“I always set alarms on Skyscanner to places where I need or want to visit in the near future. It lets me know when prices go down, so I can take advantage of great deals and save money on flights. It also lets me know when prices go up, so I can either catch them before they increase any further or put that trip on the back-burner for now.” —Inma Gregario, 34, a travel blogger who takes at least one trip a month
Secret Flying can be a winner, if you're flexible about when you travel. There's no need to sign up – simply visit its (free) site to view cheap flights. You can filter by destination and month. It will direct you to the airline's website to book. Some deals may be in euros or dollars – make sure you pay with a specialist card to avoid hefty conversion fees.
Thankfully, there are plenty of ways to save money on flights and lodging that don’t involve eschewing them altogether—life hacks I didn’t even realize existed until I began reporting this story. Like, did you know you can download apps that will alert you the moment the price goes down on that flight you had your eye on? Or that hotels will often offer you better deals on rooms you’ve already booked if you find that room available for a cheaper price after the fact on some other site? The list goes on. And here it is:
Southwest offers daily "Ding" (southwest.com/ding) deals that pop up on your computer (announced by an audible "ding," thus the name) that can save a few bucks off their already low fares. Frontier Airlines has begun sending out similar fares by e-mail. In both cases, the fares expire the same day they're announced but they're often good for travel far into the future.

Delta	Aeroflot, Aerolineas Argentinas, AeroMexico, AirEuropa, Air France, Alaska Airlines, Alitalia, China Airlines, China Eastern, China Southern, Czech Airlines, Garuda Indonesia, GOL Airlines, Hawaiian Airlines, Jet Wirways, KLM, Korean Air, Middle Eastern Airlines, Seabourne Airlines, Transavia, Tarom, Vietnam Airlines, Virgin Atlantic, Virgin Australia, Westjet, Xiamen Air.

For example, if you’re flying to Malaysia, it might be much cheaper to fly into neighbouring Singapore instead of Malaysia’s capital of Kuala Lumpur. If you’re going to Albania, you’ll have better luck flying into Curfu in northern Greece than to Tirana, which has only a very small airport. And if you’re going to the Netherlands, it might be much cheaper to fly into Eindhoven and then taking a train than flying into Amsterdam.
Compare ticket prices at different venues. When Bruce Springsteen played in the New York metropolitan area, seats on the resale market were far cheaper at the Prudential Center in Newark, N.J., than at either Madison Square Garden or Barclays Center in Brooklyn, said Will Flaherty, SeatGeek’s vice president of growth marketing. When Beyoncé was on tour, the cheapest ticket to see her at Citi Field in Queens, N.Y., was $140, and that was for a lousy seat. Compare that with the cost of seeing Queen Bey at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh a week earlier, where tickets on the resale market could be had for as little as $28; $140 bought a seat close to the stage, Flaherty said.

So buyer, beware. People have been ripped off by scalpers even before the internet was invented, and many states have laws against them. Even though these laws are haphazardly enforced, scalping tickets carries some risk. But if you really want to get into the building and it’s only an hour before showtime, you’re going to have to go nose to nose with some of the best negotiators in the business world. Make sure you follow the steps below to get the best deal.
Whether you know exactly where you’re going or you just want to find to the cheapest possible country to fly into, Kiwi.com is a great tool to get the wanderlust going and save some big bucks. Hop on their site and enter your departure city, then select a date range to fly. Approximate costs then appear over hundreds of countries around the globe from your departure point, while the list of destinations is sorted by price, allowing you to see the most cost-effective place you can fly.
If you're using more than one page to search, it's a good idea to close the other pages before you book, and try deleting your browser's cache to ensure you're seeing the most up-to-date price. Forumites recommend clearing your internet cookies and starting with a new browser page, too, or even using a different browser altogether to look for quotes.
While many theories exist around booking specifically on a Tuesday to save money, the reality is there is no consistent truth to exactly which days are cheapest to fly. Most of the time it is cheaper to leave on a weekday, though this isn’t always the case. Your best strategy is to get a quick visual of prices for a whole month to see what days are cheapest for your specific route. Here’s how:
Online travel agencies, such as Kayak, Travelocity and Orbitz, have made the search for inexpensive airfare easier than ever. Perhaps because of that, many travelers begin and end their search for airfares with one of these sites. Yet there is more a traveler can do to find moderately priced airfares with fewer stops and/or better timing; stopping after the initial search means missing out on these opportunities.

StubHub tries to say that it is a 15% seller fee and 10% buyer fee, but since all buyers see the final price, the reality is that the full burden effectively falls on the seller.  But selling via StubHub is very easy, safe, and efficient.  So if you have enough profit potential in your tickets, you can still do well selling at StubHub despite the fees. 

In a world filled with more options than ever, it's your job as a consumer to stay informed. Luckily, the businesses that want you to choose them have made it easier than ever to stay up to date. Whether you have a trip coming up soon, or simply know that you'll be planning a vacation sometime next year, take some time to prepare. When the time comes, you'll have all the information you need to get the best deal.
Ok.. So there’s this guy on our local swap and shop on Facebook, claiming to sell Disney on ice tickets for $140 for 4 tickets when they should be about $250 or more and he’s flaked out on me before getting these tickets, now he’s saying he has the tickets but I’m scared there fakes.. How can I spot them out before j give him my money and get to PNC arena and have 2 very upset kids and a pissed off husband for wasting his money.. HELP!!
Use Points: If you belong to frequent flier programs from airlines in the Star Alliance, Oneworld and Skyteam networks, you can use your frequent flier points to book tickets to Europe, provided you have enough. Don’t quite meet the minimum requirements? See if your chosen airline will let you upgrade to Business Class with the points you do have – you may be pleasantly surprised.
I’m an oddity in the miles/points game. I’ve been in it a few years now and I still don’t have a business card! I don’t mind flying any alliance though at the moment I am an elite for a skyteam airline… and I don’t have any hotel loyalty. Anyways, the only time I resell on stubhub is whenever I have to fulfill a minimum spend for the bonus points (most of the time it ranges $1500-$3000 for a period of 3 months) but I really utilized my reselling skills a year ago when I had to meet $10k minimum spends for the the citi AAexec cards!

Whenever I Google flights the tickets for Lufthansa come out to around $1,700 so since we want Lufthansa for sure for all of these flights I went on the Lufthansa website directly and searched for the last two weeks the price for all of these 4 flights came out to $1,383 and went up/down until it hit $1,393 a few days ago for one adult ticket and the child ticket was $1,176 and went up a few dollars as well; and yesterday when I checked it was Tuesday, October 17, 2017 and the price went up to $1,418 for each adult and $1,198 for a child ticket (we are traveling with 2 adults and 1 child age 4). So I noticed the price is slowly going up by a few dollars until it jumped from last week to this week by around $20-$30.
I’m curious if these tips work for business class? My travel is transatlantic – USA to The UK – and I’ve found that the so-called brokers who can save 50-70% can’t do any better than I can myself using Kayak or a similar search engine. It’s more expensive but as a big guy the extra comfort on a long flight is worth it in my opinion. Still, I like to save where I can as that is the most expensive part of my trips.

One time I bought lower bowl center court just one ticket since my friends already had 3 tickets for themselves and I tagged along last minute. I bought for $40 from a scalper. I get to the lady telling you where your seat is at near center court and she looks up at me and says,"This ticket says your disabled!" I immediate grabbed the railing fallin to one knee yelling aloud,"Ooohhhh my leg, it hurts, get me to a seat quick" as everyone in the vicinity just died laughing including the ticket lady. She gave me a good seat for the game.
I’m an oddity in the miles/points game. I’ve been in it a few years now and I still don’t have a business card! I don’t mind flying any alliance though at the moment I am an elite for a skyteam airline… and I don’t have any hotel loyalty. Anyways, the only time I resell on stubhub is whenever I have to fulfill a minimum spend for the bonus points (most of the time it ranges $1500-$3000 for a period of 3 months) but I really utilized my reselling skills a year ago when I had to meet $10k minimum spends for the the citi AAexec cards!

If you book a flight plus separate hotel or car hire together from the same travel website in the same transaction, you get full ATOL financial and legal protection, just as with a traditional package holiday. If you book these elements from the same site, but in different transactions, you'll only get financial protection, even if they're not part of a formal package.
Getting a cheap flight is really about timing. Prices fluctuate heavily and often on all routes. Booking a flight today from London to Bali could cost £600, but tomorrow it could be £300 on the same airline. These unannounced sales – when an airline suddenly drops its prices – are triggered because airlines release tickets 11 months in advance and predict what percentage of tickets will be sold as time moves on. For example, after five months they may expect to have sold 30% of the tickets but if sales are not as high as anticipated, it will announce a flash sale. Prices will plummet (by up to 60% on occasions) for a few days until demand catches up.
As with many companies, sales reps and executives are their most frequent travelers. Many times a sales rep will know exactly when they are leaving on a trip but are uncertain as to when they will actually return and have a need for an open-ended ticket. This means the purchase of a full fare ticket or at the very least, changing an existing ticket with a penalty of $75 or more. Each fare bucket offered by an airline comes with its own set of restrictions and many times purchasing a ticket that is not the lowest fare available (but not full fare), will allow flight changes without penalty and provide maximum frequent flyer points.
Senior Editor Sarah Schlichter's idea of a perfect trip includes spotting exotic animals, hiking through pristine landscapes, exploring new neighborhoods on foot, and soaking up as much art as she can. She often attempts to recreate recipes from her international travels after she gets home (which has twice resulted in accidental kitchen fires -- no humans or animals were harmed).
I also sell tickets and this accounts for a portion of my self-employment income – I sold over $100,000 in tickets in 2014 and I’m way way small time. John is correct in assessing that this blog post is a terrible idea. The reason is because you’ll lose money on many, many, many events. Just saying “hey, this is a popular concert/show/sporting event” isn’t enough knowledge to know if you can turn a profit. There are a lot of other factors. For example, you may buy tickets to a concert at face value only to learn that people from a pre-sale or VIP program bought them for X% less. Good luck selling those on stubhub at a profit once they take their cut. Sporting events are seriously cutthroat, and it’s hard to make money unless you’re a season ticket holder. I paid $13,000 for my St. Louis Cardinals Season tickets. I might break even or take a small loss. I buy them to be able to give out some games as a promotion through my business and to have access to postseason tickets. You make all your money on the postseason, at least with the Cardinals. Even if you could turn a small profit from buying these season tickets regularly, you pay for them months before the season starts and you don’t get paid until you deliver the tickets for each game. Your money is tied up for months and months. You could use that money for other ‘angles’ and make more money overall due to faster turnover. I sell tickets because I enjoy it. And I’m being sincere and genuine when I say that if you’re just trying to earn points/miles, please stay far, far away unless you truly understand the real downside risk. I lose money on over 50% of the tickets I sell – that’s a true story. If you’re just dabbling, you’re hoping you’re going to pick the golden event and avoid the rest? That sounds like a terrible investment strategy to me.
Some think that aggregators such as Skyscanner or Kayak always lead to an online travel agent (OTA) with the cheapest flight price. But while they can help with some airlines, others are better booked directly. These include low-cost carriers such as Norwegian, and charter airlines such as Thomas Cook. Anything but a standard full-service international carrier will often have cheaper prices if you book through the airline itself.
Ticket scalping (aka ticket reselling) is an illegitimate practice of buying tickets to an event and reselling them at inflated rates in the secondary market. In the pre-internet era, ticket touts bought the tickets physically and sold them for a huge profit. Today, bots are programmed by attackers to scalp a maximum number of tickets from a portal as soon as a sale or booking opens.
Companies who resell tickets are called ticket brokers. Some would argue they are scalpers, as well. However, reputable ticket brokers follow laws, register with the Better Business Bureau and National Association of Ticket Brokers, make you pay with a credit card and take steps to safeguard against fraud. So there is a difference between buying from a street scalper and an online "scalper," even if it hits your pocketbook the same way.
Rarely ever do airline tickets get cheaper as your departure date approaches, especially if you need to fly on a certain date. Budget airlines typically offer low rates as a baseline price, and as these tickets sell, the remaining ones increase in cost. This is very typical in Europe and Australia. If you know when and where you’re going, don’t wait on an unknown sale. More often than not, your biggest savings come from booking far ahead when you can.
And so the new way of thinking about pricing for these events is dynamic pricing. So much like an airline or a hotel, you fluctuate price based on how demand is going. And so it makes intuitive sense, but I think what most people miss on this is demand is very different. So for instance, demand for a flight from Boston to LA, there’s actually nine non-stops a day. And in fact, I looked for Thursday. The prices for these non-stops range from $369 to $2,278.
Unless you want to travel at the height of a peak travel season or over a holiday, you don't have to book months in advance.About one month from departure, prices tend to either drop or shoot up significantly, so you take some risk booking 6 to 8 weeks out, but you can also avoid paying more should fares go up 4 weeks from departure. There's no specific best day of the week to book, but booking Tuesday through Thursday tends to help you avoid the weekend rush and find more deals.
If you don't want to put in the leg work, you can let the deals come to you. Condé Nast Traveler shares many of the best flight deals on social media, but for those even more obsessed, it's hard to beat the convenience of flight deal blogs like Scott's Cheap Flights, Airfarewatchdog, SecretFlying, and TheFlightDeal, which are constantly posting deals from around the world. Follow them on social media or sign up for their newsletters.

Ok.. So there’s this guy on our local swap and shop on Facebook, claiming to sell Disney on ice tickets for $140 for 4 tickets when they should be about $250 or more and he’s flaked out on me before getting these tickets, now he’s saying he has the tickets but I’m scared there fakes.. How can I spot them out before j give him my money and get to PNC arena and have 2 very upset kids and a pissed off husband for wasting his money.. HELP!!
Realistically, it may be difficult to fight your corner if an airline does cancel your flight. If you've already booked other aspects of your trip such as accommodation, you can try to claim it as 'consequential loss' from the airline you booked with – but there are no guarantees this will work. Ultimately you'd likely need to go to the small claims court to try to get back any additional costs incurred (but again there are no guarantees).
If you don't want to put in the leg work, you can let the deals come to you. Condé Nast Traveler shares many of the best flight deals on social media, but for those even more obsessed, it's hard to beat the convenience of flight deal blogs like Scott's Cheap Flights, Airfarewatchdog, SecretFlying, and TheFlightDeal, which are constantly posting deals from around the world. Follow them on social media or sign up for their newsletters.
And the first is, there’s just a great deal of uncertainty when a ticket price is set, whether it’s for a baseball game that the Red Sox are doing well or not, or even a rock concert. The Rolling Stones can be very hot in some cities and not so hot in other cities. And so one of the key reasons is due to this uncertainty, many sports teams and musicians tend to be conservative, and set a low price. The second key reason is there’s generally a hesitancy to set prices too high, because there’s a brand or goodwill associated with these entities, and they don’t want to set prices too high to damage that.
Online travel agencies, such as Kayak, Travelocity and Orbitz, have made the search for inexpensive airfare easier than ever. Perhaps because of that, many travelers begin and end their search for airfares with one of these sites. Yet there is more a traveler can do to find moderately priced airfares with fewer stops and/or better timing; stopping after the initial search means missing out on these opportunities.
The Google-powered ITA Matrix lets you search for one-way, round trip, or multi-city flights and specify parameters like airline and routing. It's also great for searching with flexible terms, if, for example, you want to search for an entire month of fares. You don't book directly through the ITA Matrix; rather, you book directly with airlines once you've found a fare.

I am planning to book an open jaw ticket San Francisco-Paris, Mykonos-San Francisco leaving in late May, returning in mid June. The cheapest I have found using every site I know are around $1800. I was thinking a good price would be around $1300 – $1500, but it may be too late to get these fares. Do you think prices could drop some? Should I wait until January to book? Kayak is not able to give me a buy/wait recommendation.
If you are uncertain about the routes that these low-cost carriers fly, check them out online. For instance, JetBlue serves many of the major U.S. cities, particularly on the East Coast. It also has numerous vacation destinations in Central and South America and the Caribbean; Southwest serves most major U.S. cities as well as a few in Central America and Puerto Rico; Frontier serves most major U.S. cities as well as vacation spots in Mexico, Jamaica and the Dominican Republic; Allegiant Air's focus is transporting leisure travelers to warm vacation destinations like Punta Gorda, Tampa Bay, Las Vegas, Orlando, Los Angeles and Phoenix.
Momondo primarily compares the prices of third-party booking sites, including some international ones you have probably never heard of before, to find the lowest price! Even though many airlines require you to book directly through their website to score the best deal (as they keep the best prices for themselves), these two search engines can help you find the best flight options as they access the metadata from each carrier so you can save time as well.
First, sign up for airfare price drop alerts. Many websites now offer these at no charge, sending out lists of unusually cheap fares (some of them "fat finger" mistake fares), that while valid for travel over several months, usually expire quickly. Take a look at theflightdeal.com, hitlistapp.com, secretflying.com, exitfares.com and Fly4free.com. They often have the same deals but I suggest signing up for all of them and to follow them on Twitter if you use it. Other sites, such as Kayak.com, Yapta.com and GoogleFlights.com, will track fares on specific flights and dates and alert you to price drops. When you see a great deal buy it (you can always change your mind and cancel within 24 hours, per U.S. D.O.T. regulations).
Knowing which tickets will sell out is exactly what we do here at ticketflipping. We look at hundreds of shows to select which will most likely sell out. By understanding the ticket scalping economics, we examine each shows popularity, venues capacity, location, etc... There are hundreds of factors which can influence how much a show will sell out and how much the tickets will increase in price. If you want to learn how select these tickets check out these 4 training videos which explain the overall ticket scalping economics.
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