I like Skyscanner.com because it has the open-ended “everywhere” option. You just type in your departure city (or general area such as your state) and in the destination box, you can select “everywhere.” What I don’t like about this option that it will only populate for departures from major cities. When I type in my airport, I have to click on each destination to get prices, a bit labor intensive. It does offer a nice map view of the entire world populated with the lowest-priced fares from any departure city. You can easily set up an alert for any combination of cities but not to “everywhere.”
At Iwantthatflight.com, setting up an airfare alert is easy. Just conduct a search for your specific destinations and dates and once the flights and fares for that search are displayed, insert your email, submit, and you will receive fare alerts that match your selections. You can also specify the price at which you’d like to be notified. For instance, if you want to be alerted when the price for the flights drops below $700, you would type “$700” into the request box versus the current price which is the default amount. What I like about the site is that you can track a specific flight but I don’t like that it doesn’t give you more options such as different dates. You’ll have to set up a separate alert for each set of dates. Also, it is an Australian website so prices are shown in Australian dollars. It is not a booking site however so you’ll be directed to the appropriate airline or agency site offering your chosen fare.
Be reasonable. Being overly demanding or demeaning just inspires agents to pick someone else to upgrade if the opportunity arises. And don’t waste everyone’s time and good will if you know that you are a poor candidate. If you are traveling with your whole family, have a pet lobster in a cage as your carry-on or purchased a ticket for an extremely low fare, you probably don’t want to spend your energy demanding upgrades.
Number 2 is that you don’t even need to know where you want to go. Based solely on your fixed dates or a broad time period, the Explore option shows you where is cheapest to fly, which is a perfect tool for the early stages of your trips. I use it this feature a lot when planning a trip itinerary or choosing which hub city should I adopt in a multi-city trip.
Short of searching day by day (either on their site, or on Expert Flyer which looks pretty good, thanks) do you have any tips for searching VA international business class? I want a return to LAX any time next year, don't mind when, with 10-14 days over there. I few sample dates pulled up nothing, whether short notice, 6 months away or 10 months away...

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I like Skyscanner.com because it has the open-ended “everywhere” option. You just type in your departure city (or general area such as your state) and in the destination box, you can select “everywhere.” What I don’t like about this option that it will only populate for departures from major cities. When I type in my airport, I have to click on each destination to get prices, a bit labor intensive. It does offer a nice map view of the entire world populated with the lowest-priced fares from any departure city. You can easily set up an alert for any combination of cities but not to “everywhere.”

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At Iwantthatflight.com, setting up an airfare alert is easy. Just conduct a search for your specific destinations and dates and once the flights and fares for that search are displayed, insert your email, submit, and you will receive fare alerts that match your selections. You can also specify the price at which you’d like to be notified. For instance, if you want to be alerted when the price for the flights drops below $700, you would type “$700” into the request box versus the current price which is the default amount. What I like about the site is that you can track a specific flight but I don’t like that it doesn’t give you more options such as different dates. You’ll have to set up a separate alert for each set of dates. Also, it is an Australian website so prices are shown in Australian dollars. It is not a booking site however so you’ll be directed to the appropriate airline or agency site offering your chosen fare.

For eligible customers travelling on International flights with a Latitude (booking classes Y and B) or Premium Economy Flexible (booking class O) fare, upgrades are based on the availability of “P” booking class at time of request. For eligible customers travelling on North American and Caribbean flights with a Latitude (booking class Y, B) or Premium Economy Flexible fare (booking class O) fare, upgrades are based on the availability of “Z” booking class at time of request.
Sites in this latter category, which is growing at a rapid clip, may include a search component, but they also provide a list of low fares and/or alerts about such fares, either delivered by e-mail or posted online. They're ideal for people who are just looking for somewhere cheap to visit, or who are hoping to travel on specific routes but want to buy when fares are at their lowest. In alphabetical order, here are 10 of the best.
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You will be notified every time the price changes so you can best keep track. As there is no standard for how often airfare changes, there is no maximum or minimum number of times that you will be notified. Our goal is to keep you up to date and help ensure that you get the best deal available and the best way to do this is to notify you every time there is a price increase or decrease.

Number 2 is that you don’t even need to know where you want to go. Based solely on your fixed dates or a broad time period, the Explore option shows you where is cheapest to fly, which is a perfect tool for the early stages of your trips. I use it this feature a lot when planning a trip itinerary or choosing which hub city should I adopt in a multi-city trip.
Kiwi’s interactive map feature is especially useful. Set your home city and look at the map to see how much different cities would cost to fly to. Once you select your destination, you can sort your results into either recommended, cheapest or shortest flight. Kiwi finds the cheapest pricing by pulling in different carriers, but you may have to book separate tickets — which shouldn’t be a problem for bargain hunters or those on a budget. For example, if you want to fly from New York (JFK) to Dublin (DUB), you could always fly nonstop on United, which you’ll find as a result in the ‘shortest’ category. But if you click on the “cheapest” category, you can book one leg from JFK to London (LGW) on Norwegian, and then a Ryanair ticket from London (LGW) to Dublin (DUB), saving you several hundred dollars. Booking directly on the app makes it easier than heading to each airline’s page and booking separate tickets. This app is free to download.
Today, with profits essentially non-existent, airlines are oftentimes not releasing Premium seating for flight upgrades until an hour (or even minutes) before the flight's departure, hoping to sell those seats at full cash value. Only at this point do the airlines release the empty (non-purchased) Premium seats to their frequent flyers who use miles to get the award or the flight upgrade. So it becomes a race among frequent travelers to position themselves to obtain one of the coveted few Premium seats. And everyone you speak with seems to have their own method and strategy for getting into position to take advantage of these hard to come by flight upgrades.
I use Yahoo to search for fares, but although during the search it allows me to narrow down earliest and latest departure (and/or arrival) times, it doesn’t update the price range available based on that, so I doubt it could do useful alert based on that. (I’ve used Yapta for watching a specific flight I’ve already booked to see if it goes down, but that’s a bit different.)
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If I want to use American miles to book a flight on Air Tahiti Nui — a partner some AA agents aren’t aware of — I’ll look up the flight availability on ExpertFlyer first. Once I find an available seat, I’ll call and ask an American agent for the specific flight and fare class I see on ExpertFlyer. If they cannot locate it, I’ll even use the airline’s two-character IATA code to help the agent find the flight I’m trying to book with miles (if you don’t know this code, see below; it’s included in the ExpertFlyer results).
Sometimes you might be planning a trip but can’t fully commit to buying the tickets just yet. Price Alerts let you monitor the price history of your chosen flight so you can pounce if the airfares suddenly start to creep up. Or perhaps you want to go away on a specific weekend but the flights are far too expensive. Set a Price Alert and you’ll be sent an email immediately if there’s a price drop. Flight prices change frequently, but Price Alerts mean you won’t be caught on the hop if flight prices skyrocket – and you won’t miss out on a deal if prices plummet.

Buy an extra seat. One interesting tactic to find yourself some breathing room offered by Petersen might appeal to folks traveling on very cheap sale fares: buy two coach tickets. Say you find one of these $100 roundtrip fares to Florida or the like; the airlines that offer these usually make up the difference in fees for checked bags, movies, food and other extras. However, if you don’t need headphones or to check a second bag, you can skip all those charges, and get yourself a heap of legroom for $50 — less than the cost of most premium seats.
When it comes to flight upgrades, the airlines are caught in what is viewed by many to be a real Catch-22. Like any business, the airlines have an obligation to maximize revenue and make money for the company. Part of this revenue is generated from the outright sale of tickets in their Premium cabins - First Class and Business Class. However, they also have an obligation to their best customers, namely the frequent flyer and more specifically the Elite flyer to offer flight upgrades and other incentives. Maintaining, and even growing, the base of frequent flyers of an airline depends almost entirely on the "value" of their frequent flyer programs, especially for Elite members. The value of most programs is often judged by the number of seats an airline allocates for either free or mileage upgrades in the very same Premium cabins they are obligated to sell. Hence the Catch-22.

Yapta.com: The newest entrant in this burgeoning field. There are two things you can do here: first, if you've already bought a fare, you can enter the flight locator number and then you'll get an alert if the fare has gone down. (Some airlines will refund the entire fare difference in the form of a voucher good for future travel within a year; others deduct $25 to over $300, depending on the fare and route.) But there's also a "Tagger" feature where you can track fares on individual flights, not just routes between two cities. 
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