Once you find the 'error fare', you must quickly decide whether to buy it or not. Often, it happens that they eliminate the error within a few hours. Also, this kind of information is spreading around very quickly, so the key is to react promptly and never ever call the airline to obtain a confirmation of whether the price is valid. Of course they will say no and correct the mistake in the very next minute.
Lufthansa Adria Airways, Aegean Airlines, Air Canada, Air China, Air India, Air Malta, Air New Zealand, All Nippon Airways, Austrian Airlines, Avianca, BMI Regional, Brussels Airlines, Copa Airlines, Croatia Airlines, Egypt Air, Ethiopian Airlines, Germanwings, Latam Airlines, LOT Polish Airlines, Luxair, Privatair, Singapore Airlines, Scandinavian Airlines, South African Airways, SWISS, TAP Portugal, Thai Airways, Turkish Airlines, United.

That is where my ticket broker “career” began. On eBay. While I was in college, at Texas A&M (Gig EM!), I wanted really good seats for a TOOL concert. On the floor, in the pit. Ticketmaster had sold out of those seats, so I searched the internet and found that they were selling tickets on eBay for about $75 each. “Great”, I thought! I bought a pair and was fired up for the show. For years I always wondered how this person obtained these tickets and how easily he/she just profited from this transaction, for he probably made about $100 in ten minutes of work.


Ok.. So there’s this guy on our local swap and shop on Facebook, claiming to sell Disney on ice tickets for $140 for 4 tickets when they should be about $250 or more and he’s flaked out on me before getting these tickets, now he’s saying he has the tickets but I’m scared there fakes.. How can I spot them out before j give him my money and get to PNC arena and have 2 very upset kids and a pissed off husband for wasting his money.. HELP!!

Timing is everything. You may be tempted to wait for the weekend to sit down and book your dream getaway, but experts say that flight prices are actually lowest on Tuesday afternoons when all the major airlines post their pricing updates for the coming week and before they can edit them to match their competitors rates. A tool like Google Flights and their price tracker can help greatly when searching prices on Tuesday afternoons!
Unless you’ve got a no-brainer on your hands like front row seats to Justin Bieber concert or you were able to somehow land Super Bowl, it’s best to start with relatively inexpensive tickets and work your way up to the larger events. Even with a good amount of experience doing mock pulls, you’ll inevitably make mistakes at the start and you don’t want them to set you too far back right out of the gate. What you want to do is ease into it and only buy tickets that you are very confident you’ll be able to sell for a decent sized profit.
When I moved back to Texas after Grad School my parents were absolutely hounding me about getting a full time job. I swear, all I heard from them was “You have to get a job with a 401k and health insurance!” I finally dropped the bomb on them that I was going to use my college degree and MBA to be a ticket broker. I would not be getting any 401K nor would I have any health insurance…they were not pleased to say the least.

Whenever I Google flights the tickets for Lufthansa come out to around $1,700 so since we want Lufthansa for sure for all of these flights I went on the Lufthansa website directly and searched for the last two weeks the price for all of these 4 flights came out to $1,383 and went up/down until it hit $1,393 a few days ago for one adult ticket and the child ticket was $1,176 and went up a few dollars as well; and yesterday when I checked it was Tuesday, October 17, 2017 and the price went up to $1,418 for each adult and $1,198 for a child ticket (we are traveling with 2 adults and 1 child age 4). So I noticed the price is slowly going up by a few dollars until it jumped from last week to this week by around $20-$30.
I have a question. I was wondering how probable it is for Singapore Airlines to lower their fare? We are traveling on March/April to Tokyo and I think that airline has the best fare. I checked the price last month and now that I was ready to buy the tickets it was $450 more than what it was! I was going to wait and see if it drops but then it says “a few seats left”. I don´t want the prices to go up again.
My husband and I are big concert goers and we are are always buying tickets. We have recently had our first child and are now realizing that we won’t always be able to make it to the concerts we buy tickets for. Because of this, we have been looking for concert ticket services, or other ways that we can re sell some of our tickets. I didn’t realize it was illegal to use certain third parties, I will have to keep doing research on what our best options will be.

The longer it is before 1st pitch, the more expensive the tickets will be. If there's a giveaway, same. Always be prepared to say no & walk. Usually they run after you for the sale. Once the game begins, prices go WAY down: they just need to unload everything, as they're about to be worthless. Great deals can be had this way because at this point they've made their invested money back & those last tickets are profit. Look at the tickets carefully to make sure they're not selling yesterday's tickets (corny but it happens).
It's often cheaper to buy two fares rather than one. Let's say you're flying from New York to Eleuthera in the Bahamas. Check on one of the big sites like Expedia or Orbitz for a single fare (for example, JFK to Governor's Harbor, Bahamas) and then do two separate searches (JFK to Nassau and Nassau to Governor's Harbor). Chances are the two-fare strategy will save you a lot of cash. This fare trick also works for flights to Europe (fly into London or Manchester, UK on one fare and then hop on a discount European airline to reach your final destination) and Asia. To search route possibilities on these discounters, check out the Airfarewatchdog route maps page.
Thanks, Joey, for sharing your perspective and experience. As I state in my very first paragraph of this blog, I know that some people are simply philosophically opposed to the entire concept of ticket reselling (I think I also mention the risk there too!!). I’m not saying it makes it right (or wrong), but the reality is that lots of people are reselling tickets and the genie is out of the bottle on the free market setting ticket prices.

The moment you figure out that you really can book $200 round-trip tickets to Europe, your life changes forever. The idea of travel becomes less a question of "how" and more a matter of "Where to?" Start spreading the news—it's never been cheaper to fly, and with a minimal amount of work, you can cash in. It's a matter of decoding airline jargon, doing some pre-planning, and getting acquainted with OTAs. Here, we answer all your questions about how to find cheap flights.
The professional ticket scalpers you encounter in the parking lot are brokers or middlemen looking to capitalize on an arbitrage opportunity. Arbitrage is the practice of taking advantage of a price difference between two markets. In scalping, it’s the difference between what a fan looking to unload an extra ticket asks for versus the price you, a fan without a ticket, will pay to get into the arena.  
All information published here is personal opinion and comes from personal experience. The information published on this site/page should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal financial or professional advice. ESR Media, LLC, Miles to Memories and the author strongly recommend that you seek independent advice before you apply for any product or service, which is described on the site/page.
Editorial Disclosure: Any personal views and opinions expressed by the author in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of GET.com. The editorial content on this page is not provided by any of the companies mentioned, and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities. Opinions expressed here are author's alone, not those of the companies mentioned, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.
Airlines, in general, rarely share all the possible fares or "fare buckets" that are available on any given flight on any given day. Many times travelers are faced with choosing between a full fare ticket and the lowest fare ticket, not knowing that there can sometimes be as many as 20 additional fare buckets available for that flight. At best, only the lowest fare in each fare category will be presented to the business traveler as options.
All information published here is personal opinion and comes from personal experience. The information published on this site/page should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal financial or professional advice. ESR Media, LLC, Miles to Memories and the author strongly recommend that you seek independent advice before you apply for any product or service, which is described on the site/page.
If it's happened to you, contact the airline or booking site straight away to see if you can get it amended (see How to Complain for help). Let them know it's a known fault others have reported too. Yet sadly you've few rights if the airline refuses to correct it, as it'd be difficult to prove it's their error, and it may charge you fees to amend or cancel.
Sign up for low-fare alerts. Many airfare search sites — as well as the official airline sites — will email and tweet automated updates about low fares for specific routes. Or check out AirfareWatchdog, a free service that does a particularly good job of finding the cheapest fares across multiple airlines (including those that don't show up on most search sites), and limits their alerts to flights that actually have seats available. A similar site called FareCompare tweets alerts specific to your home airport.
This list wouldn't be complete without the mention of social media. The best way to stay on top of the latest in just about anything these days is social media. Find out what the best deals are right now in real time by following your preferred airlines on social media. Additionally, following #airfare on Twitter will provide you with the latest in flight deals from all of the major airlines and airfare sites.
“And if you’re not sure where to go, use Skyscanner’s handy Map View feature to find the best-value destinations from your local airport. You can easily set filters to your travel month and for direct or indirect routes. Then it’s simply a matter of scrolling through the map and you’ll see the best value destinations – with some of the best bargains already highlighted for you.”
On your way to a game/tailgate/car park/on the highway, you'll probably hear people yelling "need tickets." He's not asking for one—he wants to sell them. More often than not, the tickets you buy are copies of an original ticket—which means that as soon as you get into the stadium, you're screwed. I've heard the story a number of times. It's not fun.
[…] If tickets sell out, which is likely, fans can still buy them through another vendor. Browse resale tickets on a third-party site like StubHub or search Craigslist for fans looking to unload extra tickets. But be wary of scalpers with marked up prices and make sure you’re spending your money wisely by looking on Facebook fan groups for tickets, prioritizing physical tickets over PDFs and negotiating prices, according to Showbams.com. […]
You probably already get bombarded with emails from every store, website, and vacation spot you’ve ever so much as looked at, but when you’re cleaning out your inbox don’t be so quick to unsubscribe from airline or travel site emails. While they might seem like just another empty marketing tool, airline emails can tip you off to flash sales or special deals you might otherwise miss. I recently scored half price tickets to Thailand because of a flash sale e-mail notice, true story!
"Cheap" is always relative, depending on your budget and needs, but we have a few guidelines in the Traveler office for what counts as a good deal from the U.S. Flights to Europe at or under $400 round-trip are a go. Getting to Northern Africa for less than $500 is a steal. Round-trips to South America at or under $500 are also great, a number that applies to flights to Asia, too. Going farther afield, anything under $1,000 is a stellar deal for southern Africa, Australia, and New Zealand. That said, if you see a flight that's cheap enough to make you want to book, go for it. The "grass is greener, flight is cheaper" mentality of waiting for the least expensive flight will make you miss out on some great (and yes, cheap) flights.
Finally, in many cities, legit ticket resellers have store fronts close to the venue. They are always a worth a visit before you turn to a scalper as they often have deals on last minute tickets. The rule with them is never take the price they first offer unless it is within $10-15 of face value. If it is more, being willing to walk away never hurt anyone and usually net’s a price cut.
We had really good seats in the 5th row but as we got closer to a game we couldn't attend we would negotiate a really good deal with someone vs them not getting used. We would snap a picture of the tickets and sometimes our account to let the buyer know we were legit. They could pay by paypal which most people have today. Then we would email them directly to the buyer from our ownership account so they knew they were the real deal.
As an industry leader, with access to nearly limitless data, Ticketmaster can determine fairly precisely just how much fans are willing to pay for every kind of show. Generally speaking, Smith says, artists who charged a lot more for the best 1,000 or so seats would reduce the incentive for scalpers to buy these tickets; it would also allow artists to charge even less for the rest of the seats in the house. Kid Rock told me that on his forthcoming tour, he is planning on charging a lot more than usual for “platinum seating” so that all other seats — including those in the first two rows — can be around $20. “It’s a smart thing for me to do,” he said. “We’re going to make money; I’m going to make money. I want to prove there is a better way to do this.”
Ok.. So there’s this guy on our local swap and shop on Facebook, claiming to sell Disney on ice tickets for $140 for 4 tickets when they should be about $250 or more and he’s flaked out on me before getting these tickets, now he’s saying he has the tickets but I’m scared there fakes.. How can I spot them out before j give him my money and get to PNC arena and have 2 very upset kids and a pissed off husband for wasting his money.. HELP!!
Before you get started, it’s critical that you secure at least $5-10k in startup capital to give you a nice cushion when you’re first learning the ropes. Rest assured, mistakes will be made and money will be lost at the very beginning. The last thing you need is to fall behind on your monthly bills just because you’re waiting on someone to snatch up tickets that you’ve listed. Instead, make sure you have ample cash reserves to fund your venture from Day 1.
But warning: You won’t be able to check any bags. Since you’re getting off the flight before it reaches its final destination, any checked bags would head to the next stop without you. You should also avoid using your frequent flyer account number; airlines frown upon this money-saving method, and might cancel your return flight if they discover you doing this.” —Mona Molayem
Whether you know exactly where you’re going or you just want to find to the cheapest possible country to fly into, Kiwi.com is a great tool to get the wanderlust going and save some big bucks. Hop on their site and enter your departure city, then select a date range to fly. Approximate costs then appear over hundreds of countries around the globe from your departure point, while the list of destinations is sorted by price, allowing you to see the most cost-effective place you can fly.
It’s rarer to find cheap last-minute flights with non-charter airlines. With those airlines the best time to book is around 6 to 12 weeks in advance – which is based on statistics garnered from tracking all flights. However, it varies heavily by airline, route and season, making it difficult to predict these. It’s all based on supply and demand, so if a certain route has a lot of demand this year it won’t fall in price.
Owing to the benefits of blockchain technology, when a smart ticket is issued, its origin and pricing can be tracked from the very moment of issue that is registered in a smart-contract, up to the redemption at the door. Even if a ticket is resold, there is no way to copy and resell a duplicate, or override resale rules specified by the promoter, unlike it often happens with conventional forms of tickets.
Aim to buy higher quality tickets. Unlike selling online, you are probably not going to be able to sell to a large amount of buyers while scalping in person. Realistically, a dedicated scalper may only sell to a few parties in one night, so it's important to make those sales count with higher quality tickets. Buy your tickets early, and make sure the tickets themselves are part of a tier that's bound to sell out fast.
Finally, in many cities, legit ticket resellers have store fronts close to the venue. They are always a worth a visit before you turn to a scalper as they often have deals on last minute tickets. The rule with them is never take the price they first offer unless it is within $10-15 of face value. If it is more, being willing to walk away never hurt anyone and usually net’s a price cut.

Increasingly, airlines are launching "private" sales, reserving their very best fares for their own sites. With the exception of Southwest (www.southwest.com), now the second largest carrier by passengers flown, most of the airlines that do this are smaller domestic airlines or large international carriers, but we've even seen Delta do it, and we're not talking here just about last-minute weekend fares. Air New Zealand, Aloha, Malaysia, Frontier, Qantas, Singapore, SAS, Spirit, and others are using this strategy. Alaska Airlines has almost-weekly 20 percent off sales that you won't find anywhere but Alaska's site (www.alaskaairlines.com). Niche carriers like USA3000 (www.usa3000.com) and Allegiant Air (www.allegiantair.com) usually don't share their fare data with third-party sites at all, and although USA3000 fares are included in Sidestep.com searches, that airline has frequent $10 off sales that are only valid only on its website.


Consider hidden fees. If you're using an online marketplace like StubHub, you should keep in mind the fees you may incur.[9] StubHub typically siphons 15% of your profits, plus a service charge. If you're selling enough tickets and cutting enough of a profit margin, this shouldn't be an issue. If you're a more small-time scalper however, you may be better off with using a site like Craigslist or selling the tickets in person.
It can be difficult to know at what point your error fare is confirmed, as airlines' terms and conditions don't always clearly spell out at what point your contract with them is legally binding, and therefore your ticket is guaranteed. For an example of an airline refusing to honour an error fare, see our BA cancels cheap tickets to Middle East MSE News story.
Most people have some degree of anxiety when booking airline tickets. There often seems to be no logic to fares, and once you're onboard you wonder if the person next to you got a better deal than you did. If you're willing to invest a little time, however, you can find a great airfare and feel confident that, even if you didn't get the cheapest ticket of everyone on your flight, you did pretty well. Here are 8 tips to help you find the best airfare.
Realistically, it may be difficult to fight your corner if an airline does cancel your flight. If you've already booked other aspects of your trip such as accommodation, you can try to claim it as 'consequential loss' from the airline you booked with – but there are no guarantees this will work. Ultimately you'd likely need to go to the small claims court to try to get back any additional costs incurred (but again there are no guarantees).
Let's say you've done your best to find the lowest fare, and then the day after purchase your non-refundable fare goes down $100. Sure, if you ask for it you can get a refund for the difference, but it's a little-known fact that some airlines will charge you a "service" or "administrative" fee as high as $100 for domestic fares or from $200-$300 on international ones, wiping out any savings. United, however, will give you the entire fare difference without extracting a fee, as will U.S. Airways (which prominently displays this policy on its site) and JetBlue as long as you accept the reimbursement in the form of a voucher good for future travel. Northwest charges just $25, for both domestic and international fares. American and Delta extract the $100-$300 fees; Southwest gives you a credit for a future flight without charging a fee. Even on these less generous airlines, however, we've heard of plenty of instances where a polite entreaty will get you a full fare difference refund without the penalties, so it's worth try.
Fall means sweater weather, crunchy leaves, bonfires and family time. Take the season to explore the great outdoors while temperatures are crisp and the summer crowds have dispersed. We've rounded up 12 rentals available on popular home-sharing websites that are perfect for an autumn weekend getaway. From a remodeled train car remodel to a cozy Victorian, there is something for every taste and preference. Prices are listed per-night and may vary by date.  (Lauren Hill)
Sounds funny how it is your vocation yet you say it’s a bad idea for people to do the same thing you do. I’m sure we’re all adults here and any intelligent person will know there are risks and research further. You’re never going to stop the idiots from making a mess of their life even with good advice. I do agree though, that there are more safe ways to MS. I think the blogger isn’t promoting this as the only or best way.
For many of us, airfare can be a struggle, both in terms of cost and availability. But when it comes to planning your river cruise vacation, there are some simple research precautions you can take early on in the process to ensure you don’t end up on the wrong side of the airfare game. The first step starts with doing some research on your hometown airport.
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