The other primary option for selling tickets is Craigslist. It is an amazing place for buyers and sellers to meet, but also a world fraught with potential scams and frustrations.  I can’t possibly get into all of the details of buying and selling on Craigslist here, but I’ll pass along a few key details.  Of course, the biggest benefit of selling via Craigslist is that there are no fees.  The downside is that you must interact with people.  And those people are always looking for a deal and usually horrible at communicating.


So let’s go back to the San Francisco Giants. If they have an experimental section and they drop the price, why would I buy a ticket in the next section over that’s at a much higher price? So if I were going to buy that ticket, I would say, well, gee, I can save $10 by going to the experimental section. Why not? So my hunch is that there was a lot of cannibalization going on, and that 20% figure really didn’t represent new revenue, getting people price sensitive, in the door. My hunch is that the majority of this increased 20% came from people who would have actually paid a higher price. That’s a negative of dynamic pricing that I don’t think has been satisfactorily accounted for.
I’m kind of a relative newbie to the points/miles hobby (just ask Shawn). My sorry little blog is truly an endeavor targeted at friends and family who would (sorry Shawn) never come to MtM (or even the pure “deals” websites). I haven’t done a conference of any sort, but I would love to go to Trevor’s ResellingDO. (Just too far away! come out West, Trevor!) Maybe someday I will expand on this brief introduction (and sure there’s many other folks far more experience than I am!), whether on this blog or at a conference. I’m glad you found it an interesting topic.

This works for your arrival airport, too, but a note of caution – if you’re unsure where the airports are and how to get to and from them, do your research before booking. Sometimes the cheaper airport can cost you more in transportation costs, eliminating any savings you might have made on the fare. The fixed-fare price for a taxi into the city centre from Rome Fiumicino Airport is €48 (per vehicle, not per passenger), compared to just €30 from Rome Ciampino Airport, so bear this in mind when deciding on which flight to book.
I never give out my phone number in a Craigslist ad for selling tickets and always try to strike up a conversation via email with a potential buyer.  Usually pretty quickly you can determine if the person communicates clearly and feels like the type of person you want to “do business” with.  If they aren’t, just move on (unless you’re desperate to sell at the last minute – which happens sometimes!).
Last-minute weekend fares are often great deals, but most people don't realize that they can construct itineraries by combining two of these fares. Let's say you want to fly from Boston to San Antonio next weekend, and you've signed up for all the weekly newsletters alerting you of these deals but there's no Boston/San Antonio deals listed. However, if there's a Boston to Atlanta fare for $128 round-trip, and an Atlanta to San Antonio fare for $108 round-trip, then there is indeed a Boston/San Antonio fare as well. Just buy two separate fares (we've noticed that Travelocity and some other sites do a good job of combining weekend fares in this manner). You can even combine such fares on two different airlines, but make sure you leave enough time in between connecting flights in case there's a delay.
The chart below shows the combination of the 5-7-13 simple moving average periods on a 1-minute chart. The lines of the 5-7-13 moving averages will stack up, pointing either above or below. Trends have prices stuck to either 5 or 7-bar simple moving averages. Diminishing strength is depicted when price penetrates the 13-bar moving average, an indication of a range bound market or a reversal signal.
So that goes back to the notion of value. So I value the certainty of having great tickets to the Rolling Stones or the Red Sox versus the Yankees. So I’m willing to pay a premium just to get that certainty. But much like what you see in life, and in pricing in general, if you’re willing to wait it out and deal with the uncertainty, you can get the best tickets at face value, if not lower, if you wait until the very last minute. 

Spotting fake tickets can be difficult, especially if the fake ticket is printed on the same material as that real tickets. This can happen when material is stolen from the company that prints the real tickets. The best way to ensure that a ticket is real, is to purchase it yourself from a legitimate ticket agency, such as Ticketmaster, or to take it to the venue before the event and ask the staff to scan it to see if it is real. Beyond that, there may not be a great way to tell until you get ejected from the event. If you have received a suspicious looking ticket, it is best to check into it before the night of the event. 

Getting a cheap flight is really about timing. Prices fluctuate heavily and often on all routes. Booking a flight today from London to Bali could cost £600, but tomorrow it could be £300 on the same airline. These unannounced sales – when an airline suddenly drops its prices – are triggered because airlines release tickets 11 months in advance and predict what percentage of tickets will be sold as time moves on. For example, after five months they may expect to have sold 30% of the tickets but if sales are not as high as anticipated, it will announce a flash sale. Prices will plummet (by up to 60% on occasions) for a few days until demand catches up.

In my experience, the easiest tickets to buy and resell are in your local market.  You probably have some local knowledge of what is in demand in your city.  In fact, the VERY best tickets to resell are for shows you plan to attend yourself (buy 4 tickets and sell 2 – and you will often times pay for your own 2 tickets that you use!).  It is also easiest to sell via Craigslist if you are selling in your local market.  Some sports teams frown upon people buying simply (or primarily) for the purpose of reselling, but if you live locally it’s tough for them to identify you as a “broker.”  And, if the tickets you have are local, the worst case scenario is that you can use them yourself or find a friend to go to the game or show.
Price Isn’t Always Everything: it’s all about what matters to you that determines whether airfare is truly “great” or not. Do you value price over schedule, or schedule over price? Usually, there’s a trade-off. After all, you may get a great deal by doing a three-connection flight littered with redeyes, but unless you really love to fly it may be worth spending the extra money to get yourself there comfortably.

Companies who resell tickets are called ticket brokers. Some would argue they are scalpers, as well. However, reputable ticket brokers follow laws, register with the Better Business Bureau and National Association of Ticket Brokers, make you pay with a credit card and take steps to safeguard against fraud. So there is a difference between buying from a street scalper and an online "scalper," even if it hits your pocketbook the same way.
Springsteen’s style might seem more altruistic, but performers who undercharge their fans can paradoxically reap higher profits than those who maximize each ticket price. It’s a strategy similar to the one employed by ventures like casinos and cruise ships, which take a hit on admission prices but make their money once the customers are inside. Concert promoters can overcharge on everything from beer sales to T-shirts, and the benefits of low-priced tickets can accrue significantly over the years as loyal fans return. In part, this explains why artists like Springsteen and Petty are content to undercharge at the gate while others, perhaps wary of their own staying power, are eager to capitalize while they can.

The last tickets I had to sell were Dave Chappelle in NYC. I said to myself, “get rid of these and start acting like an adult and find a real job.” Low and behold these tickets were hot, I made some good money, and I was hooked! I started buying and selling everything in site. All I had was $2,500 in my bank account and about a $2,000 limit on my credit card, so I had to find a way to buy tickets and continually sell them before my credit card payment deadline occured, for I was not paying interest, and not lose more than $2,500! Somehow I made this work, and I was literally doing this credit card dance for 2-3 years (with a higher credit limit). There were plenty of times that I bought tickets that were barely worth the paper they were printed on, but that is how I learned the business. Through trial and error. Over time I just made less errors.
Your flight to Europe will likely be your biggest trip expense — it pays to be on your toes to get the best deal. And keep in mind that there's no such thing as a free lunch in the airline industry. (In fact, these days there's usually no lunch at all.) Before grabbing the cheapest ticket you can find, make sure it meets your travel needs with the best combination of schedule, economy, and convenience.
In fact, many people use their credit card to pay for travel without even knowing that doing so may entitle them to travel benefits. Perks which you may be entitled to when you use your credit card to pay, like medical evacuation coverage (The Platinum Card® from American Express, a GET.com advertiser) which can cover the cost of transporting you home in case of a medical emergency, airline credit towards incidental costs and even towards airfare, discounts at hotels and restaurants (Visa, Mastercard and American Express offer these, and your bank may offer more).
Besides season tickets, the other common reselling opportunity is for big events, most notably music concerts, comedians, and shows.  These are obviously less consistent in nature than season tickets, but are also potentially more lucrative, given that many events are for one night only and sometimes in very high demand.  Selling tickets for individual shows is also obviously less of a time and financial commitment.
Is it possible at all? A bullet-proof secure and transparent solution, at the same time streamlined and easy to use for fans, without extra hustle? A solution that would enable artists and promoters to control revenue and pricing both on the primary and secondary markets as well as provide flexible tools for ticket vendors, while helping maintain fair pricing for fans?
However, you can earn a lot of miles through credit card sign up bonus, online shopping, surveys, special offers, and more. I earn over a million miles a year – without flying or spending extra money. That translates into dozens of free flights (often in business class) for myself and my family. If you are smart with your money and collect points and miles (the art of “travel hacking”), you can travel around the world for very little (and often free). Here are some articles on travel hacking that can help:
Getting a cheap flight is really about timing. Prices fluctuate heavily and often on all routes. Booking a flight today from London to Bali could cost £600, but tomorrow it could be £300 on the same airline. These unannounced sales – when an airline suddenly drops its prices – are triggered because airlines release tickets 11 months in advance and predict what percentage of tickets will be sold as time moves on. For example, after five months they may expect to have sold 30% of the tickets but if sales are not as high as anticipated, it will announce a flash sale. Prices will plummet (by up to 60% on occasions) for a few days until demand catches up.

Delta Aeroflot, Aerolineas Argentinas, AeroMexico, AirEuropa, Air France, Alaska Airlines, Alitalia, China Airlines, China Eastern, China Southern, Czech Airlines, Garuda Indonesia, GOL Airlines, Hawaiian Airlines, Jet Wirways, KLM, Korean Air, Middle Eastern Airlines, Seabourne Airlines, Transavia, Tarom, Vietnam Airlines, Virgin Atlantic, Virgin Australia, Westjet, Xiamen Air.

Book seven weeks in advance. Passengers pay the lowest price, nearly 10 percent below the average fare, if they buy 50 days before their flight, according to data from the Airlines Reporting Corporation. The data was compiled by examining 2017 ticket sales from online and corporate travel agencies in the U.S. for the top 500 origin-and-destination markets. But the seven-week rule isn't necessarily a surefire strategy for snagging the cheapest fare. "This is just a trend," explains Chuck Thackston, ARC's managing director of data science and research. "Airlines will make valuable deals available all the time. But, on average, we see this [50-day] approach works."
While most airlines put a heavy surcharge on one-way tickets (often charging 80% of or sometimes the same price as a return), airlines such as Norwegian offer one-way tickets for roughly half the price of a return. This affects other airline’s prices, such as TAP Portugal and KLM, too. This means for trips to the US, particularly those when you might not know the exact date, or airport of your return, it makes sense to book a one-way ticket there, and another one back.
Consider Another Departure Airport: If you live near more than one airport, make sure you look at all available flights from each airport. Chances are one will be much cheaper than the other, or offer better times and aircraft. A good example of this is the New York area, which plays host to three major international airports: John F. Kennedy (JFK), La Guardia (LGA) and Newark (EWR). 

The other primary option for selling tickets is Craigslist. It is an amazing place for buyers and sellers to meet, but also a world fraught with potential scams and frustrations.  I can’t possibly get into all of the details of buying and selling on Craigslist here, but I’ll pass along a few key details.  Of course, the biggest benefit of selling via Craigslist is that there are no fees.  The downside is that you must interact with people.  And those people are always looking for a deal and usually horrible at communicating.
Airlines, in general, rarely share all the possible fares or "fare buckets" that are available on any given flight on any given day. Many times travelers are faced with choosing between a full fare ticket and the lowest fare ticket, not knowing that there can sometimes be as many as 20 additional fare buckets available for that flight. At best, only the lowest fare in each fare category will be presented to the business traveler as options.
Want to increase your odds of booking at the right time? Check out the Best Time to Book tool, which gives an indication of the best time to book your tickets between set routes for hundreds of destinations – and the cheapest months to travel, too. So whether you want to book a dream trip to Tokyo or a citybreak to Krakow, it’ll tell you how far ahead to book – and which months to travel – to maximise your chances of the lowest fares.
Qantas American Airlines, British Airways, Finnair, Japan Airlines and LAN, and has additional commercial agreements with Aer Lingus, Aircalin, Air Niugini, Air North, Air Tahiti Nui, Air Vanuatu, Alaska Airlines, Alitalia, Asiana Airlines, Bangkok Airways, China Eastern, China Southern, El Al, Emirates, Fiji Airways, Jet Airways, Jetstar, and Vietnam Airlines.
Let’s say you’re bumped from a flight, but the airline still manages to get you where you’re going within an hour of the original arrival time. You’ve got no cause to complain, really, other than just being a dick, and you’re not going to see any compensation. BUT, if you arrive between one and two hours past your original arrival time on a domestic flight (or between one and four hours for international), they owe you compensation of 200% of the one-way fare to your destination -- up to a maximum of $675. And for domestic flights arriving more than two hours later, you are entitled to 400% of your one-way fare -- the US Department of Transportation (DOT) requires they compensate you in cash, up to $1,350.
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