This doesn’t seem to bother fans. Barry Arakelian told me that he had a great time at the Petty show, regardless of the fact that he paid $825 to see a show that should have cost about $200. He would have paid even more, he said, if he knew the money was going to an artist he admired. “And if I paid the higher price,” he said proudly, “you’d shut out the scalpers.”
“Hostelworld.com is my go-to site for finding somewhere to stay. It has a huge inventory of hostels, bed and breakfasts, and hotels, giving travelers tons of affordable options to choose from. The site also includes reviews from other travelers, so you can see which options are the safest, cleanest, and most welcoming.” —Trang Pham-Nguyen, 29, a travel blogger who used to live abroad and now takes full advantage of her vacation days
And so after that, there was a lot of discussion about this. Amazon came out and said that, we aren’t going to offer different prices to different customers at the same time. So what they didn’t say is that, we are not going to vary prices over time. They just said they were going to stop that practice. So what you are seeing on the web is that, since it’s a great experimental venue and you could see how people react, you are going to see on the web more price experimentation by all types of retailers, to try and figure out what is exactly the right price for products.

I’m curious if these tips work for business class? My travel is transatlantic – USA to The UK – and I’ve found that the so-called brokers who can save 50-70% can’t do any better than I can myself using Kayak or a similar search engine. It’s more expensive but as a big guy the extra comfort on a long flight is worth it in my opinion. Still, I like to save where I can as that is the most expensive part of my trips.
I’m kind of a relative newbie to the points/miles hobby (just ask Shawn). My sorry little blog is truly an endeavor targeted at friends and family who would (sorry Shawn) never come to MtM (or even the pure “deals” websites). I haven’t done a conference of any sort, but I would love to go to Trevor’s ResellingDO. (Just too far away! come out West, Trevor!) Maybe someday I will expand on this brief introduction (and sure there’s many other folks far more experience than I am!), whether on this blog or at a conference. I’m glad you found it an interesting topic.

If it looks like the delay is going to cost you more than the airline is offering -- like if you had a non-refundable hotel reservation, or miss a private helicopter ride (look at you!) -- you’ve got 30 days to try and get as much money out of them as you can. But once you put a check into your bank account, you’ve essentially agreed to accept whatever you were offered.


Well, little did we know that the game was sold out. Anyways, it took forever to get (2) decent tickets which ended up 5th row 35 yard line. Just needed 1 more ticket. While we are standing there some guy comes up and says he doesn't have a ticket, but he can get us into the game. Well, it was about game time and there were NO scalpers anywhere. He waves to the guy at the gate collecting tickets who waves back. He says,"You give me $40, I get you in the door, but you have to find your own seat. Well, we paid and I ended up sitting two rows behind my brother and friend until owners of those seats showed up near halftime then I moved a few seats over rest of game. Success.
The simplest way to sell tickets is also not surprisingly the most expensive.  You are probably familiar with StubHub.com. Much like its parent company, eBay, it has become the de facto market leader in its space. This is both good and bad. The good news is that buyers know to look there and are generally confident to buy there, given its “Fan Protect” guarantee. Unfortunately, as a seller, you pay a steep ~25% to sell there.
These days the fan rip-off scheme by ticket scalpers (or ticket touts) who are speculating on a massive demand for the shows has become too common: major shows sell out within minutes and tickets almost immediately are listed on re-sale websites leaving fans frustrated and annoyed buy sky high prices, often the same ticket illegally copied and sold several times or any other sorts of fake event tickets.
Momondo primarily compares the prices of third-party booking sites, including some international ones you have probably never heard of before, to find the lowest price! Even though many airlines require you to book directly through their website to score the best deal (as they keep the best prices for themselves), these two search engines can help you find the best flight options as they access the metadata from each carrier so you can save time as well.
During a lengthy tarmac delay in the US (upon either arrival or departure), the DOT says an airline can’t keep you on a plane for more than three hours (on a domestic flight) or four hours (on an international flight) without allowing you to get off if you wish. Even listening in on what your pilot is saying to air traffic control probably won’t keep you entertained for that length of time. Also, the airline is obligated to get that food and water cart running down the aisle after two hours of delay.
One time I bought lower bowl center court just one ticket since my friends already had 3 tickets for themselves and I tagged along last minute. I bought for $40 from a scalper. I get to the lady telling you where your seat is at near center court and she looks up at me and says,"This ticket says your disabled!" I immediate grabbed the railing fallin to one knee yelling aloud,"Ooohhhh my leg, it hurts, get me to a seat quick" as everyone in the vicinity just died laughing including the ticket lady. She gave me a good seat for the game.
Thank you for choosing. When low cost carriers like JetBlue or Easyjet simplified their pricing structure to offer lower prices more often, it wasn't long before everyone was doing it. But not every airline's price structure works in the same way. That's why we compare so many airlines across hundreds of travel sites to get you the best price. You could say we have a flair for finding the cheapest fare (but maybe not for poetry).
If it doesn't really matter when you fly (Aunt Mary will be just as happy to see you in August as in September), you can sometimes save hundreds by adjusting your travel dates, often by just a day or two. Travelocity used to have the best flexible date search option in the industry for two reasons: it searched 330 days ahead, and it included international flights both between the U.S. and international destinations, and also flights between international cities. Thanks to an edict from the U.S. Department of Transportation, Travelocity no longer lists fares internationally (because they neglected to include all the fuel surcharges and other add-ons), but they're still a valuable source for domestic flights. And if you really like Travelocity and miss its full flexible search functions, visit its Asian affiliate Zuji.com (www.zuji.com) where you can search flights in U.S. dollars (apparently the U.S. DOT's reach doesn't extend to Asia).
[…] Over time I have tried to cover just about every type of manufactured spending on this blog. I don’t advocate all methods for all people, however I do think it is good to diversify your knowledge so you can jump on the best deals. For that reason I have covered gift card reselling, traditional MS and PDX Deals Guy even wrote about ticket reselling. […]
From Vancouver to Puerto Vallarta, the best deal was found on Kayak: $1720.96 for four travellers. The most expensive was found on Air Canada’s website with a grand total of $5,250, a difference in savings of $3,529.04. Kayak’s website gave a “hacker’s deal.” The company has trademarked the phrase, which are roundtrip fares pieced together from one-way flights on a number of airlines. Typically consumers are not able to purchase that on most booking sites.
Remember that it’s all in the timing. SeatGeek’s Flaherty said that no matter the event, a better deal is likely to emerge the longer you delay your purchase (see “Patience Pays Off,” below). Optimally, the time to act is within 48 hours of showtime, according to SeatGeek’s statistics. “Tickets are perishable goods,” Flaherty explained. “On the resale market, the price typically decreases the closer you get to the event, though you might lose some flexibility, like the ability to get five seats together.”
Hi David, I’m looking to fly to Rome 5/28/18 to 6/4/18 from LAX. I’m currently looking at Norwegian Air’s direct flights — their lowest tier is about $850 and LowFare+ (with seat choice, checked bag, meals) is about $1k. The list of tips recommend I wait a few more weeks before buying but I was just wondering if you think it would still be a good idea to wait? Is it likely to drop in the next month? Thank you!
That unused ticket for the delayed or canceled flight? It’s still good to use another time; think of it like an airline credit you got for your aggravation. If you’ve had it with that (expletive) airline and vowed never to fly them again, even for free -- you have principles, dammit! -- you can also request an “involuntary refund” for the flight from which you were bumped.
Any more time and you might want to consider a more unplanned trip that utilises budget airlines and cheap off-season one way tickets. It’s not unreasonable to be able to do an around the world trip using the buy-as-you-go method for half the price of a true RTW ticket.  And the freedom you get from having an unplanned itinerary is fun and liberating.
Stopovers can range from a mere hour to even a full day (or more), so it's really up to you whether you would prefer paying less for your flights in exchange for doing some time at the connecting airport. The biggest issue is that time spent in airports eats into the "free" time you would otherwise enjoy at your final destination. If you do settle for a trip with a long layover, check into sights to see or activities to do near your layover airport. A 10-hour layover might provide the perfect opportunity to visit a famous landmark or explore a new city. To each, his own.
Stick to the major players. In addition to StubHub and TicketsNow, established resellers include Razorgator, Vivid Seats, and ScoreBig, which all offer money-back guarantees in the unlikely event a ticket is a counterfeit. (Fake tickets are a potentially bigger problem if you buy from individuals on sites such as eBay or Craigs­list.) You can shop on individual websites or use SeatGeek, a search engine that scours dozens of resale sites. When shopping, you should also:

I also sell tickets and this accounts for a portion of my self-employment income – I sold over $100,000 in tickets in 2014 and I’m way way small time. John is correct in assessing that this blog post is a terrible idea. The reason is because you’ll lose money on many, many, many events. Just saying “hey, this is a popular concert/show/sporting event” isn’t enough knowledge to know if you can turn a profit. There are a lot of other factors. For example, you may buy tickets to a concert at face value only to learn that people from a pre-sale or VIP program bought them for X% less. Good luck selling those on stubhub at a profit once they take their cut. Sporting events are seriously cutthroat, and it’s hard to make money unless you’re a season ticket holder. I paid $13,000 for my St. Louis Cardinals Season tickets. I might break even or take a small loss. I buy them to be able to give out some games as a promotion through my business and to have access to postseason tickets. You make all your money on the postseason, at least with the Cardinals. Even if you could turn a small profit from buying these season tickets regularly, you pay for them months before the season starts and you don’t get paid until you deliver the tickets for each game. Your money is tied up for months and months. You could use that money for other ‘angles’ and make more money overall due to faster turnover. I sell tickets because I enjoy it. And I’m being sincere and genuine when I say that if you’re just trying to earn points/miles, please stay far, far away unless you truly understand the real downside risk. I lose money on over 50% of the tickets I sell – that’s a true story. If you’re just dabbling, you’re hoping you’re going to pick the golden event and avoid the rest? That sounds like a terrible investment strategy to me.


While many theories exist around booking specifically on a Tuesday to save money, the reality is there is no consistent truth to exactly which days are cheapest to fly. Most of the time it is cheaper to leave on a weekday, though this isn’t always the case. Your best strategy is to get a quick visual of prices for a whole month to see what days are cheapest for your specific route. Here’s how:
Today's business climate has forced most companies to operate in the "lean and mean" mode. This is probably evidenced most with everyday expenses such as business travel. While our willingness to help the company reduce necessary costs for travel and entertainment by securing the lowest possible airfare available, the reality is that oftentimes the lowest airfare is not necessarily a cost savings for the company but an additional expense.
Pick a seat as early as possible. Most airlines let you choose your seat when you book, and most charge extra for roomier seats. If your first choice is not open, select another seat and try to change it later. If seat assignments aren't available at booking, ask about the earliest possible date that you can request your seat (for example, 90 or 30 days before your flight) — and put it on your calendar. A week before your flight, airlines will sometimes release extra seats or change equipment: Check to see if you can get a better seat. And try to check in online exactly 24 hours before your flight, when even more seats may be released — including bulkhead and exit-row seats.

5. Know your laws: There's no federal law against scalping, but you'll need to find out what's in play where you live. In New York, for instance, the state let its sky's-the-limit scalping permission lapse in June 2010. Now somewhat strict, but cloudy, rules supposedly govern both online and onsite transactions there. Whether the activity is being rigorously monitored is anyone's guess.


In fact, many people use their credit card to pay for travel without even knowing that doing so may entitle them to travel benefits. Perks which you may be entitled to when you use your credit card to pay, like medical evacuation coverage (The Platinum Card® from American Express, a GET.com advertiser) which can cover the cost of transporting you home in case of a medical emergency, airline credit towards incidental costs and even towards airfare, discounts at hotels and restaurants (Visa, Mastercard and American Express offer these, and your bank may offer more).
Now, there are caveats, so don't go booking out an entire planeful of tickets just for shits and giggles. First, with most airlines, you can cancel/change your ticket up to seven days before you’re scheduled to travel and still get a full refund. (The notable exception is American Airlines, which instead allows you to hold a ticket up to 24 hours at the price you see.) Second, you need to book directly with the airline's website, and not through a third-party booking site, although big ones like Expedia or Travelocity offer policies similar to those of airlines. But the big takeaway: You can have buyer's remorse for up to a full day. And some airlines -- like Southwest -- have even more generous refund policies that let you change plans up until right before you take off.
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