Be reasonable. Being overly demanding or demeaning just inspires agents to pick someone else to upgrade if the opportunity arises. And don’t waste everyone’s time and good will if you know that you are a poor candidate. If you are traveling with your whole family, have a pet lobster in a cage as your carry-on or purchased a ticket for an extremely low fare, you probably don’t want to spend your energy demanding upgrades.

Certainly it wasn’t all chance that brought first-class upgrades floating one’s way, and a heavy battery of hard and soft tactics arose to increase your chances. Dress neatly, speak politely, fly the same airline regularly, inquire when offering your frequent flier number to the telephone booking person, stand a little taller at check-in if you can (for the tall-person sympathy upgrade), volunteer to give up your economy seat so a family might sit together, volunteer to be bumped on an overbooked flight.
Travelocity.com: Travelocity, as far as we know, was the first travel agency site to offer a fare watch system. Once upon a time, it tracked both international and domestic fares, but now only covers domestic/Canadian deals. To use it, go to the "Flights" tab and then to "Low Fare Alert" and then click on "Get email alerts" in the upper righthand corner under "Tools". You can sign up for alerts on up to five routes. On the Low Fare Alert page you'll also see a list of fares, from any given city, that have gone down in price from the previous day. Travelocity searches fares just once a day, however, compared to Farecompare's three times a day Monday-Friday.
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Which, if any, of these sites allow you to say “please add the cost of extra legroom seats” on airlines A, B, and C but not on airlines X, Y, and Z, as you set up a fare alert? (On certain airlines, I get access to exit rows or extra legroom seats for free, while on other airlines I have to pay for that access. And as a tall person, that’s important to me. But that means the price without that added is irrelevant to me on those airlines where I would have to pay extra for the “decent” seat.) 

Be reasonable. Being overly demanding or demeaning just inspires agents to pick someone else to upgrade if the opportunity arises. And don’t waste everyone’s time and good will if you know that you are a poor candidate. If you are traveling with your whole family, have a pet lobster in a cage as your carry-on or purchased a ticket for an extremely low fare, you probably don’t want to spend your energy demanding upgrades.
Certainly it wasn’t all chance that brought first-class upgrades floating one’s way, and a heavy battery of hard and soft tactics arose to increase your chances. Dress neatly, speak politely, fly the same airline regularly, inquire when offering your frequent flier number to the telephone booking person, stand a little taller at check-in if you can (for the tall-person sympathy upgrade), volunteer to give up your economy seat so a family might sit together, volunteer to be bumped on an overbooked flight.
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