As their nickname suggests, discount airlines can save you a bundle, but they’re not always easy to find. Luckily for consumers, discounters are cropping up more frequently on aggregators and booking sites (Kayak now offers fares for JetBlue and Spirit, for example) — but there are still a few holdouts, such as Southwest and Allegiant Air, whose fares can’t be found anywhere but their own websites. If you’re traveling outside the U.S., don’t forget to check the international discount airlines as well.

Unless you’ve got a no-brainer on your hands like front row seats to Justin Bieber concert or you were able to somehow land Super Bowl, it’s best to start with relatively inexpensive tickets and work your way up to the larger events. Even with a good amount of experience doing mock pulls, you’ll inevitably make mistakes at the start and you don’t want them to set you too far back right out of the gate. What you want to do is ease into it and only buy tickets that you are very confident you’ll be able to sell for a decent sized profit.
So let’s go back to the San Francisco Giants. If they have an experimental section and they drop the price, why would I buy a ticket in the next section over that’s at a much higher price? So if I were going to buy that ticket, I would say, well, gee, I can save $10 by going to the experimental section. Why not? So my hunch is that there was a lot of cannibalization going on, and that 20% figure really didn’t represent new revenue, getting people price sensitive, in the door. My hunch is that the majority of this increased 20% came from people who would have actually paid a higher price. That’s a negative of dynamic pricing that I don’t think has been satisfactorily accounted for.
Comparison-shop "air plus hotel" promotional deals. Some airfare aggregators and airlines offer "getaway" deals. For one low price, you get a round-trip flight to a European city as well as a few nights' lodging. Given Europe's high accommodation costs — especially in big cities — these can be a good value, though you can expect to be put up in a soulless business hotel.
Scalping tickets refers to the advance purchase and resale of tickets once an event has sold out. Depending on the supply-and-demand for a given ticket, there is a lot of money to be potentially made in ticket scalping. It is illegal most places, you can easily fund your personal ticket purchases by learning the craft of scalping and selling a few at each sold-out show you attend.[1]
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In fact, when we checked, we found that a family of four flying to Tenerife could save £160 if they switched from London Luton to Gatwick, and a family flying to Malaga could save £188 flying from Gatwick instead of Southend. But the reverse can also be true, and our data doesn’t give any solid answers as to whether you’ll typically save by booking at a smaller airport or a larger one.

Not all season tickets are great. In fact, if the team doesn’t play in front of regular strong attendance, then you better be getting a very big discount or stay away. As I mention in the post, it doesn’t matter what kind of discount you get to the box office price, it’s all about your price versus the secondary market price. I have found that there are usually “sweet spots” (often very small sweet spots!) in season tickets. More expensive tickets are almost never the sweet spot, especially from a risk and percentage margin perspective.
Unfortunately for weary travelers, there’s no single best way to find cheap flights. As with any purchase, you need to shop around to get the best deal — by trying different booking sites, altering your dates and waiting until just the right time to purchase. But if you’re willing to put in a little time and effort, you could save big on your next flight.
In July 2015, Government of Ontario declared Ticket Scalping legal as an attempt to regulate online ticketing industry. Similarly in the US, each state has its own ticket reselling law. Some of the states prohibit the reselling of tickets, while some of them regulate it to an extent by mandating a license to resell the tickets. Hence, it is up to the Governments to decide if ticket scalping should be banned, based on the extent of vulnerability and business urgency.
Ok.. So there’s this guy on our local swap and shop on Facebook, claiming to sell Disney on ice tickets for $140 for 4 tickets when they should be about $250 or more and he’s flaked out on me before getting these tickets, now he’s saying he has the tickets but I’m scared there fakes.. How can I spot them out before j give him my money and get to PNC arena and have 2 very upset kids and a pissed off husband for wasting his money.. HELP!!
Whether sports or events, a key factor is buying tickets that stand out or are different in some way. You’re right on about being as careful and aware as possible about supply factors, such as promoters discounting tickets or announcing additional showings/concerts. You also make a very good and fair point about having capital tied up in inventory.
If you live close to more than one airport, check out the fares from all of the airports near you. Many online fare searching engines will ask you if you are willing to depart from or arrive in more than one city. Yes! Also, experiment with different travel dates; shifting your itinerary by a month, a week or even a few days can make a significant difference when looking for cheap flights. You’ll usually find the lowest fares for travel on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays.
In fact, when we checked, we found that a family of four flying to Tenerife could save £160 if they switched from London Luton to Gatwick, and a family flying to Malaga could save £188 flying from Gatwick instead of Southend. But the reverse can also be true, and our data doesn’t give any solid answers as to whether you’ll typically save by booking at a smaller airport or a larger one.
Let's say you've done your best to find the lowest fare, and then the day after purchase your non-refundable fare goes down $100. Sure, if you ask for it you can get a refund for the difference, but it's a little-known fact that some airlines will charge you a "service" or "administrative" fee as high as $100 for domestic fares or from $200-$300 on international ones, wiping out any savings. United, however, will give you the entire fare difference without extracting a fee, as will U.S. Airways (which prominently displays this policy on its site) and JetBlue as long as you accept the reimbursement in the form of a voucher good for future travel. Northwest charges just $25, for both domestic and international fares. American and Delta extract the $100-$300 fees; Southwest gives you a credit for a future flight without charging a fee. Even on these less generous airlines, however, we've heard of plenty of instances where a polite entreaty will get you a full fare difference refund without the penalties, so it's worth try.
“I make sure to use incognito mode on Google Chrome when searching for flights to keep my computer from tracking my history. Sites like Kayak, Expedia, and Priceline can raise the price of the same flight every time you search for it, and incognito mode keeps this from happening.” —Mona Molayem, 28, a travel blogger who takes five international trips a year
The most popular and widely-respected resource on the business of ticket brokering is Ticket Broker Blueprint, written by professional ticket broker Brandon Baker. It is a complete step by step guide to becoming a professional ticket broker, and it has helped thousands of people get started in this industry. Although it was written in 2010, most of the important information you’ll need is just as applicable today as it was when it was first published.
Once you find the 'error fare', you must quickly decide whether to buy it or not. Often, it happens that they eliminate the error within a few hours. Also, this kind of information is spreading around very quickly, so the key is to react promptly and never ever call the airline to obtain a confirmation of whether the price is valid. Of course they will say no and correct the mistake in the very next minute.
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