Leveraging the advantages of blockchain technology for event ticketing, crypto.tickets developers have been able to engineer an entire eco-system for event promoters and ticket vendors where all the rules for primary and secondary ticket sales / resales, exchanges, returns, as well as payments, fees, and commissions throughout the entire ticket lifecycle up to the redemption at the door can be specified by event organisers in smart-contracts registered on the blockchain, providing a powerful means of eliminating ticket scalpers and touts out of the equation.
In a world filled with more options than ever, it's your job as a consumer to stay informed. Luckily, the businesses that want you to choose them have made it easier than ever to stay up to date. Whether you have a trip coming up soon, or simply know that you'll be planning a vacation sometime next year, take some time to prepare. When the time comes, you'll have all the information you need to get the best deal.
Airlines play games with airfares -- sometimes, it seems, merely to annoy their competitors. If you check a New York to Seattle fare before going to bed one night it might be $228 round-trip, but check at 8am the following day and it could be $108. But that sneak sale, which could be valid for travel up to 330 days in the future, will probably last only a few hours, and seats will sell quickly. And for reasons that we can only speculate on, airlines lower fares on Saturday mornings and during the weekend (this is also when those "fat finger" airfare mistakes seem to happen). The aforementioned peak summer deals on Virgin to London popped up on a Saturday afternoon, and those now famous 88¢ USAir round-trips on a Saturday morning.
Hi David, I’m looking to fly to Rome 5/28/18 to 6/4/18 from LAX. I’m currently looking at Norwegian Air’s direct flights — their lowest tier is about $850 and LowFare+ (with seat choice, checked bag, meals) is about $1k. The list of tips recommend I wait a few more weeks before buying but I was just wondering if you think it would still be a good idea to wait? Is it likely to drop in the next month? Thank you!
When you find an airline with the best fares for your needs, go directly to that airline's website and compare costs. Quite often you'll be offered the same fare you got through an aggregator, and occasionally it may even be lower. The benefits of booking directly through the airline include easier changes and cancellations, avoidance of third-party booking fees, and the possibility of compensation (on some airlines) should fares drop further.
This is pretty extreme but true. Ticketmaster tickets aren’t printed on normal paper, and if you light a small corner of a genuine ticket with a lighter or cigarette, it should turn black on the face but be completely unaffected on the back side. Also, Kevin Quandt pointed out that “most Ticketmaster tickets have a blueish layer of paper that is slightly visible, and that they are heat sensitive (also, best to not leave in hot car).”

Typically, I start all my searches with Momondo because it searches all major AND budget airlines, non-English websites, English websites, and everything in between. I’ve been using them since 2008 and they vet all the sites they link to as they have strict criteria on who the operate with. Momondo is one of the most comprehensive booking sites out there, they have the lowest price 99% of the time, and it’s the search engine all the other travel experts I know use too.
If you are going to fly when everyone is flying, then you’re ticket is going to cost more. Try to be flexible with your dates. If you are dead-set on visiting Paris, go to Paris in the spring or fall when fewer people visit and airfares are cheaper. But if you want to go in the middle of August? You’re out of luck. Hawaii over Christmas? Good luck!
We had really good seats in the 5th row but as we got closer to a game we couldn't attend we would negotiate a really good deal with someone vs them not getting used. We would snap a picture of the tickets and sometimes our account to let the buyer know we were legit. They could pay by paypal which most people have today. Then we would email them directly to the buyer from our ownership account so they knew they were the real deal.
[…] If tickets sell out, which is likely, fans can still buy them through another vendor. Browse resale tickets on a third-party site like StubHub or search Craigslist for fans looking to unload extra tickets. But be wary of scalpers with marked up prices and make sure you’re spending your money wisely by looking on Facebook fan groups for tickets, prioritizing physical tickets over PDFs and negotiating prices, according to Showbams.com. […]
While most airlines put a heavy surcharge on one-way tickets (often charging 80% of or sometimes the same price as a return), airlines such as Norwegian offer one-way tickets for roughly half the price of a return. This affects other airline’s prices, such as TAP Portugal and KLM, too. This means for trips to the US, particularly those when you might not know the exact date, or airport of your return, it makes sense to book a one-way ticket there, and another one back.
My first ticket purchase (for resell) was four tickets to a show for the Eagles in Hershey, Pennsylvania. I had no idea why I picked this event to resell, and I had no idea what I was doing. I set up my first sale as an auction on eBay and lost about $25 on the first pair of tickets. Thinking this business was for the birds I put up the remaining pair of seats a few weeks later and ended up making about $50. Hmmm….maybe there was something to this. Next, I bought some tickets tickets for U2 in Detroit, thinking that any seats anywhere would make money because it was U2! I bought about 16 tickets at $90/each and had to sell them for $50! Ugh. I never thought I could lose money on a U2 concert, but that day I learned how important market size, day of the week, number of shows, supply of tickets, etc. were to the true market value of an event. After losing about $700 I was crushed and figured I would never make any real money selling tickets, so I had to start thinking about finding a 9-5 job.
Though scalpers hid in the shadows when reselling tickets was illegal, today they could be anybody—an individual with some spare tickets, a small-time speculator looking to make a windfall, or a professional ticket broker. Although not long ago there were limits placed on ticket markups, resellers are now largely free to sell tickets at whatever prices consumers might pay—which can be quite a lot. The average markup on tickets offered for sale on the secondary market was 49 percent above face value, though the margins sometimes exceeded 1,000 percent, the New York probe found.
I just came across your post, very useful :-) for booking separate flights, I found a site called Tripcombi some weeks ago. I hadn’t bought with them yet, but I found a flight from Costa Rica to Amsterdam for $400 ($80 less than the one I already had). The downside? They don’t offer yet any kind of guarantee in case you miss a leg of the flight, but still worth checking it ;-)

Hey Matt, sounds like you’re having an absolute ball! I’m 16 and just got back from a three week trip in the USA, and I am planning a year-long trip across the world for when I complete school. After reading through all sorts on your website, you’ve inspired me to seriously consider living the lifestyle that you have. Travelling some-what long-term has always been in the books and you have definitely shown me that it isn’t impossible to do. For you accommodation, what do you mainly do? I am trying to look for ways to cut down on spending and just wondering if you have any recommendations for a first-time solo travel? (Which may turn into a life-time but let’s not get too far ahead of ourselves!)

If you still need to book the whole kit and kaboodle, a flight and hotel package can save you cash. Airlines and third-party booking sites all offer travel packages. Some of the best options are Costco Travel or through your airline or hotel loyalty program (i.e. Marriott Flights and Nights) so you can get some bonus points and book a cheap flight simultaneously.

Whether sports or events, a key factor is buying tickets that stand out or are different in some way. You’re right on about being as careful and aware as possible about supply factors, such as promoters discounting tickets or announcing additional showings/concerts. You also make a very good and fair point about having capital tied up in inventory.

Rarely ever do airline tickets get cheaper as your departure date approaches, especially if you need to fly on a certain date. Budget airlines typically offer low rates as a baseline price, and as these tickets sell, the remaining ones increase in cost. This is very typical in Europe and Australia. If you know when and where you’re going, don’t wait on an unknown sale. More often than not, your biggest savings come from booking far ahead when you can.
The internet has revolutionized the secondary market in event tickets. Stubhub, Craigslist and eBay offer relatively safe and easy ways to buy tickets to concerts and sporting events from people who have previously purchased those tickets directly from the box office. If you plan ahead, buying online is the way to go. But when you make a spur-of-the-minute decision to attend a concert or a game, then you’re going to have to deal with the shady-looking guys in the parking lot — the scalpers.
Companies who resell tickets are called ticket brokers. Some would argue they are scalpers, as well. However, reputable ticket brokers follow laws, register with the Better Business Bureau and National Association of Ticket Brokers, make you pay with a credit card and take steps to safeguard against fraud. So there is a difference between buying from a street scalper and an online "scalper," even if it hits your pocketbook the same way.

But by leaving money on the table, Springsteen and his ilk might be doing their fans an inadvertent disservice. Jared Smith, the president of Ticketmaster North America, told me that the artists who charge the least tend to see the most scalping. Springsteen and others have angrily denounced scalping at their shows, but their prices are guaranteeing the very existence of that secondary market, which has become ever more sophisticated over the years. Many scalpers now use computer programs to monopolize ticket buying when seats go on sale, which forces many fans to buy from resellers. One of the surest ways to eliminate scalping, Smith told me, is to charge a more accurate price in the first place.
Rarely ever do airline tickets get cheaper as your departure date approaches, especially if you need to fly on a certain date. Budget airlines typically offer low rates as a baseline price, and as these tickets sell, the remaining ones increase in cost. This is very typical in Europe and Australia. If you know when and where you’re going, don’t wait on an unknown sale. More often than not, your biggest savings come from booking far ahead when you can.
Why pay a fare at all when you can use your frequent flier miles? Although redeeming miles has gotten more difficult in recent years, it’s still a good option to consider, particularly if you’re booking early; airlines designate a limited number of seats on each flight as eligible for award travel, and these seats go quickly. Some credit cards can help you build up miles more quickly; see How to Choose the Best Travel Credit Card to learn more.

This list wouldn't be complete without the mention of social media. The best way to stay on top of the latest in just about anything these days is social media. Find out what the best deals are right now in real time by following your preferred airlines on social media. Additionally, following #airfare on Twitter will provide you with the latest in flight deals from all of the major airlines and airfare sites.
The simplest way to sell tickets is also not surprisingly the most expensive.  You are probably familiar with StubHub.com. Much like its parent company, eBay, it has become the de facto market leader in its space. This is both good and bad. The good news is that buyers know to look there and are generally confident to buy there, given its “Fan Protect” guarantee. Unfortunately, as a seller, you pay a steep ~25% to sell there.

I’m kind of a relative newbie to the points/miles hobby (just ask Shawn). My sorry little blog is truly an endeavor targeted at friends and family who would (sorry Shawn) never come to MtM (or even the pure “deals” websites). I haven’t done a conference of any sort, but I would love to go to Trevor’s ResellingDO. (Just too far away! come out West, Trevor!) Maybe someday I will expand on this brief introduction (and sure there’s many other folks far more experience than I am!), whether on this blog or at a conference. I’m glad you found it an interesting topic.
Hello. Nice article. Lots of great tips. I am going to be flying into Orlando in February, 2/11-2/18/2017 and have some concerns in the flight cost. Right now spirit is the cheapest well under $200 but all of the other airlines are well over $200. We want to stay as close to $200 as possible but DO NOT want to fly spirit. Do you think that the other airlines will be dropped down at least closer to $200 mark within the next month or so?
Your flight to Europe will likely be your biggest trip expense — it pays to be on your toes to get the best deal. And keep in mind that there's no such thing as a free lunch in the airline industry. (In fact, these days there's usually no lunch at all.) Before grabbing the cheapest ticket you can find, make sure it meets your travel needs with the best combination of schedule, economy, and convenience.
Almost all search engines, airlines, and OTAs allow you to sign up for price alerts. You simply enter your departure and destination cities and when ticket prices plunge, you’ll get an email immediately. You can even set-up your alert to notify you only when an airfare drops below a specific amount. A favorite among travelers is Kayak Alerts and Airfare Watchdog. 

Buy tickets early. If you're going to be using an online outlet to sell, you won't be doing yourself any services if you wait to strike. Keep your eye out for presales and wide-release sale dates.[2] The sooner you buy tickets, the better tickets you'll have at your disposal. Better tickets will maximize the likelihood of being to sell them off to a potential customer.
RAFI MOHAMMED: Well, you know, we can’t tell all the secrets, but I’m happy to share some of the key secrets. And it really comes down to uncertainty, and how you deal with uncertainty. And it’s been my experience that the closer you get to an event, whether it’s a rock concert or a sporting event, you see prices go down. And so obviously, if you’re taking a significant other, or celebrating a very important event, or going out with clients, you really don’t want to be sweating it out until the last second and hoping that prices are going to go down.
It looks like both scalpers and ticket brokers are here to stay because neither show any signs of slowing down. About 30 percent of concert tickets are sold on the second hand market, according to USA Today, who says scalpers and ticket brokers take in more than $1.5 billion a year reselling concert tickets. So make educated decisions when dealing with scalpers and ticket brokers.
If you already have a credit card, or if you are planning to open one in the near future, consider switching or starting with an airline rewards card. You’ll be able to rack up frequent flier points when you’re not flying and cash in on free flights and member discounts/benefits as you spend! Check out the great community at /r/Churning for ideas on how to up your points game!
Aim to buy higher quality tickets. Unlike selling online, you are probably not going to be able to sell to a large amount of buyers while scalping in person. Realistically, a dedicated scalper may only sell to a few parties in one night, so it's important to make those sales count with higher quality tickets. Buy your tickets early, and make sure the tickets themselves are part of a tier that's bound to sell out fast.
It's often cheaper to buy two fares rather than one. Let's say you're flying from New York to Eleuthera in the Bahamas. Check on one of the big sites like Expedia or Orbitz for a single fare (for example, JFK to Governor's Harbor, Bahamas) and then do two separate searches (JFK to Nassau and Nassau to Governor's Harbor). Chances are the two-fare strategy will save you a lot of cash. This fare trick also works for flights to Europe (fly into London or Manchester, UK on one fare and then hop on a discount European airline to reach your final destination) and Asia. To search route possibilities on these discounters, check out the Airfarewatchdog route maps page.

At Texas A&M I was an ECON major, a sports nut, and gambling freak, so this ticket broker thing just about summed up every interest I had. My career did not begin at Texas A&M, though, but in New Jersey at Seton Hall University. I was in Grad School and I realized I was about 12 months away from having to find a real job. All throughout college I tried to get internships with various sports teams and I even worked for ABC Sports for a few years, but nothing fit. My ultimate career goal in life was to have my own businees but not have the type of business in which I had to work 100 hours a week.

Nonstop flights, although convenient, are expensive. To save money, book a flight with at least one stop. Also, search for flight deals at airports close to your destination. Sometimes it's cheaper to fly into Oakland than San Francisco, say, or Newark instead of JFK. Of course, be sure to factor in any additional ground-transportation costs involved in reaching your final destination.


Here is a breakdown of how original sellers calculate the cost of face value tickets: face value tickets are the cost of the ticket, plus any service charge plus tax. This is all printed clearly on the ticket. Face value tickets are sold by the original ticket provider. When you buy tickets from a ticket broker or scalper, you will likely be buying them for more than face value so they can make a profit.
On your way to a game/tailgate/car park/on the highway, you'll probably hear people yelling "need tickets." He's not asking for one—he wants to sell them. More often than not, the tickets you buy are copies of an original ticket—which means that as soon as you get into the stadium, you're screwed. I've heard the story a number of times. It's not fun.

This is pretty extreme but true. Ticketmaster tickets aren’t printed on normal paper, and if you light a small corner of a genuine ticket with a lighter or cigarette, it should turn black on the face but be completely unaffected on the back side. Also, Kevin Quandt pointed out that “most Ticketmaster tickets have a blueish layer of paper that is slightly visible, and that they are heat sensitive (also, best to not leave in hot car).”
SARAH GREEN: So we’ve been talking about dynamic pricing across a range of industries, sports, music. You mentioned hotels. You mentioned airlines. And I think it has seeped even further, even more than we know, into other industries, especially since online shopping makes it pretty easy for online retailers to figure out what kind of shopper you are, and what you might be willing to pay. Is there any industry that you think if safe from dynamic pricing, or are we just going to be all getting different prices all the time in the future?
A couple of sites are better for flights to Europe than flights within Europe, and some nice features make their results easier to navigate. Expedia is easy to use and consistent at finding good fares. CheapoAir offers pricing tables for mixed-airline flights to and from Europe. Vayama specializes in international flights, with cheaper fares that might not show up elsewhere — but beware that its customer service doesn't have a stellar reputation for handling cancellations and changes. (For cheap flights within Europe, I prefer Skyscanner.)
The simplest way to sell tickets is also not surprisingly the most expensive.  You are probably familiar with StubHub.com. Much like its parent company, eBay, it has become the de facto market leader in its space. This is both good and bad. The good news is that buyers know to look there and are generally confident to buy there, given its “Fan Protect” guarantee. Unfortunately, as a seller, you pay a steep ~25% to sell there.
I strongly recommend buying what’s referred to as an open-jaw ticket. This means you arrive-at and depart-from different cities. For example fly New York to London on your outbound trip, but return Paris to New York on your inbound trip. You save time and money by not having to return to your arrival city (where you’ve already been). The main downside to this is that the very cheapest deals in the airline industry are often tied to the same city (e.g. a return Los Angeles-Hong Kong ticket) but excluding the very cheapest deals – which most people don’t get anyways – the cost of an open jaw ticket can be fairly similar to a more standard ticket. Be sure to check this out.
I never even considered the VPN bit. I’ve noticed a large difference between prices I can get here in South Africa and those a friend who lives in the States is able to get. It seems so unfair but it’s understandable. I think there’s actually a site that you can go to that gets you low prices by skipping middle layover routes, but cannot recall what it was called.
To give you an idea of how much the states differ in their laws, here is an example of what Florida and New York permit when it comes to the resale of tickets, according to eBay. In Florida you cannot sell or buy a ticket for higher than face value, including fees plus $1 for tickets to events taking place in the Sunshine State. In New York, you cannot sell or buy tickets that are more than face value, including fees plus 45 percent of the ticket price for venues that seat more than 6,000 people and face value including fees, plus 20 percent for smaller venues.

7. Research the going ticket rates: It's kind of like telling a student to brush up on reading and math. But Menard and others believe this advice is worth repeating. Study the secondary platforms where you'll buy and sell your tickets -- StubHub, eBay,Craigslist, RazorGator and the like. You need to know the ceiling and floor prices. They're the basis for doing solid business in cyberspace and in the parking lot. Clark Howard, author of Living Large in Lean Times (Avery Penguin $18), recommends SeatGeek.com, a one-stop shop to help buyers compare different vendors. While it's targeted at buyers, scalpers also can benefit from the information.
If your flight is canceled because of something the airline did (as opposed to the weather), they are required by law to feed you and put you up in a hotel. You also receive a full refund for a canceled flight within seven days. The EU has its own set of delay compensation guidelines as well, ranging from 250 euros for short flights delayed under three hours up to 600 euros for flights between EU and non-EU airports that originate in Europe. That means if your flight home to the US is delayed, you’re still entitled to compensation. These rules still apply for many European-held islands in the Caribbean, like Martinique and Guadeloupe.
Don’t search for or buy multiple tickets in a single purchase. Airlines always show the highest ticket price in a group of tickets. For example, if you are a family of four and searching for four seats, the airline will find four seats together and show your fare based on the highest ticket price. So if seat A is $200, seats B and C are $300, and seat D is $400, it will price those tickets as $400 each instead of adding up the individual ticket prices. Therefore, always search for tickets as a single person. Afterwards, in the checkout process, you can pick your seats so you and your family are sitting together.
New York State lawmakers in May renewed the current ticket-selling law, which expires annually; new pending legislation would stiffen civil penalties and impose criminal ones for bot usage. Meanwhile, there are two ticketing bills under consideration in the U.S. House of Representatives, which would prohibit the use of bots and give the Federal Trade Commission enforcement authority. With significant reform unlikely to happen soon, how do you avoid getting gouged on ticket prices the next time you want to go to a ball game or take in a show?
To help, the CAA (Civil Aviation Authority) website has a useful airline charges comparison table which shows extra fees for a host of big airlines, as well as luggage allowances, seat selection charges and even whether a meal's included with your ticket. While you should always double-check these with the airline before you book, it's handy to see the real cost of your ticket so you can make a more accurate comparison.
And the third sort of interesting thing is that demand comes in waves. So when tickets go on sale, there’s a lot of demand initially, but there’s also more demand over time. So, for instance, in the music market, the sort of rule of thumb is whatever you sell in the first five days, you double that, and that’s going to be your total attendance. So there’s this disconnect between selling and when the demand arrives. So a lot of times people just speculate and buy tickets, and they buy it up when tickets go on sale and later sell them to people who want tickets at a later date.
Editorial Disclosure: Any personal views and opinions expressed by the author in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of GET.com. The editorial content on this page is not provided by any of the companies mentioned, and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities. Opinions expressed here are author's alone, not those of the companies mentioned, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.
“And if you’re not sure where to go, use Skyscanner’s handy Map View feature to find the best-value destinations from your local airport. You can easily set filters to your travel month and for direct or indirect routes. Then it’s simply a matter of scrolling through the map and you’ll see the best value destinations – with some of the best bargains already highlighted for you.”
It is almost impossible for anyone involved in currency trading to have not heard of scalping indicators. But, if you are new to trading, scalping is a trading style that focuses on creating profits on very small price changes. Positions are entered and exited within a short time duration, which can be within minutes. This post is going to assume you already have an understanding of scalping and will focus on some of the indicators you could use to form a simple and successful scalping strategy.
I would look for a couple more days then buy as tickets generally don’t come down, they go up (though there can be exceptions over the short term). For the cheaper Monday fares I’d be more inclined to book soon. For the more expensive Sunday fares, you probably have less to lose as you’ve already lost the discount so waiting on those has at least the chance of a cut.
Our detailed how-to guide spells out how to find mistake fares easily on your own. Basically, AirFare Watchdog and Secret Flying are great resources to stalk for finding mistake and sale pricing as they conglomerate slashed ticket rates all in one spot. Another great approach is to search for flights for an entire month using Skyscanner (Tip #3 in this article). This will allow you to easily spot a significantly reduced fare against what’s displayed that month, and has twice helped us stumble on error fares ourselves.
5. Know your laws: There's no federal law against scalping, but you'll need to find out what's in play where you live. In New York, for instance, the state let its sky's-the-limit scalping permission lapse in June 2010. Now somewhat strict, but cloudy, rules supposedly govern both online and onsite transactions there. Whether the activity is being rigorously monitored is anyone's guess.
Copying ultra-low-cost airlines such as Spirit and Frontier, now Delta, American and United also sell bare-bones economy class fares. On domestic routes, they typically cost $40-$60 round-trip less than regular economy, although the savings can be greater to international destinations. Buy one of these fares and, except on Delta, you'll pay even for a carry-on bag unless it's small enough to fit under the seat in front of you; you won't be able to choose a specific seat before check-in (which means you'll end up in a dreaded middle seat), and your fare will be entirely non-refundable and non-changeable. Although I'd never buy one of these airfares, my millennial friends, who apparently travel with just a change of clothes and a toothbrush stuffed into a backpack that slides under the seat, tell me that they're worth the inconvenience.
Review your ticket information carefully when you book. Double-check your dates, times, destinations, baggage allowance, and exact spelling of your name. Confirm that the name on your reservation exactly matches the one on your passport, which can be an expensive hassle to correct later. Decline extras that you don't want (for example, premium seating — with an extra fee). On each page of the transaction, be sure that no boxes are checked unless you want them to be.

Review your ticket information carefully when you book. Double-check your dates, times, destinations, baggage allowance, and exact spelling of your name. Confirm that the name on your reservation exactly matches the one on your passport, which can be an expensive hassle to correct later. Decline extras that you don't want (for example, premium seating — with an extra fee). On each page of the transaction, be sure that no boxes are checked unless you want them to be.
But warning: You won’t be able to check any bags. Since you’re getting off the flight before it reaches its final destination, any checked bags would head to the next stop without you. You should also avoid using your frequent flyer account number; airlines frown upon this money-saving method, and might cancel your return flight if they discover you doing this.” —Mona Molayem
First of all when Scalping, it is important that you keep costs under control. Scalping is all about taking or giving small profits. If you start letting your costs run these could eat up your profits. What I mean by costs, is not being decisive or convinced on a certain about a trade and you enter a trade to quickly close it. In this situation you have paid the spread. These little costs can add up.
Increasingly, airlines are launching "private" sales, reserving their very best fares for their own sites. With the exception of Southwest (www.southwest.com), now the second largest carrier by passengers flown, most of the airlines that do this are smaller domestic airlines or large international carriers, but we've even seen Delta do it, and we're not talking here just about last-minute weekend fares. Air New Zealand, Aloha, Malaysia, Frontier, Qantas, Singapore, SAS, Spirit, and others are using this strategy. Alaska Airlines has almost-weekly 20 percent off sales that you won't find anywhere but Alaska's site (www.alaskaairlines.com). Niche carriers like USA3000 (www.usa3000.com) and Allegiant Air (www.allegiantair.com) usually don't share their fare data with third-party sites at all, and although USA3000 fares are included in Sidestep.com searches, that airline has frequent $10 off sales that are only valid only on its website.
Rarely ever do airline tickets get cheaper as your departure date approaches, especially if you need to fly on a certain date. Budget airlines typically offer low rates as a baseline price, and as these tickets sell, the remaining ones increase in cost. This is very typical in Europe and Australia. If you know when and where you’re going, don’t wait on an unknown sale. More often than not, your biggest savings come from booking far ahead when you can.
Hey Matt, sounds like you’re having an absolute ball! I’m 16 and just got back from a three week trip in the USA, and I am planning a year-long trip across the world for when I complete school. After reading through all sorts on your website, you’ve inspired me to seriously consider living the lifestyle that you have. Travelling some-what long-term has always been in the books and you have definitely shown me that it isn’t impossible to do. For you accommodation, what do you mainly do? I am trying to look for ways to cut down on spending and just wondering if you have any recommendations for a first-time solo travel? (Which may turn into a life-time but let’s not get too far ahead of ourselves!)
One of these sites is Jack's Flight Club* (JFC), which is independently run and sends its members email alerts with details of cheap flights. If you're flexible about when and where you go, this can be a good way to grab a bargain – its basic service is free, though right now we've blagged a free 30-day trial of its premium service which spots more deals.
Thanks, Joey, for sharing your perspective and experience. As I state in my very first paragraph of this blog, I know that some people are simply philosophically opposed to the entire concept of ticket reselling (I think I also mention the risk there too!!). I’m not saying it makes it right (or wrong), but the reality is that lots of people are reselling tickets and the genie is out of the bottle on the free market setting ticket prices.

Day in, day out, the airfare researchers at Airfarewatchdog.com (www.airfarewatchdog.com) use every method possible to find the lowest fare on any given route. What we've discovered from our years of playing fare detective is that instead of getting easier, the rules of the game keep changing and consumers really need to do their homework or they'll overpay. But if you follow our ten rules of low fare search, you'll have a fighting chance.
If buying from a scalper or show-goer, look at the tickets before you hand over your hard-earned cash. “Knowing what the ticket policy for an event is helps. Know how the tickets should look and what the event would consider an invalid ticket. Making sure all necessary barcodes are there and that none of them are repeating over multiple tickets.” [Christi Payeur]
Momondo primarily compares the prices of third-party booking sites, including some international ones you have probably never heard of before, to find the lowest price! Even though many airlines require you to book directly through their website to score the best deal (as they keep the best prices for themselves), these two search engines can help you find the best flight options as they access the metadata from each carrier so you can save time as well.

One of the reasons why Southwest doesn't offer its fares on online travel agents (OTAs) is important: Should your flight get canceled or you need to change or cancel your itinerary, all customer service will go through the OTA and not the airline you're flying. Big name OTAs—Expedia, Travelocity, Priceline, etc.— have been around long enough to have strong customer service that usually won't derail your trip. But be more cautious with OTAs you haven't heard of before—and read the fine print—as there may be heavy change fees involved that wouldn't apply if you booked directly with the airline. (The real time to use OTAs is when you have a complex or multi-destination itinerary, one that requires multiple airlines and would be impossible to book on one airline's site.)
But there are ways for the passengers to save on increasingly pricey air travel. You can do the obvious stuff, like book flights that are on a weekday, at an odd hour, or headed to a non-hub airport. You can be diligent in comparing prices through sites like Priceline and CheapAir. And then, of course, there's the well-worn Tuesday trick, which is, simply: Book your flights on a Tuesday. (Airlines typically release sales on Tuesdays, and then end up competing against each other to offer the most enticing price. It's a rare moment where the consumer actually wins, for a change, in this cutthroat market.)

Here is a breakdown of how original sellers calculate the cost of face value tickets: face value tickets are the cost of the ticket, plus any service charge plus tax. This is all printed clearly on the ticket. Face value tickets are sold by the original ticket provider. When you buy tickets from a ticket broker or scalper, you will likely be buying them for more than face value so they can make a profit.


Be loud. You don't exactly need to have a brilliant marketing scheme when it comes to scalping tickets, but you do need to make people aware that you're selling them. Be loud, and shout what you're selling. including the type and number of seats. You can repeat this information loudly. If there is a demand for what you're selling, people will eventually come up to you and ask.
Sounds funny how it is your vocation yet you say it’s a bad idea for people to do the same thing you do. I’m sure we’re all adults here and any intelligent person will know there are risks and research further. You’re never going to stop the idiots from making a mess of their life even with good advice. I do agree though, that there are more safe ways to MS. I think the blogger isn’t promoting this as the only or best way.
I just came across your post, very useful :-) for booking separate flights, I found a site called Tripcombi some weeks ago. I hadn’t bought with them yet, but I found a flight from Costa Rica to Amsterdam for $400 ($80 less than the one I already had). The downside? They don’t offer yet any kind of guarantee in case you miss a leg of the flight, but still worth checking it ;-) 

Be loud. You don't exactly need to have a brilliant marketing scheme when it comes to scalping tickets, but you do need to make people aware that you're selling them. Be loud, and shout what you're selling. including the type and number of seats. You can repeat this information loudly. If there is a demand for what you're selling, people will eventually come up to you and ask.

Getting a cheap flight is really about timing. Prices fluctuate heavily and often on all routes. Booking a flight today from London to Bali could cost £600, but tomorrow it could be £300 on the same airline. These unannounced sales – when an airline suddenly drops its prices – are triggered because airlines release tickets 11 months in advance and predict what percentage of tickets will be sold as time moves on. For example, after five months they may expect to have sold 30% of the tickets but if sales are not as high as anticipated, it will announce a flash sale. Prices will plummet (by up to 60% on occasions) for a few days until demand catches up.


Brilliant advice, although people should make sure if they are using multiple airlines ticketed separately that they have good travel insurance. Airlines ticketed separately have no obligation if, say, the first flight is delayed and you miss your second flight. I have also had issues with lost luggage before, when airline one booked it straight through when I was ticketed separately on to airline two: both point the finger at the other and you don’t get anywhere fast! Good insurance is a must and good practice anyway!
Sign up for low-fare alerts. Many airfare search sites — as well as the official airline sites — will email and tweet automated updates about low fares for specific routes. Or check out AirfareWatchdog, a free service that does a particularly good job of finding the cheapest fares across multiple airlines (including those that don't show up on most search sites), and limits their alerts to flights that actually have seats available. A similar site called FareCompare tweets alerts specific to your home airport.

What you need in order to score premium seats consistently is a systematic approach to purchasing tickets and the right infrastructure to get the job done. All this will come with enough experience combined with trial and error. There is no holy grail—just perseverance and know-how. The book mentioned above offers some excellent techniques and insights on pulling tickets that the average fan will probably not have thought of.

Choose a suitable price.[3] There is much debate as to how much a scalper should charge for an upmarked event ticket. Ultimately, it depends on the original price, quality of seat, and predicted demand for the ticket in question. Generally speaking, if a show has sold out, it becomes a seller's market. Many professional scalpers tend to upmark resold tickets by 50%.[4]
Moreover, it’s always cheaper to fly during the middle of the week than on a weekend, because most people travel on the weekends and airlines hike their prices then. Prices are also cheaper if you fly after a major holiday as are early-morning or late-night flights are cheaper because fewer people want to travel then (who wants to wake up early?!).
The Simple Moving Average is first on the list of scalping indicator that can be used to create a very simple strategy. The simple moving average shows the average price over a specific time period allowing you to know if the price is going up or down, thus identifying a trend. So for example, if you wanted to plot the 7 period on a 10-minute chart, you would add all the closing prices of the last 70 minutes and divide that number by 7.  If you want to learn how to calculate simple moving averages and other types of moving averages check out this post.
Rarely ever do airline tickets get cheaper as your departure date approaches, especially if you need to fly on a certain date. Budget airlines typically offer low rates as a baseline price, and as these tickets sell, the remaining ones increase in cost. This is very typical in Europe and Australia. If you know when and where you’re going, don’t wait on an unknown sale. More often than not, your biggest savings come from booking far ahead when you can.
Of course, not all events have the white-hot appeal of an Adele concert, the Broadway musical “Hamilton,” or the Super Bowl. But consumers often face frustration trying to get reasonably priced seats even for less hyped concerts and shows because only 46 percent of all tickets are ever made available to the general public, according to a recent investigation of New York’s ticketing industry by State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman.
If it's happened to you, contact the airline or booking site straight away to see if you can get it amended (see How to Complain for help). Let them know it's a known fault others have reported too. Yet sadly you've few rights if the airline refuses to correct it, as it'd be difficult to prove it's their error, and it may charge you fees to amend or cancel.
You’re right. That does seem high. However, tickets between now and June generally increase in price not decrease – so (on average) you’ll probably do worse the longer you wait. I would do a search every few days for the next 2 or 3 weeks and if you don’t see the price drop then you’re sort of forced to buy. (Unless the trip is optional in which case you could wait and just not buy if they don’t come down.)
Who likes ticket scalpers? Pose that question to a room full of average Joe’s and the showing of hands will be few. Call them mean, sharks, cheaters, or the lowest of the low, the reality is, they have little issue with their reputation. And name calling will not get you the tickets they have for the event you want to see. The fact is, most scalpers are very shrewd business people with excellent negotiating skills. Like a stock broker they buy low and sell high. So here is a quick list of five do’s and don’ts when seeking to buy tickets from a street scalper (in places where such activity is legal, of course!).

If you’re traveling within the United States, flying on a Tuesday, Wednesday or Saturday will get you the lowest airfare because there are fewer fliers on these days, Mr. Seaney said. “You can save between 10 and 40 percent per ticket, if not more, compared to a Monday, Friday and Sunday, when air traffic is heavier,” he said. (Thursday falls between the two categories.)

Brilliant advice, although people should make sure if they are using multiple airlines ticketed separately that they have good travel insurance. Airlines ticketed separately have no obligation if, say, the first flight is delayed and you miss your second flight. I have also had issues with lost luggage before, when airline one booked it straight through when I was ticketed separately on to airline two: both point the finger at the other and you don’t get anywhere fast! Good insurance is a must and good practice anyway!

Once you find the 'error fare', you must quickly decide whether to buy it or not. Often, it happens that they eliminate the error within a few hours. Also, this kind of information is spreading around very quickly, so the key is to react promptly and never ever call the airline to obtain a confirmation of whether the price is valid. Of course they will say no and correct the mistake in the very next minute.


It's often cheaper to buy two fares rather than one. Let's say you're flying from New York to Eleuthera in the Bahamas. Check on one of the big sites like Expedia or Orbitz for a single fare (for example, JFK to Governor's Harbor, Bahamas) and then do two separate searches (JFK to Nassau and Nassau to Governor's Harbor). Chances are the two-fare strategy will save you a lot of cash. This fare trick also works for flights to Europe (fly into London or Manchester, UK on one fare and then hop on a discount European airline to reach your final destination) and Asia. To search route possibilities on these discounters, check out the Airfarewatchdog route maps page.
“Hostelworld.com is my go-to site for finding somewhere to stay. It has a huge inventory of hostels, bed and breakfasts, and hotels, giving travelers tons of affordable options to choose from. The site also includes reviews from other travelers, so you can see which options are the safest, cleanest, and most welcoming.” —Trang Pham-Nguyen, 29, a travel blogger who used to live abroad and now takes full advantage of her vacation days

Before you get started, it’s critical that you secure at least $5-10k in startup capital to give you a nice cushion when you’re first learning the ropes. Rest assured, mistakes will be made and money will be lost at the very beginning. The last thing you need is to fall behind on your monthly bills just because you’re waiting on someone to snatch up tickets that you’ve listed. Instead, make sure you have ample cash reserves to fund your venture from Day 1.

"Cheap" is always relative, depending on your budget and needs, but we have a few guidelines in the Traveler office for what counts as a good deal from the U.S. Flights to Europe at or under $400 round-trip are a go. Getting to Northern Africa for less than $500 is a steal. Round-trips to South America at or under $500 are also great, a number that applies to flights to Asia, too. Going farther afield, anything under $1,000 is a stellar deal for southern Africa, Australia, and New Zealand. That said, if you see a flight that's cheap enough to make you want to book, go for it. The "grass is greener, flight is cheaper" mentality of waiting for the least expensive flight will make you miss out on some great (and yes, cheap) flights.

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