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TRAVEL PLANS CAN quickly become expensive, making budget vacations extremely desirable. But such trips aren't possible if you pay too much for airfare. And unless you know where to look, finding cheap flights can be a huge hassle. "For the airlines, it's about getting you to pay the most you're willing to pay, which is the opposite of what the consumer wants," says Joe Brancatelli, publisher of the travel website JoeSentMe.com. On a single flight, he adds, there can be more than a dozen pricing categories. "On a 150-seat plane, there could be 50 different prices," he says.
Any more time and you might want to consider a more unplanned trip that utilises budget airlines and cheap off-season one way tickets. It’s not unreasonable to be able to do an around the world trip using the buy-as-you-go method for half the price of a true RTW ticket.  And the freedom you get from having an unplanned itinerary is fun and liberating.
Let me be right up front.  Ticket reselling is not for everyone.  There is a risk of losing money and the potential for wasted time and frustration.  Also, you will find that some people (maybe even you!) simply view ticket reselling as some sort of horrible or inexcusable activity (“how dare you sell a ticket for more than face value you scalper!?!”).

At Texas A&M I was an ECON major, a sports nut, and gambling freak, so this ticket broker thing just about summed up every interest I had. My career did not begin at Texas A&M, though, but in New Jersey at Seton Hall University. I was in Grad School and I realized I was about 12 months away from having to find a real job. All throughout college I tried to get internships with various sports teams and I even worked for ABC Sports for a few years, but nothing fit. My ultimate career goal in life was to have my own businees but not have the type of business in which I had to work 100 hours a week.


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Buy tickets early. If you're going to be using an online outlet to sell, you won't be doing yourself any services if you wait to strike. Keep your eye out for presales and wide-release sale dates.[2] The sooner you buy tickets, the better tickets you'll have at your disposal. Better tickets will maximize the likelihood of being to sell them off to a potential customer.
Although it is arguably quite tough to save up enough miles to get a free flight, using the miles that you've accumulated to offset ticket prices or upgrade seats can still help you save some serious money. Taking advantage of the bonus offers you get when you sign up for top travel credit cards is definitely the easiest way to collect enough miles for 100% free flights.
The price of domestic flights were, on average, 11 percent lower on Sunday than the average for all other days. The Sunday bargains were even greater on flights from the U.S. to Europe, with tickets averaging 16 percent lower when compared with other days. And flights within Europe averaged a whopping 30 percent less on Sundays, making it an ideal day to book several legs of a multicity tour.

The professional ticket scalpers you encounter in the parking lot are brokers or middlemen looking to capitalize on an arbitrage opportunity. Arbitrage is the practice of taking advantage of a price difference between two markets. In scalping, it’s the difference between what a fan looking to unload an extra ticket asks for versus the price you, a fan without a ticket, will pay to get into the arena.  
And the third sort of interesting thing is that demand comes in waves. So when tickets go on sale, there’s a lot of demand initially, but there’s also more demand over time. So, for instance, in the music market, the sort of rule of thumb is whatever you sell in the first five days, you double that, and that’s going to be your total attendance. So there’s this disconnect between selling and when the demand arrives. So a lot of times people just speculate and buy tickets, and they buy it up when tickets go on sale and later sell them to people who want tickets at a later date.
My husband and I are flying from San Francisco to Paris on August 31 and returning October 4. In the last several months, ticket prices have risen from $1400 – $1700 for economy seats. We fly every year and never pay anywhere near this for this much. Do you have any advice as to when we should book? We’d rather fly nonstop, but could do it with one short layover.
Choose a strategy that suites you and your trading hours. Write it on paper and stick to it. With time you will perfect it but at the beginning this will help you be disciplined to stick to rules. Ensure that the trading strategy you adopt at the beginning of your scalping or spread betting career has a high probability and positive expectancy. Even if at the beginning this means more sitting on the side lines, well being more patient and taking fewer trades. If you trade in the evening you might end up trading only 3 to 4 times.

You need to use more than one flight search engine for every flight search. Two of my favorites are Google Flights and Momondo. They are both extremely to use and consistently find some of the lowest prices. Google Flights will comb through the listings directly from the airline websites, although they will also list the prices of a few third-party booking sites as well.
Let me be right up front.  Ticket reselling is not for everyone.  There is a risk of losing money and the potential for wasted time and frustration.  Also, you will find that some people (maybe even you!) simply view ticket reselling as some sort of horrible or inexcusable activity (“how dare you sell a ticket for more than face value you scalper!?!”).

I’m an oddity in the miles/points game. I’ve been in it a few years now and I still don’t have a business card! I don’t mind flying any alliance though at the moment I am an elite for a skyteam airline… and I don’t have any hotel loyalty. Anyways, the only time I resell on stubhub is whenever I have to fulfill a minimum spend for the bonus points (most of the time it ranges $1500-$3000 for a period of 3 months) but I really utilized my reselling skills a year ago when I had to meet $10k minimum spends for the the citi AAexec cards!
A mistake fare—like dropping a zero so a $1,540 round-trip flight suddenly costs just $154—usually comes from human error. Sometimes, it means the same price is available from nearly every departure city—like $500 round-trip from the entire U.S. to Australia. (In our dreams!) There are three things to know about mistake fares: They're rare, fleeting, and, most importantly, don't have to be honored. If truly an accident, the airline can backpedal, cancel your ticket, and refund you. So if you see a wildly inexpensive fare on one of the deal sites, book it ASAP—they usually only last a few hours, max—and hold off on reserving any additional activities or accommodation until you have a ticket number or booking reference from the airline. (It can take up to a week.) Once you're a confirmed passenger, go wild.
When it comes to some things in life -like Coachella tickets and restaurant reservations on Valentine’s day- it pays to book early. The same can’t always be said for booking flights. Flash sales or low booking rates can drop airfare prices as your travel date approaches. Be careful though- waiting too long can cost you big time too. Studies show the sweet spot is around 6 weeks before your domestic travel dates or 12 weeks before international travel dates. Everything else aside be prepared to book a ticket to one of your bucket list destinations on a whim when you hear of a sale!

Airlines play games with airfares -- sometimes, it seems, merely to annoy their competitors. If you check a New York to Seattle fare before going to bed one night it might be $228 round-trip, but check at 8am the following day and it could be $108. But that sneak sale, which could be valid for travel up to 330 days in the future, will probably last only a few hours, and seats will sell quickly. And for reasons that we can only speculate on, airlines lower fares on Saturday mornings and during the weekend (this is also when those "fat finger" airfare mistakes seem to happen). The aforementioned peak summer deals on Virgin to London popped up on a Saturday afternoon, and those now famous 88¢ USAir round-trips on a Saturday morning.
While most business (and frequent) travelers feel good about doing their part by booking the lowest possible fare, they may be doing themselves and their company a disservice. The first disservice would be to themselves because the lowest fares often do not give the most elite qualifying points for their frequent flyer program. In fact, some of the lowest fares may not qualify for frequent flyer miles at all, depending on a flight's specific route.

StubHub tries to say that it is a 15% seller fee and 10% buyer fee, but since all buyers see the final price, the reality is that the full burden effectively falls on the seller.  But selling via StubHub is very easy, safe, and efficient.  So if you have enough profit potential in your tickets, you can still do well selling at StubHub despite the fees.
Don’t go lugging an oversized suitcase filled with a whole semester’s worth of clothes (or weird contraband) through TSA, but if you’ve got a small- or medium-sized bag you’re willing to part with for a few hours, taking it to the gate and volunteering to gate check it can save you a bag fee. It also earns you goodwill with the flight crew, as you appear to be sacrificing something for the good of the plane, even though you’re just being cheap. Of course, this doesn’t apply to airlines that charge for carry-ons to begin with, and you’re probably out of luck (meaning, there’d be an administrative fee of around $50) if you’re flying Economy Plus on a legacy carrier, too. 
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