Don’t expect the gate agent to scour the interwebs to find you a seat, though. There are likely 100 other people trying to get out as well, so if you make their job fast and easy you’ll get better results. Look up the flights you want, calmly stroll up to the counter with two or three options ready, and see if they can do anything for you. If those options include flights on their airline, all the better.
Ok.. So there’s this guy on our local swap and shop on Facebook, claiming to sell Disney on ice tickets for $140 for 4 tickets when they should be about $250 or more and he’s flaked out on me before getting these tickets, now he’s saying he has the tickets but I’m scared there fakes.. How can I spot them out before j give him my money and get to PNC arena and have 2 very upset kids and a pissed off husband for wasting his money.. HELP!!

Whether sports or events, a key factor is buying tickets that stand out or are different in some way. You’re right on about being as careful and aware as possible about supply factors, such as promoters discounting tickets or announcing additional showings/concerts. You also make a very good and fair point about having capital tied up in inventory.
Few products are so underpriced that an entire subsidiary industry exists to take advantage of the discrepancy. When there is excess demand for a new car or phone, some people might sell theirs at a markup on eBay, but there’s nobody across the street from the dealership or Best Buy offering it right away for double the sticker price; there certainly isn’t an entire corporation built on exploiting companies’ failure to properly price items initially. Yet concerts and sporting events consistently price their tickets low enough that street scalpers risk jail time to hawk marked-up tickets, and StubHub makes hundreds of millions a year in revenue.
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They don't. Especially on international fares, one of these online travel agencies could have a fare several hundred dollars less than or higher than another. Last April, Travelocity was selling seats to London on Virgin for $400-$470 round-trip, taxes included, from east and west coast cities, even for peak summer travel. Those fares were available on only Travelocity, not Orbitz or Expedia (they weren't even available on Virgin's own site). So check all the online agencies, including Cheapair.com, Hotwire, and Kayak, in addition to the ones already mentioned.
The investigation, whose findings experts say are indicative of ticketing practices nationwide, revealed that 54 percent of tickets are reserved for the artists, production companies, venues, promoters, radio stations, and presale customers such as fan club members or people who carry a particular credit card. Schneiderman’s probe found that when the remaining tickets are finally released to the general public, profiteering can be rampant.
Track your profits. While scalping tickets in person tends to be a casual affair, purchasing and reselling tickets online for profit is more of a business than anything. Because the logistics are easier, you can think more about it in terms of supply-and-demand, market value and probability. With that in mind, keeping a spreadsheet of your profits and losses is essential for success in the long run.[10]
The other primary option for selling tickets is Craigslist. It is an amazing place for buyers and sellers to meet, but also a world fraught with potential scams and frustrations.  I can’t possibly get into all of the details of buying and selling on Craigslist here, but I’ll pass along a few key details.  Of course, the biggest benefit of selling via Craigslist is that there are no fees.  The downside is that you must interact with people.  And those people are always looking for a deal and usually horrible at communicating.
Don’t expect the gate agent to scour the interwebs to find you a seat, though. There are likely 100 other people trying to get out as well, so if you make their job fast and easy you’ll get better results. Look up the flights you want, calmly stroll up to the counter with two or three options ready, and see if they can do anything for you. If those options include flights on their airline, all the better.

This list wouldn't be complete without the mention of social media. The best way to stay on top of the latest in just about anything these days is social media. Find out what the best deals are right now in real time by following your preferred airlines on social media. Additionally, following #airfare on Twitter will provide you with the latest in flight deals from all of the major airlines and airfare sites.
The price of domestic flights were, on average, 11 percent lower on Sunday than the average for all other days. The Sunday bargains were even greater on flights from the U.S. to Europe, with tickets averaging 16 percent lower when compared with other days. And flights within Europe averaged a whopping 30 percent less on Sundays, making it an ideal day to book several legs of a multicity tour. 

And the first is, there’s just a great deal of uncertainty when a ticket price is set, whether it’s for a baseball game that the Red Sox are doing well or not, or even a rock concert. The Rolling Stones can be very hot in some cities and not so hot in other cities. And so one of the key reasons is due to this uncertainty, many sports teams and musicians tend to be conservative, and set a low price. The second key reason is there’s generally a hesitancy to set prices too high, because there’s a brand or goodwill associated with these entities, and they don’t want to set prices too high to damage that.
Some sites offer the option to purchase a discounted ticket without knowing full details about your airline and flight times. For example, Priceline allows you to suggest a price for your itinerary if you're flexible about your airline and flight schedule. Hotwire offers discount "hot rates" that provide details of your airline and flight time after you have purchased the ticket. Just keep in mind that you're just as likely to stumble upon deals on the airlines' own websites — particularly if you sign up for their email alerts.

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At Texas A&M I was an ECON major, a sports nut, and gambling freak, so this ticket broker thing just about summed up every interest I had. My career did not begin at Texas A&M, though, but in New Jersey at Seton Hall University. I was in Grad School and I realized I was about 12 months away from having to find a real job. All throughout college I tried to get internships with various sports teams and I even worked for ABC Sports for a few years, but nothing fit. My ultimate career goal in life was to have my own businees but not have the type of business in which I had to work 100 hours a week.
Timing is everything. You may be tempted to wait for the weekend to sit down and book your dream getaway, but experts say that flight prices are actually lowest on Tuesday afternoons when all the major airlines post their pricing updates for the coming week and before they can edit them to match their competitors rates. A tool like Google Flights and their price tracker can help greatly when searching prices on Tuesday afternoons!
[…] Over time I have tried to cover just about every type of manufactured spending on this blog. I don’t advocate all methods for all people, however I do think it is good to diversify your knowledge so you can jump on the best deals. For that reason I have covered gift card reselling, traditional MS and PDX Deals Guy even wrote about ticket reselling. […]
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At this point in time nearly 100% of my inventory is sports tickets. I have been a broker for about 8 years now and the financial freedom and flexibility it gives me is amazing. The only downside is that it is not a very social job, and you don’t feel you are contributing too much to society, so that is why I also have a part time job and volunteer during the down time. Overall, I can say I am happy with my career choice and plan on being involved with tickets in some sort of capacity the rest of my life.

Sounds funny how it is your vocation yet you say it’s a bad idea for people to do the same thing you do. I’m sure we’re all adults here and any intelligent person will know there are risks and research further. You’re never going to stop the idiots from making a mess of their life even with good advice. I do agree though, that there are more safe ways to MS. I think the blogger isn’t promoting this as the only or best way.

My husband and I are big concert goers and we are are always buying tickets. We have recently had our first child and are now realizing that we won’t always be able to make it to the concerts we buy tickets for. Because of this, we have been looking for concert ticket services, or other ways that we can re sell some of our tickets. I didn’t realize it was illegal to use certain third parties, I will have to keep doing research on what our best options will be.


Writer, Editor, and Photography enthusiast, Ana Pereira is a California native, who left the corporate world to get out and explore the world. Recently, she spent several months exploring Africa and South Asia. Her goal is to explore Earth's farthest and deepest corners, with cultures and landscapes far different from her own. She spends most of her "down-time" out in the wilderness, climbing, hiking, and beyond, and is feverishly passionate about travel and health. Check her out on her blog or Instagram.


How far in advance should I book flights? – The best time to buy a ticket for flights within North America is 60 days in advance. For international travel to Asia and the South Pacific the best time to buy is 5 months in advance. For flights between North America and Europe the best time is 6 months in advance. And for flights within Europe the best time to buy is as soon as the tickets become available (usually 6 to 10 months in advance).
Don't travel at peak times, which means not flying on the Sunday after Thanksgiving or any other time when seats are coveted. Consider starting a summer trip before school is out. Visit Europebefore May and after summer vacations. Be aware, however, that a tidal wave of boomers is expected to flood Europe in the fall, so don't count on bargain transatlantic flights at that time of year. 
Buy tickets early. If you're going to be using an online outlet to sell, you won't be doing yourself any services if you wait to strike. Keep your eye out for presales and wide-release sale dates.[2] The sooner you buy tickets, the better tickets you'll have at your disposal. Better tickets will maximize the likelihood of being to sell them off to a potential customer.
Reservation systems at airlines and travel sites sell tickets at the same price to all the fliers on one reservation. If you’re buying airfare for your family of four, for example, it does not matter if the airline has three seats for sale in a lower price category and the fourth at a higher one. “All the travelers under the reservation will automatically get the higher price, and you won’t know that there are cheaper tickets available,” Mr. Seaney said.
If it looks like the delay is going to cost you more than the airline is offering -- like if you had a non-refundable hotel reservation, or miss a private helicopter ride (look at you!) -- you’ve got 30 days to try and get as much money out of them as you can. But once you put a check into your bank account, you’ve essentially agreed to accept whatever you were offered.

One time I bought lower bowl center court just one ticket since my friends already had 3 tickets for themselves and I tagged along last minute. I bought for $40 from a scalper. I get to the lady telling you where your seat is at near center court and she looks up at me and says,"This ticket says your disabled!" I immediate grabbed the railing fallin to one knee yelling aloud,"Ooohhhh my leg, it hurts, get me to a seat quick" as everyone in the vicinity just died laughing including the ticket lady. She gave me a good seat for the game.
When you use reward miles to pay for a last-minute award flight, it's not uncommon for the airline to charge a "close-in" fee. One of the few airlines to not charge this fee is Delta. If you're a Medallion member, you can also enjoy free first class and premium seating upgrades for any unsold seats, which is a second way you can save money on airfare.

Unless you want to travel at the height of a peak travel season or over a holiday, you don't have to book months in advance.About one month from departure, prices tend to either drop or shoot up significantly, so you take some risk booking 6 to 8 weeks out, but you can also avoid paying more should fares go up 4 weeks from departure. There's no specific best day of the week to book, but booking Tuesday through Thursday tends to help you avoid the weekend rush and find more deals. 

It's often cheaper to buy two fares rather than one. Let's say you're flying from New York to Eleuthera in the Bahamas. Check on one of the big sites like Expedia or Orbitz for a single fare (for example, JFK to Governor's Harbor, Bahamas) and then do two separate searches (JFK to Nassau and Nassau to Governor's Harbor). Chances are the two-fare strategy will save you a lot of cash. This fare trick also works for flights to Europe (fly into London or Manchester, UK on one fare and then hop on a discount European airline to reach your final destination) and Asia. To search route possibilities on these discounters, check out the Airfarewatchdog route maps page.

As Steven Wandrey mentioned, “CoT isn’t verified but if someone has good rep ratings on there the chances are much higher than not that the tickets are legit.” That said, Stubhub doesn’t verify ticket sales either (but the buyer does have a credit card on file), and CashorTrade.org will assist you if any problems arise. Using CashorTrade.org can save you money compared to using the mighty corporate behemoth StubHub.
To help, the CAA (Civil Aviation Authority) website has a useful airline charges comparison table which shows extra fees for a host of big airlines, as well as luggage allowances, seat selection charges and even whether a meal's included with your ticket. While you should always double-check these with the airline before you book, it's handy to see the real cost of your ticket so you can make a more accurate comparison.
Thankfully, there are plenty of ways to save money on flights and lodging that don’t involve eschewing them altogether—life hacks I didn’t even realize existed until I began reporting this story. Like, did you know you can download apps that will alert you the moment the price goes down on that flight you had your eye on? Or that hotels will often offer you better deals on rooms you’ve already booked if you find that room available for a cheaper price after the fact on some other site? The list goes on. And here it is:
Airline rewards programs are a great way to get free flights, free upgrades, and free companion tickets. No matter how often you fly, you should be signed up for the airline’s reward program. I stick to US-based airlines since they are involved in all the major alliances and you can earn miles on their partner flights. For example, if I fly Singapore Airlines, I can earn United Airlines miles because they are partners. Likewise, if I fly Air France, it’s credited to my Delta rewards account.
Southwest Airlines’ Rapid Rewards: Southwest's rewards program is strong, especially if you make frequent domestic trips. Your reward comes from dollars spent, based on fare class—that's six points per dollar on "Wanna Get Away" tickets; 10 points per dollar on "Anytime" tickets; and 12 points per dollar on "Business Select” tickets. When it comes to redeeming there are no blackout dates, not even holidays, and no change fees or cancellation fees, either.
Brilliant advice, although people should make sure if they are using multiple airlines ticketed separately that they have good travel insurance. Airlines ticketed separately have no obligation if, say, the first flight is delayed and you miss your second flight. I have also had issues with lost luggage before, when airline one booked it straight through when I was ticketed separately on to airline two: both point the finger at the other and you don’t get anywhere fast! Good insurance is a must and good practice anyway!
You can sign up for an airline rewards card that earns points with a particular airline, or a more general travel rewards card that lets you redeem points across a variety of airlines. As a beginner card, we recommend the Chase Sapphire Preferred. The annual fee is waived for the first year, and you can earn up to 50,000 in bonus points after spending $4,000 in the first 3 months after your account opening. That’s worth $625 when redeemed through Chase Ultimate Rewards, and more than enough for a domestic flight. You can compare this card with other top credit cards.

Online travel agencies, such as Kayak, Travelocity and Orbitz, have made the search for inexpensive airfare easier than ever. Perhaps because of that, many travelers begin and end their search for airfares with one of these sites. Yet there is more a traveler can do to find moderately priced airfares with fewer stops and/or better timing; stopping after the initial search means missing out on these opportunities.


This flight search option is legal, but, there is a catch. You book a fare with a connecting flight and hop off at the connecting airport instead of continuing to the final destination instead of booking a more expensive direct flight. Since the airlines might not appreciate this gesture, be sure you don't check a bag or link your loyalty rewards number. Skiplagged is probably the best site to engage in this endeavor.
Nevertheless, it is entirely up to you whether you prefer to splash out on regular air tickets or put in the effort to score some of the amazing deals out there! But even if you're a very busy person and don't feel the savings are worth your time, you can still use a concierge service like those you get with good credit cards to do all the grueling work for you. You can never be too rich to save money.
This is your first step, and it’s probably the most important. Ticket brokering can be fun and extremely lucrative, but it’s not for everyone. There are a lot of unpredictables, a lot of tough decisions, and a ton of organizational work that goes into this business. If you’re just learning about ticket brokering and you need an introduction on how it all works, this is not the career where you can simply “learn on the job.” What will end up happening is you’ll buy thousands of dollars worth of tickets that you can’t sell and you’ll just get discouraged.
Airfare and lodging costs can be the difference between a cheap trip and an expensive one. As my friends and I are still relatively young with little expendable income to spare, our collective trip planning usually involves the following questions: “Can we drive there?” and “Do we have somewhere free to stay?” As a result, most of our trips take us to nearby cities where friends and acquaintances live—which is an effective solution, but one that involves many visits to Pennsylvania and Connecticut and little else.
Copying ultra-low-cost airlines such as Spirit and Frontier, now Delta, American and United also sell bare-bones economy class fares. On domestic routes, they typically cost $40-$60 round-trip less than regular economy, although the savings can be greater to international destinations. Buy one of these fares and, except on Delta, you'll pay even for a carry-on bag unless it's small enough to fit under the seat in front of you; you won't be able to choose a specific seat before check-in (which means you'll end up in a dreaded middle seat), and your fare will be entirely non-refundable and non-changeable. Although I'd never buy one of these airfares, my millennial friends, who apparently travel with just a change of clothes and a toothbrush stuffed into a backpack that slides under the seat, tell me that they're worth the inconvenience.
I’m Patrick, traveller, explorer, writer and photographer in chief here at Adventographer. Growing up with a healthy appetite for adventure on the west coast of Canada helped me shake the mindset that I needed material things and encouraged me to make travel a priority in my life. I write from a wealth of travel experiences both good and bad and endeavor to create & share amazing, inspiring content from around the world as a catalyst for change. Come along with me as I Explore/Create/Educate!
We traveled on Air New Zealand from SFO to BNE and return from SYD, with premium economy space seats, outbound September and return October. Price was USD 3935 for 2 persons, purchased June. Now price per person for similar flight Sept 2016 seems to be 50% greater, USD 3,000. I would appreciate any comment you have as to this increase and later pricing. Thanks. David Anderson
Few products are so underpriced that an entire subsidiary industry exists to take advantage of the discrepancy. When there is excess demand for a new car or phone, some people might sell theirs at a markup on eBay, but there’s nobody across the street from the dealership or Best Buy offering it right away for double the sticker price; there certainly isn’t an entire corporation built on exploiting companies’ failure to properly price items initially. Yet concerts and sporting events consistently price their tickets low enough that street scalpers risk jail time to hawk marked-up tickets, and StubHub makes hundreds of millions a year in revenue.
This doesn’t seem to bother fans. Barry Arakelian told me that he had a great time at the Petty show, regardless of the fact that he paid $825 to see a show that should have cost about $200. He would have paid even more, he said, if he knew the money was going to an artist he admired. “And if I paid the higher price,” he said proudly, “you’d shut out the scalpers.”
When buying tickets in ebay, there are many things that one should look out for. Anyone can run an ebay auction, but if you are going to buy tickets, such as a concert ticket, on ebay then you will need to make sure that it is from a reputable seller. The way to do this is to check their member profile rating. This will allow you to view how many good ticket transactions they have had, as well as if anyone suggests that the seller ripped them off. If a seller has more than a year of expereince selling at least 100 tickets on ebay and has had no complaints of any being fake, then you should feel comfortble buying tickets through them.
They don't. Especially on international fares, one of these online travel agencies could have a fare several hundred dollars less than or higher than another. Last April, Travelocity was selling seats to London on Virgin for $400-$470 round-trip, taxes included, from east and west coast cities, even for peak summer travel. Those fares were available on only Travelocity, not Orbitz or Expedia (they weren't even available on Virgin's own site). So check all the online agencies, including Cheapair.com, Hotwire, and Kayak, in addition to the ones already mentioned.
If it's happened to you, contact the airline or booking site straight away to see if you can get it amended (see How to Complain for help). Let them know it's a known fault others have reported too. Yet sadly you've few rights if the airline refuses to correct it, as it'd be difficult to prove it's their error, and it may charge you fees to amend or cancel.

One danger you face by buying from scalpers is that you may be getting counterfeit or bogus tickets. That danger is even greater today as a ticket holder can sell a “hard copy” ticket on Stubhub by entering the bar code number. The person who buys the ticket gets an email with a new bar code that they use to get into the game. This leaves a perfectly legitimate looking hard copy ticket that can be resold to an unsuspecting fan just outside the arena.  
What you need in order to score premium seats consistently is a systematic approach to purchasing tickets and the right infrastructure to get the job done. All this will come with enough experience combined with trial and error. There is no holy grail—just perseverance and know-how. The book mentioned above offers some excellent techniques and insights on pulling tickets that the average fan will probably not have thought of.
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