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In Google Chrome or Safari, incognito is enabled by hitting Command (or “Control” if using PC), Shift, “N”. For Mozilla Firefox or Internet Explorer, hit Command (or “Control” if using a PC), Shift, “P”. This will open a new browser window where your information is not tracked, thus not inflating prices as you search. Note: if you’re using an older version of OS X, open Safari then click “Safari” in the menu bar, and select “Private Browsing”.


Spotting fake tickets can be difficult, especially if the fake ticket is printed on the same material as that real tickets. This can happen when material is stolen from the company that prints the real tickets. The best way to ensure that a ticket is real, is to purchase it yourself from a legitimate ticket agency, such as Ticketmaster, or to take it to the venue before the event and ask the staff to scan it to see if it is real. Beyond that, there may not be a great way to tell until you get ejected from the event. If you have received a suspicious looking ticket, it is best to check into it before the night of the event.
Momondo primarily compares the prices of third-party booking sites, including some international ones you have probably never heard of before, to find the lowest price! Even though many airlines require you to book directly through their website to score the best deal (as they keep the best prices for themselves), these two search engines can help you find the best flight options as they access the metadata from each carrier so you can save time as well.
Realistically, it may be difficult to fight your corner if an airline does cancel your flight. If you've already booked other aspects of your trip such as accommodation, you can try to claim it as 'consequential loss' from the airline you booked with – but there are no guarantees this will work. Ultimately you'd likely need to go to the small claims court to try to get back any additional costs incurred (but again there are no guarantees).

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A few weeks ago, I met Barry Arakelian a minute after he got scammed at a Tom Petty concert. Arakelian had paid a scalper $375 for two tickets (face value: $135) outside the Beacon Theater in Manhattan. The tickets, however, turned out to be fakes, and Arakelian, who was getting the evil eye from his girlfriend, approached a nearby police officer for help. But the officer said that he couldn’t do anything unless Arakelian could locate the scalper in the crush of people. By that point the scalper was long gone; Arakelian was embarrassed. Naturally, a minute later, he turned and shouted to no one in particular, “Who’s got two tickets?”
It's often cheaper to buy two fares rather than one. Let's say you're flying from New York to Eleuthera in the Bahamas. Check on one of the big sites like Expedia or Orbitz for a single fare (for example, JFK to Governor's Harbor, Bahamas) and then do two separate searches (JFK to Nassau and Nassau to Governor's Harbor). Chances are the two-fare strategy will save you a lot of cash. This fare trick also works for flights to Europe (fly into London or Manchester, UK on one fare and then hop on a discount European airline to reach your final destination) and Asia. To search route possibilities on these discounters, check out the Airfarewatchdog route maps page.
Orbitz.com is now the leader in international searches, with two caveats: you can only search by 30-day windows, and for reasons only known to themselves, they have been playing a cat and mouse game with their flexible search function, hiding it one week, and displaying it on their home page the next (if you can't find it, try looking on their site map). Orbitz's flexible search is powered by ITASoftware (www.itasoftware.com), which has its own problems, frequently sending back undecipherable error messages (be patient, it eventually will work). Increasingly, individual airline sites are improving their flexible date search functions. American, AerLingus, Air New Zealand, Spirit, Southwest, and USA3000 all have decent ones.
So buyer, beware. People have been ripped off by scalpers even before the internet was invented, and many states have laws against them. Even though these laws are haphazardly enforced, scalping tickets carries some risk. But if you really want to get into the building and it’s only an hour before showtime, you’re going to have to go nose to nose with some of the best negotiators in the business world. Make sure you follow the steps below to get the best deal. 

Kiwi.com, on the other hand, will mix and match airlines (including budget airlines) in order to find you the very cheapest route. For long-haul flights especially, this can make a huge difference. The same search on Kiwi.com returns a route at $459.80 USD via JetBlue, Norwegian Air, and Vueling. That’s a savings of $171.40 USD, and the travel time is even shorter!
Many airline websites allow customers to purchase one fare and "up fare" the purchase to a higher fare by the calling the Web Services phone number for that airline. This allows travelers to avoid penalties incurred by booking the ticket through a reservation agent while also giving them credit for any "online booking mileage bonus points" the airline may be offering.
This one's simple on the surface: Use points. It's the earning of those points that can seem complicated and overwhelming. While our best advice is to pick an airline and stick with it, as best you can, finding the perfect frequent flier program requires a little researching, and asking yourself three questions. How easy is it to earn points? (The quicker you earn, the quicker you can spend.) Where do this airline fly? (You want access to places you actually want to go.) And how easy it is to spend your points? (There's no need to complicate this.) While there's no one-size-fits-all airline rewards program, we have a few U.S.-based favorites:
On your way to a game/tailgate/car park/on the highway, you'll probably hear people yelling "need tickets." He's not asking for one—he wants to sell them. More often than not, the tickets you buy are copies of an original ticket—which means that as soon as you get into the stadium, you're screwed. I've heard the story a number of times. It's not fun.
Some low-cost airlines do not allow their prices to be included among the meta-search results because they prefer you to buy directly on their website due to already low prices. Information about their campaigns and discounts are usually communicated directly through their e-news and social channels. Therefore, it makes sense to subscribe to their e-newsletter (if you use Gmail, you can create a filter that allows you to collect all low-cost mail in one folder. Here it is explained how to do it).
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