Whether you know exactly where you’re going or you just want to find to the cheapest possible country to fly into, Kiwi.com is a great tool to get the wanderlust going and save some big bucks. Hop on their site and enter your departure city, then select a date range to fly. Approximate costs then appear over hundreds of countries around the globe from your departure point, while the list of destinations is sorted by price, allowing you to see the most cost-effective place you can fly.
I agree that ticket reselling is probably not the most efficient form of MS. But it can be a profitable reselling endeavor, not unlike other reselling approaches. As with any business venture or MS strategy, clearly one needs to become educated and decide what works best for them. And as Shawn always advocates on this blog, start small. If it works for you, do more. If it doesn’t, stop.
If you live close to more than one airport, check out the fares from all of the airports near you. Many online fare searching engines will ask you if you are willing to depart from or arrive in more than one city. Yes! Also, experiment with different travel dates; shifting your itinerary by a month, a week or even a few days can make a significant difference when looking for cheap flights. You’ll usually find the lowest fares for travel on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays.
Nonstop flights, although convenient, are expensive. To save money, book a flight with at least one stop. Also, search for flight deals at airports close to your destination. Sometimes it's cheaper to fly into Oakland than San Francisco, say, or Newark instead of JFK. Of course, be sure to factor in any additional ground-transportation costs involved in reaching your final destination.

Some airlines let you check one or even two bags for free. Because baggage allowances and fees vary across airlines, the cheapest ticket price isn’t always the cheapest flight option. Take into account how much you’ll end up spending on checked luggage before clicking the lowest number in sight… or avoid the math altogether and keep it carry-on. I’m looking at you Ryanair…
Don't travel at peak times, which means not flying on the Sunday after Thanksgiving or any other time when seats are coveted. Consider starting a summer trip before school is out. Visit Europebefore May and after summer vacations. Be aware, however, that a tidal wave of boomers is expected to flood Europe in the fall, so don't count on bargain transatlantic flights at that time of year. 
After drawing up a list of two to five top possibilities, the next step is to check with those airlines on the airlines' own websites. Sometimes an airline undersells the travel agencies, and since checking each airline takes only a few minutes, that is a possibility worth investigating. Because of the misconception that the airline price will always be higher than that of the travel agent, this step is often overlooked.
So there’s the two ways of doing it, one, a market research type, which we discuss on the Amazon by varying prices. Or second, I feel that the front line really has a lot of intuition on what customers are willing to pay. And that front line has a lot of market research that they can share with the people who set prices to help set the right price.
My husband and I are big concert goers and we are are always buying tickets. We have recently had our first child and are now realizing that we won’t always be able to make it to the concerts we buy tickets for. Because of this, we have been looking for concert ticket services, or other ways that we can re sell some of our tickets. I didn’t realize it was illegal to use certain third parties, I will have to keep doing research on what our best options will be.
I am planning to book an open jaw ticket San Francisco-Paris, Mykonos-San Francisco leaving in late May, returning in mid June. The cheapest I have found using every site I know are around $1800. I was thinking a good price would be around $1300 – $1500, but it may be too late to get these fares. Do you think prices could drop some? Should I wait until January to book? Kayak is not able to give me a buy/wait recommendation.
Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card is a great option to consider if you travel frequently. You'll receive a one-time bonus of 50,000 miles (worth $500 in travel) after spending $3,000 on purchases within 3 months from account opening, enjoy a fantastic rate of 2X miles per $1 on any purchases you make at any time with miles that never expire, and benefit from a flexible redemption option and enjoy the perks of having no foreign transaction fees just to name a few of the benefits of this card. Specific to this card, the miles you earn with Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card can be redeemed towards any travel purchases you charge to this card or transferred to any one of 14 travel loyalty programs.
Many of these budget airlines have their own airline rewards credit cards, and most of them offer a major signup points bonus. For example, Southwest has a credit card associated with Chase offering 40,000 points after spending $1,000 in your first three months. However, a general travel rewards credit card such as the Chase Sapphire Preferred is the best option for most people, as you have the flexibility to redeem your points towards a wide variety of airlines and hotels. You’ll receive 50,000 bonus points worth $625 through the Chase Ultimate Rewards program after you spend $4,000 in the first 3 months of your account opening. Compare this card to other travel cards here.

The chart below shows the combination of the 5-7-13 simple moving average periods on a 1-minute chart. The lines of the 5-7-13 moving averages will stack up, pointing either above or below. Trends have prices stuck to either 5 or 7-bar simple moving averages. Diminishing strength is depicted when price penetrates the 13-bar moving average, an indication of a range bound market or a reversal signal.
And so the new way of thinking about pricing for these events is dynamic pricing. So much like an airline or a hotel, you fluctuate price based on how demand is going. And so it makes intuitive sense, but I think what most people miss on this is demand is very different. So for instance, demand for a flight from Boston to LA, there’s actually nine non-stops a day. And in fact, I looked for Thursday. The prices for these non-stops range from $369 to $2,278.

If you have to travel to a specific place on specific dates (e.g. a family wedding, you got an Oscar nomination) then booking early is the best way to go. But for everything else, the book early advice is nonsense — or at least potentially nonsense. Flight prices go up, flight prices go down. It’s all about supply and demand. If a flight from London to Rome for next month is half full then you’re going to get a great deal (much better than the price you would have gotten booking 6 months in advance). If there’s one ticket left it will cost a fortune.


Also, for those who haul around the world with a baby, many of the airlines jack up the price if you search with a lap infant. You can, however, book the flights online using a low fare finder and then call up and have them add the baby at 10-40% (depending on age and airline) of the fare you paid… I saved £250 that way as the algorithms used arbitrarily jack up the base fare for parents…
Consider budget European airlines. A few of Europe's low-cost carriers have flights between the US and Europe; these don't normally show up in the search results of most US-based airfare comparison sites. Check this list for carriers with hubs near your European destination, then find out if they fly to any US airports. Be forewarned that passenger reviews of these budget carriers' trans-Atlantic flights are mixed regarding their legroom, onboard services, and overall comfort — all of which are more important on a long overseas flight than a quick intra-European hop. Do your homework before committing to a lengthy flight.
United Airlines' MileagePlus: You can earn and spend points on flights with 28 airlines to and from more than 1,100 destinations, thanks to United's StarAlliace partnership. The huge route network, in and out of the U.S., is key here, and makes the complicated MileagePlus redemption plan worth it. Your best bet is to use the points calculator tool to work out how many points you need to get a free flight, and work backwards from there. 

Sign up for low-fare alerts. Many airfare search sites — as well as the official airline sites — will email and tweet automated updates about low fares for specific routes. Or check out AirfareWatchdog, a free service that does a particularly good job of finding the cheapest fares across multiple airlines (including those that don't show up on most search sites), and limits their alerts to flights that actually have seats available. A similar site called FareCompare tweets alerts specific to your home airport.
Whenever I Google flights the tickets for Lufthansa come out to around $1,700 so since we want Lufthansa for sure for all of these flights I went on the Lufthansa website directly and searched for the last two weeks the price for all of these 4 flights came out to $1,383 and went up/down until it hit $1,393 a few days ago for one adult ticket and the child ticket was $1,176 and went up a few dollars as well; and yesterday when I checked it was Tuesday, October 17, 2017 and the price went up to $1,418 for each adult and $1,198 for a child ticket (we are traveling with 2 adults and 1 child age 4). So I noticed the price is slowly going up by a few dollars until it jumped from last week to this week by around $20-$30.
A couple of sites are better for flights to Europe than flights within Europe, and some nice features make their results easier to navigate. Expedia is easy to use and consistent at finding good fares. CheapoAir offers pricing tables for mixed-airline flights to and from Europe. Vayama specializes in international flights, with cheaper fares that might not show up elsewhere — but beware that its customer service doesn't have a stellar reputation for handling cancellations and changes. (For cheap flights within Europe, I prefer Skyscanner.) 

Ticket scalping (aka ticket reselling) is an illegitimate practice of buying tickets to an event and reselling them at inflated rates in the secondary market. In the pre-internet era, ticket touts bought the tickets physically and sold them for a huge profit. Today, bots are programmed by attackers to scalp a maximum number of tickets from a portal as soon as a sale or booking opens.
In my experience, the easiest tickets to buy and resell are in your local market.  You probably have some local knowledge of what is in demand in your city.  In fact, the VERY best tickets to resell are for shows you plan to attend yourself (buy 4 tickets and sell 2 – and you will often times pay for your own 2 tickets that you use!).  It is also easiest to sell via Craigslist if you are selling in your local market.  Some sports teams frown upon people buying simply (or primarily) for the purpose of reselling, but if you live locally it’s tough for them to identify you as a “broker.”  And, if the tickets you have are local, the worst case scenario is that you can use them yourself or find a friend to go to the game or show.
If you book a flight and realize it's not what you want after all, don't worry. If booked more than seven days ahead of departure, all flights out of the U.S. offer a 24-hour hold or cancellation policy. In plain English: You'll get all your money back if you change your mind on that trip to Zanzibar within 24 hours of booking. With this safety net, you can jump on the very best deals without fear, knowing that if plans crumble, you'll get your money back—at the very least.
I agree that ticket reselling is probably not the most efficient form of MS. But it can be a profitable reselling endeavor, not unlike other reselling approaches. As with any business venture or MS strategy, clearly one needs to become educated and decide what works best for them. And as Shawn always advocates on this blog, start small. If it works for you, do more. If it doesn’t, stop. 

Orbitz.com is now the leader in international searches, with two caveats: you can only search by 30-day windows, and for reasons only known to themselves, they have been playing a cat and mouse game with their flexible search function, hiding it one week, and displaying it on their home page the next (if you can't find it, try looking on their site map). Orbitz's flexible search is powered by ITASoftware (www.itasoftware.com), which has its own problems, frequently sending back undecipherable error messages (be patient, it eventually will work). Increasingly, individual airline sites are improving their flexible date search functions. American, AerLingus, Air New Zealand, Spirit, Southwest, and USA3000 all have decent ones.
But warning: You won’t be able to check any bags. Since you’re getting off the flight before it reaches its final destination, any checked bags would head to the next stop without you. You should also avoid using your frequent flyer account number; airlines frown upon this money-saving method, and might cancel your return flight if they discover you doing this.” —Mona Molayem
If you are uncertain about the routes that these low-cost carriers fly, check them out online. For instance, JetBlue serves many of the major U.S. cities, particularly on the East Coast. It also has numerous vacation destinations in Central and South America and the Caribbean; Southwest serves most major U.S. cities as well as a few in Central America and Puerto Rico; Frontier serves most major U.S. cities as well as vacation spots in Mexico, Jamaica and the Dominican Republic; Allegiant Air's focus is transporting leisure travelers to warm vacation destinations like Punta Gorda, Tampa Bay, Las Vegas, Orlando, Los Angeles and Phoenix.
Another advantage of monitoring airfares is that it might show that airfares have dropped since the traveler's ticket was purchased. IndependentTraveler.com refers to the little-known fact that many airlines have a refund policy covering just such an eventuality, but they do not advertise that fact. So, a traveler who buys a ticket only to see the price drop a few weeks later might not lose out after all, but only if he is aware of the price drop in the first place and follows up on that refund.
The fact is that sometimes the cancellation and all the administrative costs caused by the cancellation of a booking are just not worth it for the airline (administrative costs, labor costs and poor marketing impact on social channels and forums). However in case of higher amounts (business class, first class tickets), they are more likely to put their time at risk and make the cancellation.
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