The distinguishing features? Swiveling Poltrona Frau leather armchairs that recline to 135 degrees, plus separate, stowable beds that are made up with Lalique linens. You can also turn adjacent suites into a huge one if you’re traveling with a companion, and get primped up for landing in an enormous lavatory with a sit-down vanity counter.
During the 1980s European first class was largely phased out in favour of 6-abreast seating throughout the aircraft, with variable numbers of seats allocated to business class (the business class cabin often being marked with a moveable divider).[4] This allowed greater flexibility for the airlines, allowing them to allocate differing amounts of premium seating depending on the route. Turkish Airlines are one of the few European airlines still offering 4-abreast seating in their premium intra-Europe cabins, but they're sold as business class seats rather than first class.[7] Same situation is in Russia onboard Aeroflot – Russian Airlines intra-Europe flights.
Another benefit of flying First Class is access to exclusive airline lounges. Most major airlines have a collection of lounges throughout the world, and most also have a network of partner airline lounges you can access if flying First Class. Common features of airline lounges include WiFi, restaurant quality meal and beverages, televisions, reading material, showers and computers. Refer to your airline for more information on the lounges offered.
Expect to see a clashing of the cultures in Hong Kong where tradition meets vogue, harmoniously weaving together. This results in a city which has a thriving cosmopolitan centre nestled within an area which is steeped in history. As a former British colony which was then handed back to China in 1997, you can see the influences of both cultures, creating its own, unique blend.

Business Class deals aren't what they used to be. That's right, at Flight Centre Canada, they're the best they've ever been! Our unbeatable Business Class flights not only put you in the lap of luxury, they're some of the most competitive in the industry. While cheap Business Class tickets may seem counterintuitive, they're not unheard of. Our standing in the industry and access to contracted rates provides us with exclusive Business Class discounts, often resulting in pricing comparable to Premium Economy fares.


As the airlines have cut the number of seats they sell and make it harder for everyone but their very best customers to get upgrades to premium cabins, it's a lot harder to make the leap -- but not completely impossible. It can happen with a mix of luck, frequent flyer status, higher-priced tickets that are easier to upgrade, or a need to accommodate other passengers. Any of these factors can change on any given day or even a flight. So below are 10 tips that may help boost your odds of getting into the premium economy, business, or first class.

Kindness pays, so pay it forward with interest and you could be in first class in the blink of a smile. Andrew Phillips, Senior Technical Manager, recounts his lucky American flight upgrade: “Flying to the US a few years ago, I boarded the plane late (as usual) and there was an old chap sitting down in my seat. The stewardess (who I’d chatted to on the way in) was nearby and heard the guy saying he just wanted to sit next to his wife. I told her I didn’t mind sitting in his seat (it was the row behind I think) and off she went, only to return five minutes later. She asked me to follow her…all the way up to business class!”
How to book it for less than coach: The only miles currency that Singapore Airlines accepts for first-class bookings is its own KrisFlyer miles—a transfer partner of American Express Membership Rewards, Chase Ultimate Rewards, and Citi ThankYou Rewards. Even a new KrisFlyer member can score the 75,000 miles it takes to fly one-way in a suite from Singapore to Sydney by rolling over the same number of points from one of these partner programs.
2. Remain Loyal. Airline loyalty programs aren't what they used to be. Even if you’re a frequent traveler, the perks you receive aren't nearly what they once were. All the same, those miles will add up and eventually you can use them for a free upgrade. But watch the expiration dates and make sure to read all e-mails that come from the airline. Don’t let points expire.
Opt to take a flight during a less popular time, and even if you don’t secure an upgrade, you may be lucky enough to have empty seats beside you in economy. Many airlines over-subscribe flights, leaving midweek mornings and weekend evenings the best times to land an upgrade. Also consider flying on bank holidays as there tend to be less business class passengers travelling during that time.
Many airlines allow upgrade auctions, and sometimes they can actually offer some bargain gems which will get you business class for less. Systems like PlusGrade allow you to enter your booking details and bid for an upgrade using cash. It’s important to remember what’s “worth it” and more importantly, what’s not – but sometimes if you get a fantastic economy deal, it can make perfect sense to spend a bit and win an upgrade auction to business class. Flat beds are really nice, after all. Before you book, check if your airline offers upgrade auctions, and take it from there… 

United Airlines - Long-Haul First Class were open suite style flatbed seats and were on all Boeing 747-400, select Boeing 767-300ER, and select Boeing 777-200ER. First Class was named "Global First" (later "Polaris First"). The first class began to be phased out in 2017 as United retired all their 747-400s. United discontinued all first class services by March 2018, although the first class seats remained on select Boeing 767-300ER and select 777-200ER aircraft with them being sold as Polaris Business until they are refurbished with the same Polaris Business class seats featured on the Boeing 777-300ER aircraft.
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Sure, added benefits like amenity kits, pyjamas, china crockery, fine wine and starched linen serviettes are lovely. The real difference, however, between travelling in the front or the back of the plane is your arrival condition. Business class passengers step from the plane refreshed, relaxed, their clothes crisp and prim, hair and makeup immaculate.

The way you look should tell anybody that you’re eligible for traveling first class. So manage to dress sharp and groom yourself properly. Since most people aren’t really concerned about how they look during long trips, a classy dressed traveler instantly draws the attention of people responsible for premium class sales. Wear business casual, act your best, and see the effect!

How to book it for less than coach: Good news for U.S.-based fliers: Cathay is a member of the Oneworld airline alliance, along with American Airlines Inc., so you can use AAdvantage miles for award tickets on the Asian carrier. That costs 110,000 miles each way from the airline’s hub in Hong Kong to the continental U.S., or 90,000 miles each way between Hong Kong and Europe. Have Alaska Airlines miles? You’re in even better luck. It costs only 70,000 Alaska miles for a one-way, first-class ticket between Asia and the U.S. or Europe. Pro tip: Cathay often opens up award seats at the last minute, so spontaneous travelers can be handsomely rewarded.
Certainly it wasn’t all chance that brought first-class upgrades floating one’s way, and a heavy battery of hard and soft tactics arose to increase your chances. Dress neatly, speak politely, fly the same airline regularly, inquire when offering your frequent flier number to the telephone booking person, stand a little taller at check-in if you can (for the tall-person sympathy upgrade), volunteer to give up your economy seat so a family might sit together, volunteer to be bumped on an overbooked flight.
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