Be loud. You don't exactly need to have a brilliant marketing scheme when it comes to scalping tickets, but you do need to make people aware that you're selling them. Be loud, and shout what you're selling. including the type and number of seats. You can repeat this information loudly. If there is a demand for what you're selling, people will eventually come up to you and ask.
I agree that ticket reselling is probably not the most efficient form of MS. But it can be a profitable reselling endeavor, not unlike other reselling approaches. As with any business venture or MS strategy, clearly one needs to become educated and decide what works best for them. And as Shawn always advocates on this blog, start small. If it works for you, do more. If it doesn’t, stop.
This doesn’t seem to bother fans. Barry Arakelian told me that he had a great time at the Petty show, regardless of the fact that he paid $825 to see a show that should have cost about $200. He would have paid even more, he said, if he knew the money was going to an artist he admired. “And if I paid the higher price,” he said proudly, “you’d shut out the scalpers.” 

There is a possibility that airlines do not honor the booking of a flight with an error fare and cancel the reject your reservation (and, of course, refund your money). Therefore, it is advisable to wait at least 14 days after the purchase, before you begin to arrange accommodation and other travel logistics. Bear in mind, that even if you receive a confirmation email after your purchase, you are still not on the 'safe' side yet. However, if you also get an electronic flight ticket ... well, then there is a high probability that you will get away with it. :)

Online travel agencies, such as Kayak, Travelocity and Orbitz, have made the search for inexpensive airfare easier than ever. Perhaps because of that, many travelers begin and end their search for airfares with one of these sites. Yet there is more a traveler can do to find moderately priced airfares with fewer stops and/or better timing; stopping after the initial search means missing out on these opportunities.
Despite persistent (and conflicting!) myths, there really is no one magic day to book plane tickets. But reliable studies show that one of the best days to buy tickets is Sunday, especially if it's more than 21 days before your trip, and prices on domestic flights dip mid-week, around Tuesday or Wednesday, because there's less demand for business travel.
Southwest Airlines actually is a pretty good budget airline to fly with. It’s actually my favorite airline to fly with, even if I have to pay a little more to fly with them. They dont charge fees for their first two checked bags nor do they charge fees to change flights. They now offer electronic boarding passes you can scan on your smartphone. They offer complimentary snacks (usually peanuts and some sort of crackers or pretzels) and drinks. They also fly to many major airports especially after merging with AirTran Airlines!
While it's possible to book your flights on most search sites (they certainly hope you will, to garner their commission), I use these sites only as a first step. Once I've zeroed in on which airline has the best deal for my trip, I check the airline's own site to compare fares. You can often avoid added costs by booking direct (the commissions are charged either as higher prices or in the form of fees for booking through a third party). And airlines may offer bonuses (such as extra frequent-flier miles) to those who book direct.
You've seen and heard them as you walk into a concert or sports event: ticket scalpers. A ticket scalper is someone who buys tickets to an entertainment or sporting event and then turns around and sells those tickets on the street for a higher price. While it's sometimes against the law to scalp tickets, it's usually not illegal for someone to buy tickets from a scalper. However, you are taking a risk by doing business using cash, in the street, with someone you don't know. It is hard to protect yourself from fraud when your dealing with a random street scalper.
There is no federal law prohibiting the use of bots, but 13 states have outlawed them and federal legislation to ban their use is pending in Congress. Though reselling tickets was once largely illegal, most states relaxed or eliminated their anti-scalping laws within the last decade or so for assorted reasons. Among them: the rise of internet ticket sales, the inability to enforce resale regulations, and the chance to collect taxes on sales.
10. Don't do what I do: This DailyFinance reporter has dabbled in scalping. I thought I could be a dynasty. Instead I performed like the '62 Mets. A few things I learned in trying to conduct Internet commerce for baseball and college basketball: Don't buy singles. (Duh, right?) Study what buyers are actually paying instead of what fellow sellers are asking. Keep in mind the size of the venue, because some monster stadiums and arenas can create a surplus. And compute the purchase fees into your profit forecast. You'll fork over 15% to StubHub for selling and a $5 service charge plus $4.95 email delivery on the buying. That's a lot to overcome if you're working both ends.

Most airlines – especially east Asian ones – get their business from local passengers. This means prices are set according to national holidays and in Asia this means that flights around western holidays, such as Christmas and Easter, are often underpriced – as the airlines don’t anticipate demand then. This is when good deals can be available. For example, last year AirChina had flights from the UK to Australia over Christmas in the low £400s. Garuda Indonesia also underpriced its flights to Bali and across Indonesia during the Christmas and New Year period. All east Asian airlines, and in particular Chinese airlines, are worth watching for this.
But getting to your Yankees game analogy, when demand is low, and it’s lower than expected, what do you do? And there’s two key things. The first is that you’re getting people coming to your site, the existing demand coming to your site. And if demand is low, intuitively people might think to make all prices cheaper. But I think if people are coming to the site to buy a ticket, they’re interested, and I would focus on trying to upsell into higher-priced seats. So they’re interested. They wouldn’t normally sit in the best seats, but if you have an attractive price, you might be able to get more money out of people who have an interest, who have a demand.
Not all season tickets are great. In fact, if the team doesn’t play in front of regular strong attendance, then you better be getting a very big discount or stay away. As I mention in the post, it doesn’t matter what kind of discount you get to the box office price, it’s all about your price versus the secondary market price. I have found that there are usually “sweet spots” (often very small sweet spots!) in season tickets. More expensive tickets are almost never the sweet spot, especially from a risk and percentage margin perspective.
Before you get started, it’s critical that you secure at least $5-10k in startup capital to give you a nice cushion when you’re first learning the ropes. Rest assured, mistakes will be made and money will be lost at the very beginning. The last thing you need is to fall behind on your monthly bills just because you’re waiting on someone to snatch up tickets that you’ve listed. Instead, make sure you have ample cash reserves to fund your venture from Day 1.
The latest research from the comparison site Momondo* found it's generally best to book 60 days ahead (last time it did the research it was 56) and that booking then can be up to 30% cheaper than booking on the day of departure. The last cheap booking date varies by destination, though, so you can use Momondo's 'Flight Insight' tab on many routes to see the data for it (see Flight Insight for info).
I never even considered the VPN bit. I’ve noticed a large difference between prices I can get here in South Africa and those a friend who lives in the States is able to get. It seems so unfair but it’s understandable. I think there’s actually a site that you can go to that gets you low prices by skipping middle layover routes, but cannot recall what it was called.
Airline credit cards generally lure you in with promises of free bags, but other credit cards offer this perk, too -- take five minutes and call your credit card company to see if this applies. Many companies also automatically offer travel insurance, which means you won’t need to buy that from the airline either. Just remember travel insurance isn’t “I decided to sleep in” insurance, and only applies in situations stipulated in the policy. So maybe read up on that.
Is it possible at all? A bullet-proof secure and transparent solution, at the same time streamlined and easy to use for fans, without extra hustle? A solution that would enable artists and promoters to control revenue and pricing both on the primary and secondary markets as well as provide flexible tools for ticket vendors, while helping maintain fair pricing for fans?
Brilliant advice, although people should make sure if they are using multiple airlines ticketed separately that they have good travel insurance. Airlines ticketed separately have no obligation if, say, the first flight is delayed and you miss your second flight. I have also had issues with lost luggage before, when airline one booked it straight through when I was ticketed separately on to airline two: both point the finger at the other and you don’t get anywhere fast! Good insurance is a must and good practice anyway!
The Simple Moving Average is first on the list of scalping indicator that can be used to create a very simple strategy. The simple moving average shows the average price over a specific time period allowing you to know if the price is going up or down, thus identifying a trend. So for example, if you wanted to plot the 7 period on a 10-minute chart, you would add all the closing prices of the last 70 minutes and divide that number by 7.  If you want to learn how to calculate simple moving averages and other types of moving averages check out this post.
Hello. Nice article. Lots of great tips. I am going to be flying into Orlando in February, 2/11-2/18/2017 and have some concerns in the flight cost. Right now spirit is the cheapest well under $200 but all of the other airlines are well over $200. We want to stay as close to $200 as possible but DO NOT want to fly spirit. Do you think that the other airlines will be dropped down at least closer to $200 mark within the next month or so?
If you’re flying somewhere that involves a transfer, say from Canada to Australia which typically involves Canada to LA, then LA to Australia, consider that it may be cheaper to book these two legs separately on your own by adding another destination to your trip. It should go without saying that in doing this, you should not book tight layovers. I repeat: do not book layovers that are hours apart! This approach is for those who want to create an additional destination of a few days or more, before catching their next flight. The one exception is when booking with Kiwi.com, who offer their own guarantee on making connecting flights even when not with the same partner airlines.

It's often cheaper to buy an air/hotel package rather than airfare alone. When we say "cheaper" we mean that the total package with hotel is often less than the airfare without the hotel component. Site59.com (www.site59.com) is the online leader in this field. Travelocity owns Site59, so you'll often see "TotalTrip" options on Travelocity just above the airfare-only search results. Don't ignore these deals. Usually, they work best only if there are two of you traveling since the hotels are based on double occupancy. They're especially useful for last-minute travel. Tour operators and your local travel agent also sell packages that might save you money, although not necessarily on last-minute deals.

I love all of these suggestions. I thoroughly enjoy reading your blog posts. I appreciate you sharing your expertise and travel insider information. I cannot wait to try the VPN and the sites you mentioned in this article. Your information is very helpful to the lay consumer. I travel domestically mostly but still find airline tickets outrageously overpriced. Safe travels wherever you might be!


Don’t go lugging an oversized suitcase filled with a whole semester’s worth of clothes (or weird contraband) through TSA, but if you’ve got a small- or medium-sized bag you’re willing to part with for a few hours, taking it to the gate and volunteering to gate check it can save you a bag fee. It also earns you goodwill with the flight crew, as you appear to be sacrificing something for the good of the plane, even though you’re just being cheap. Of course, this doesn’t apply to airlines that charge for carry-ons to begin with, and you’re probably out of luck (meaning, there’d be an administrative fee of around $50) if you’re flying Economy Plus on a legacy carrier, too.
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