Short of searching day by day (either on their site, or on Expert Flyer which looks pretty good, thanks) do you have any tips for searching VA international business class? I want a return to LAX any time next year, don't mind when, with 10-14 days over there. I few sample dates pulled up nothing, whether short notice, 6 months away or 10 months away...

Finding airline award space, especially in premium classes, can be an art form (and a challenging one at that). There are so many partnerships both within and across airline alliances, and some websites and phone agents are better at finding available seats than others. That being said, knowledge is power in the world of points and miles, and that’s exactly what ExpertFlyer provides. By allowing you to search award space and set alerts for your perfect itinerary, the platform equips you with the trip planning expertise you need with minimal effort on your part. Hopefully this guide has shown you exactly how to unleash the tool’s power as you plot your next redemption.


Here’s where the power of ExpertFlyer comes into play. Let’s say that I wasn’t interested in crossing the Atlantic in economy. Instead of coming back to the site multiple times in the weeks and days leading up to my desired flight, I can actually set up a flight alert by clicking on the exclamation point icon (red arrow in the above screenshot). That would open up a window like this: 

Delhi To Mumbai FlightsLowest Fare Rs. 2624 , 18 Feb 2019 Mumbai To Delhi FlightsLowest Fare Rs. 2421 , 04 Mar 2019 Delhi To Bengaluru FlightsLowest Fare Rs. 3062 , 12 Mar 2019 Bengaluru To Delhi FlightsLowest Fare Rs. 3031 , 22 Jan 2019 Kolkata To Delhi FlightsLowest Fare Rs. 2700 , 25 Feb 2019 Delhi To Chennai FlightsLowest Fare Rs. 3044 , 19 Feb 2019 Mumbai To Bengaluru FlightsLowest Fare Rs. 1683 , 13 Feb 2019 Ahmedabad To Delhi FlightsLowest Fare Rs. 1832 , 04 Mar 2019 Delhi To Srinagar FlightsLowest Fare Rs. 2626 , 16 Jan 2019 Hyderabad To Bengaluru FlightsLowest Fare Rs. 1484 , 14 Jan 2019
I’ve included these two together in this instance as the startup team behind Yapta jumped on board with KAYAK back in February of 2010, and the two websites share a crossover of features and a similar design. The combination of Yapta and KAYAK probably offers the most powerful combination of features for tracking flight costs, but it can be a touch finicky to use and is not as intuitive as Google Flights.
In addition to setting alerts for all the trips you know you want to take, travelers should be prepared to book spontaneous flights, too. Like the DealRay app, Thrifty Traveler and Scott’s Cheap Flights are subscription services that will notify you when there’s a serious deal worth booking — even if the destination hadn’t been on your radar at all. Instead of a push notification, however, they send e-mail blasts to subscribers. 

Airline computer booking systems have become so sophisticated that most upgrades are doled out based on a complex brew of data, and it’s now much more likely that a computer (rather than a helpful airline agent) decides if you get an upgrade or if you are stuck in a middle seat in the back of the plane. This article includes a couple of interesting graphics on how Delta and United assess upgrade eligibility.
Airfarewatchdog.com: This is the only site in the group that lists and compares fares on Southwest Airlines (now the largest domestic carrier based on passengers boarded, but one that refuses to pay sites to send it traffic), as well as those on low cost carriers such as Allegiant and Skybus, which sell fares only on their own Web sites. Whereas the other sites listed here use computer programs to evaluate fares, Airfarewatchdog uses people, who actually test if seats are available at the fares listed (sometimes airlines file fares for which very few or no seats at all are available, which is very naughty of them).
Try a smile and a nice word or two when hoping to upgrade, Carolyn Paddock, owner of Inflight Insider, told Bankrate. From the second you enter the airport, be friendly. You’re not sure who will ultimately make the decision about your upgrade. And frequent fliers may have an even bigger advantage. If someone at the airport recognizes you and remembers how friendly you are, it could greatly increase your chances. So whether it’s an early morning or a late night, smile.
You’re tired of economy class. Instead, you want to spend your flight relaxing in first class, soaking up the spacious seats and good food. While there are always going to be situations when first class is full and you’re just out of luck, there are also going to be plenty of opportunities to try to work your way to the front of the plane. Most of the time, the little things that go a long way.
I like Skyscanner.com because it has the open-ended “everywhere” option. You just type in your departure city (or general area such as your state) and in the destination box, you can select “everywhere.” What I don’t like about this option that it will only populate for departures from major cities. When I type in my airport, I have to click on each destination to get prices, a bit labor intensive. It does offer a nice map view of the entire world populated with the lowest-priced fares from any departure city. You can easily set up an alert for any combination of cities but not to “everywhere.”
Charge for a change to the flight date up to 30 minutes before departure before web check-in closes RBK €70 / £61 / CHF 81 / $82 / CZK 1,800 / SEK 717 / NOK 667 / PLN 301 / HUF 22,332 (plus difference in current flight price) €90 / £79 / CHF 104 / $105 / CZK 2,314 / SEK 922 / NOK 858 / PLN 387 / HUF 28,712 / AED 424 / THB 3,700 (plus difference in current flight price)
Setting up airfare alerts can definitely help save you money when booking flights, and luckily there are dozens of sites that offer such a service — but finding one that fits your preferences can be challenging. Here are ten sites that offer alerts to help you determine the right time to buy your tickets, alert you to new deals you might want to consider, allow tracking of a specific flight, and some that will even forecast price trends.
One of the coolest features about Kiwi is that unlike it will look at ALL the cheapest possibilities, even if it means putting you on 2 totally separate flights. Other flight search engines will try to book the entire route on either the same airline or airlines with codeshares. It might not always be the fastest or more convenient, but great for anyone on a budget.
Here’s where the power of ExpertFlyer comes into play. Let’s say that I wasn’t interested in crossing the Atlantic in economy. Instead of coming back to the site multiple times in the weeks and days leading up to my desired flight, I can actually set up a flight alert by clicking on the exclamation point icon (red arrow in the above screenshot). That would open up a window like this:
Farecast.com: This site is best known for predicting where an airfare on a particular route is going to go (up, down, or stay the same) over a period of time. But recently it, too, got into the fare listing game. From the home page, go to the "Airline Ticket Deals" section and you'll see a select, but not very extensive, list of fares from the airport of your choice. Unlike Farecompare, Farecast uses airfare data from Cambridge, MA-based ITA Software, which in our experience is more accurate than ATPCO's data. Farecast's fares show all taxes up front, but Southwest, Allegiant, Skybus and a few other airlines' fares are not shown.
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Sites in this latter category, which is growing at a rapid clip, may include a search component, but they also provide a list of low fares and/or alerts about such fares, either delivered by e-mail or posted online. They're ideal for people who are just looking for somewhere cheap to visit, or who are hoping to travel on specific routes but want to buy when fares are at their lowest. In alphabetical order, here are 10 of the best.
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