Sure, added benefits like amenity kits, pyjamas, china crockery, fine wine and starched linen serviettes are lovely. The real difference, however, between travelling in the front or the back of the plane is your arrival condition. Business class passengers step from the plane refreshed, relaxed, their clothes crisp and prim, hair and makeup immaculate.

First class is a travel class on some passenger airliners intended to be more luxurious than business class, premium economy, and economy class. On a passenger jetliner, first class usually refers to a limited number (rarely more than 20) of seats or cabins toward the front of the aircraft which have more space, comfort, service, and privacy. In general, first class is the highest class offered, although some airlines have branded their new products as above first class. Propeller airliners often had first class in the rear, away from the noise of the rotating propeller, while first class on jet aircraft is normally positioned near the front of the aircraft, normally in front of the business class section, or on the top deck for aircraft such as the Boeing 747 and Airbus A380.


While flying first class introduces you to the glamorous side of traveling, forget about playing the lotto in order to cover the cost of airfare. At Expedia.com, it’s more affordable than ever to fly in the fancy section, because we offer all kinds of cheap first class tickets for both long and short flights. You deserve the utmost comfort during your flight, so browse through our selection of the cheapest first class tickets to find one that matches your price range and itinerary. Once you find the perfect airfare, it’s time to get into vacation mode—pack up your belongings, stretch out in your luxury seat, and toast to the finer things ahead.
We use cookies to improve your user experience. Cookies are small text files that are saved in your browser. Some cookies are always on, as they are necessary for the website to work properly. Depending on your preferences, we will also use cookies for analytical purposes and to offer you personalised content and relevant advertising. You can change your preferences for these cookies at any time.
*Lowest Fare Guarantee - We are so sure that our bulk private fares are unbeatable that we will give you a Low Fare Guarantee! As long as you call us within 24 hours from the purchase of your ticket and you provide us with a copy of the itinerary from any of our competitors which will include identical itinerary, including the fare basis and fare calculation information, we will match the price and send you $50 voucher to use towards your next purchase of any bulk private fares. 

First class seats are typically offered to passengers who somehow distinguish from regular flyers. So if you have some title, why not use it instead of flying economy over and over again? As a rule, holders of diplomatic passports, as well as officials and doctors, get free upgrades quite easily. If you don’t have any document confirming your special status, perhaps some of your family members have it?
However, domestic first class does have two very different meanings on certain transcontinental routes between New York City and California. Delta Airlines, American Airlines, United Airlines, and JetBlue operate a special service on flights between John F. Kennedy International Airport and San Francisco International Airport or Los Angeles International Airport known as "Delta Transcontinental Service," "American flagship service", "United p.s." (p.s. stands for premium service), and "Mint," respectively, with Delta and United using specially configured Boeing 757-200s and American and JetBlue using Airbus A321s. In the cases of American and JetBlue, first class is actually a three-cabin first class which is different from two-cabin first class, both in comfort and price (such as lie flat seats in first class, for example). In these cases, domestic business class is generally slightly higher than a two-cabin domestic first class ticket. The three-cabin first class is more of a true first class rather than a rebranded business class. On JetBlue however, first class is only offered on transcontinental flights, consisting of mini suites or lie-flat seats.

Be late without reserving your seat: if you’re lucky and if the flight is overbooked, you might just be able to bag a premium class ticket. However, Joe Sarre, Senior Product Manager in APAC says it “works well at busy times, but it’s a dangerous game! If you’re too late you might miss the check-in time, or they might have already sorted their overbooking problems by giving upgrades to the passengers ahead.” Love flying by the seat of your pants? Check out our top tips for bagging a last-minute holiday.

Another tactic to make a check-in agent to provide you with a first class seat is to awaken his/her sympathy by using your acting skills. Tears of desperation have a huge power when those are squeezed out in the right way. Even if you overact and irritate everyone around, the check-in staff may agree to upgrade you for free just in order to isolate you from the rest of passengers. 

True first class only exists on premium commercial routes, so beware as a few airlines call their business class "first". It means the crème de la crème of comfort, both on the plane and at the airport. Often the seat can be replaced by a full bed with bedding. Massages may also be available, as well as the highest quality of personal concierge service.
Just be nice is my advice. So many people are so nasty to the agents at the desks and to the flight attendants. It’s not their fault the flight is delayed due to weather, that’s the hazards of flying in the winter. Mother Nature is unpredictable. Plan for the worst and hope for the best but always be nice. I used to travel with a friend that worked for an airline. Her advice was be nice and go with the flow. Only take a carry on bag because it is much easier to change flights and accommodate you and your fellow companions. Always say please and thank you to the agents and attendants, you just might make their day a little brighter in this crazy go go go world.
Opt to take a flight during a less popular time, and even if you don’t secure an upgrade, you may be lucky enough to have empty seats beside you in economy. Many airlines over-subscribe flights, leaving midweek mornings and weekend evenings the best times to land an upgrade. Also consider flying on bank holidays as there tend to be less business class passengers travelling during that time.
United Airlines - Long-Haul First Class were open suite style flatbed seats and were on all Boeing 747-400, select Boeing 767-300ER, and select Boeing 777-200ER. First Class was named "Global First" (later "Polaris First"). The first class began to be phased out in 2017 as United retired all their 747-400s. United discontinued all first class services by March 2018, although the first class seats remained on select Boeing 767-300ER and select 777-200ER aircraft with them being sold as Polaris Business until they are refurbished with the same Polaris Business class seats featured on the Boeing 777-300ER aircraft.
Continuing the theme of image-making, let’s work on your communication skills. In the modern era, the ability to charm people is absolutely vital to your future. Why not start practicing right at the check-in counter? Know how to pay compliments and chat to both the check-in personnel and the cabin crew. Words should become your secret power: if you choose them wisely, the reward is guaranteed.
We have never bought an upper-class seat; if ever we’ve flown anywhere up front, we’ve used miles to upgrade from economy. If you want to do that, call reservations and drop the name “revenue management.” The reason is that revenue management’s job is to make sure a flight is profitable, so they’re the ones telling [reservation agents] what they can say; they’re like Flying Club’s boss. Not everyone knows that this department exists, and by mentioning it you reveal yourself as someone who knows how things work and understands how seats are released. Say to the agent: ‘Have revenue management released any first-class seats for miles upgrades yet?’ When they say no, ask them to check or just be put through to revenue management so you can ask when they will release some, as well as how many seats are left. Politely respond like this: ‘You have 20 seats unsold?  Why aren’t you releasing them?’ Often by the end of the conversation they say, ‘OK, we’ll release one for you,’ or they might tell you to call back tomorrow. Doing that, we’ve had a pretty much 100 percent success rate.
If you’ve already booked an Econo or EconoFlex fare and are looking to upgrade to Premium, then you may be in luck. You can choose to upgrade to Premium for a fee at check-in, if seats in Premium are still available. For your flight you will enjoy priority boarding, extra leg and elbow room and on-board food and beverages (including beer, wine and spirits).1,2,3,4
And it is not just a combination of luck and automation that will shut you out of upgrades — at some airlines, it may be a matter of policy. “Most airlines state, in no uncertain terms, that their policies prohibit arbitrary upgrading, both at check-in and onboard,” says Randy Petersen of InsideFlyer. “It’s a firm rule, with no room for negotiation or interpretation.” Petersen agrees about the root cause: “This becomes understandable when you consider that upgrading is now often done electronically, rather than by queuing up at the check-in counter.”
Over the past years, first class travel has been undergoing unprecedented improvements, as more airlines upgrade their “upper decks” to meet the growing expectations of the most discerning fryers. At the same time, a growing number of carriers choose aggressive pricing strategies, offering volume discounts and wholesale first class airfares through select consolidators with results-proven distribution channels.
Airlines reward their elite and frequently flying customers as those bring them increased revenue. So when it comes to cheap first class flights, these passengers are on the top of standby lists. To become one of them, you can simply join frequent flyer programs offered by all airlines. Strictly speaking, “true” elite clients get their premium seats in any case. However, you have all the opportunities to achieve that status with time. By the way, it works more effectively when you constantly earn points from a particular airline of your choice.
×